You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘wooden boats’ category.

Why wood?   It’s been awhile since I asked that . . .  I suppose I should ask why so many wooden runabouts and cruisers suddenly swarmed in the St. Clair, but it was enjoyable.  But here is the event, and if you want to get into a wooden boat, as maybe I do, here’s a ticket.

Jeffery Dave is a Higgins . . . maybe early 1960s?

Miss Minneapolis IV.

Bette Noir heads into the Black River…

Names as I can read them . . . Tiger Lily, 

Cracker Jack and Cracker Jack (?),

just a beautiful classic,

and Nigel’s Launch.  Can anyone identify the manufacturer?

Don’t tell Nigel . . .

Let’s end it here with a SeaSkiff named The Old Lady.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who would be happy to attend this boat show.

Lots more of everything to come . . .

 

 

You’ve seen Onrust on this blog many times even before she floated.  Click on the link that follows for the time she flew through then air  in transition to taking the waters for the first time. “Jacht“, the term, originates from the Dutch word for hunt.  The “j” in jacht is pronounced like the English “y” and the “ch” sounds like you’re rudely scrapping your throat.   You maybe know this if you’re a fan of Jägermeister, translates as master of the hunt, or something like that.

Here’s a yacht I saw this summer, Trumpy design, Trumpy being an American naval architect born in Bergen, Norway.

For more info on Trumpy and Mathis, click here.

For more info on Freedom and other yachts including Enticer, click here. I’ve seen Enticer in places as diverse as Kingston NY, Buffalo, and Mackinac Island; however, it appears I’ve yet to do a post on her.

Here Freedom is made fast at Chelsea Piers.

And Onrust, she was a sight to see the other night almost appearing to float through the night air.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has previously posted about yachts here.

Schooner Richard Robbins Sr. has not appeared in this blog for almost 11 years, but once last summer while I was looking for something else, there she came into view, and sporting a fresh coat of paint.

Richard Robbins Sr., built in 1902 as a Delaware Bay oyster schooner, is one of five that remain.  An NPS report on one of the others —Isaac H. Evans–can be read here.

More on RR Sr. here.

Anyone know how deep the centerboard swings?

I don’t know if she’s still out of the water.  When she went (or goes) in, she’ll need to hang in the slings awhile to allow the banks to swell shut again.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, back last August.

 

well . . . it’s a lobster boat, so what else might they be doing?

It does have the lines albeit a tad modified, and of course

I can find a fake news site that has text and REAL PICTURES!! of lobsters invading the shore of Lake Michigan here.

But seriously, it seems Ugly Anne was built in Maine, where it worked lobstering from 1975 until the mid-90s, when it was brought to the Mackinac Straits.

I wonder how those Great Lakes lobster taste.

 

Many thanks to Ken Deeley for today’s photos.  The vessel with the red house is surely one of the Standard Boat stick lighter fleet, but I can’t read the name on the bow.  A half decade I posted a photo here (scroll) of a decrepit Ollie, the stick lighter that used to tie up at South Street.   He can’t quite put a date on this photo taken at South Street Seaport Museum’s pier.  Can anyone date these photos?  And what was that green/white dome in the background?

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Coming down the Hudson, Ken got this photo of suction dredger Sugar Island.  Currently, Sugar Island is working off Bahrain.

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Many thanks to Ken for sending along these photos.

Click here for a 1992 publication by Robert Foster and Jane Steuerwald called “The Lighterage System in the New York/New Jersey Harbor,” referencing stick lighters and much more.

July 13 saw my first sighting of this intrepid anachronism, here juxtaposed with a 21st century realm of Logi.

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She was then probing the inland seas, seeing how far she could voyage, possibly looking for a passage to the Mississippi and the Gulf via Lake Michigan.  OK, indulge me on that speculation.

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Our paths next crossed on September 1, as she made her way through the Erie Canal,

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with all the modifications that entailed and the use of sunstones to

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avoid getting lost in the meandering rivers.

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And late last week, Bjoern Kils of the New York Media Boat got this fabulous shot of her scoping out the sixth boro before

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she slipped into a Manhattan cove for a spell.

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I missed the display in the Winter Garden and hope I can get there again before the boat moves on.

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Many thanks to Bjoern for use of that photo. For more of Bjoern’s photos, click here.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  And following up on some info from Conrad Milster, here’s a video on a Viking ship that traveled to Chicago in 1893.  Yes, 1893!!   And the crossing from Bergen NO to New Haven CT with Captain Magnus Andersen and 11 crew took 30 days.  Then the vessel, dubbed Viking, traveled up the Hudson and through the pre-Barge Canal on its way to Chicago with stops in Albany, Syracuse, Rochester, and Cleveland.  The vessel is still there in Geneva IL.  Here’s another video on the ship.

To pick up on the NY canals’ connection, as we approach the bicentennial of the start of the Erie Canal, it would be great to seek out and archive any photos–still languishing in local photo troves–of the 1893 passage there of Viking, as well as of any other outstanding vessels that have traversed the Canal throughout its history.

And since my focus these days is on chrononauts, there is this fleet that comes through the sixth boro every few years.  I caught up with them in Newburgh in 2012 and Oswego in 2014.

 

 

I’ve never been to the Swiss Lakes, but I’m grateful to Rich Taylor, who spent some time there this summer, for these photos of paddle steamers.  PS Gallia dates from 1913 and

IMG_4672 Gallia 1913 adj

PS Schiller, below, from 1906.  Rich writes, “We sailed aboard at every opportunity, on occasion having a prepared meal from the on board galley. They are a integral part of the Swiss transit system and as such covered by the Swiss Travel Pass making connections with other boats, trains, hotels, lakeside villages; all very pleasant.”

Note the puff of steam?  Rich writes, “When one steamboat passes another,  advance announcement is made by the captain; then there is a whistle salute from each.”  I wonder if part of that advance announcement is to cover your ears if you are close to the whistle.

IMG_4690 Schiller 1906 adj

PS William Tell built 1908, a near sister to Schiller, has been moored as a floating restaurant since 1970.”  Click here for some interior photos, which give me an appetite to travel there some summer.

IMG_4333 062516 DS William Tell Luzerne

Rich took these two photos of PS Stadt Luzern,  built 1928,  near Vitznau.  I had to look up that location.

IMG_4414 062516 Stadt Luzerne 1928

 

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Click here and here for more info on Lake Lucerne.

Two things come to mind as I look at these.  First, of course there were bowsprite’s  too-short-liaison with steamships here, and then there were a few surviving US  steam yachts I saw at Mystic Seaport here.

Many thanks to Rich for these photos.

Here was 1 and another I could have called “summer yachts” as well.  And then there are this one and another . . .  again . . .

Pilar is a stunner in so many ways . . .  registered in Key West and originally Elhanor, I believe it was built in Brooklyn one hull BEFORE Hemingway’s Pilar.

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I caught it in Narragansett Bay . . . .

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Off the Bronx, this unnamed unidentified vessel, likely NOT built in the Bronx,  roared past.

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Some interesting boats on the wall at Waterford here include Solar Sal, Manatee, and Little Manatee.

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Manatee is a Kadey Krogen with an unusual paint scheme.

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I took this photo of Solar Sal last September and had intended to get back to it.  Later last fall it distinguished itself by hauling cargo.

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Tjaldur is an unusual

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double-ender.

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Old Glory is an Owens . . . seen in Buffalo on the 4th of July.

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In Mackinac, I saw this 1953 Chris Craft named

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Marion Leigh.

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Here’s another shot of the rare Whiticar Boat Works yacht Elegante pushing back water.

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And sometimes it takes going a long distance to find a Bronx-built yacht like this 1937 Consolidated named

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Sea Spray.  I’d love to see her under way.  For more Bronx built boats, click here.

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Ditto . . . in the same Chicago marina . . . this Chris Craft.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I choose to interrupt the “go west” series here.  It will continue soon.  And why?  Late yesterday, emerging from the fires over in Sarnia it came . . .

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to enter the Black River.

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Draken‘s a beauty with carved European oakwood

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like above on the bow cap rail and below on one of many oarlock covers.

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Below it’s the captain to the right and the district 3 Lakes Pilot to the left as

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international crew prepares to slips the dock lines and

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head northward into a stormy Huron night.

This series handles my miscellaneous needs with updates, follow-ups, and oddments.

Let’s start with the mage below.  Click on it and you’ll learn how soon a sixth boro GUP vessel transforms into dive attraction named Lady Luck.  Thanks to Mike Hatami for passing along this info.

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If the image below looks like a boat, it is, or it was before San Francisco grew (or tumbled?)  over top of it.  For more info on the buried vessels of SF, click on the image.  Here’s more.

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Below, well that was me about 10 years ago.  After I had built a skin-on-frame kayak, I need to paint the porous “skin” with urethane, hence the respirator.  If anyone’s interested in buying me a token of appreciation to update this vessel–which I still have–click on the image to see my one-item wish list.  And thanks in advance.

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More old business . . . the photo below I took from the Manhattan side of the East River about 10 years ago, and

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this photo was taken by Robert Silva back in September 2014; of course this was what remained of the John B. Caddell after Hurricane Sandy, the suspense,  and the subsequent auction.

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By now, that old steel may have seen the hold of a scrapper like Atlantic Pearl . . . and been transformed in the heat

And finally, in response to a recent comment asking about Gateway tugs . . . the rest of the photos/text here I took/wrote in April 2014 and never posted because I was waiting for some additional info.

“What’s under the ‘white house’ here?

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Click here to find out.   And the tug C. Angelo is resplendent in the brightening daylight.

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So this is future defense works passing obsolete defense works.”

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C. Angelo in drydock?

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All photos except the top three and the one by Robert Silva . . .  by Will Van Dorp.

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