You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘virtual gallivant’ category.

Quick . . . name the fourth largest port in Florida?  The answer is here.  And I’ve long wanted to visit it, and my our good fortune is that recently friends–Allan and Sally–who are excellent photographers did, and here are some they share.   Click here for a photo of Cangarda they took and here for some of disintegrating ferry Binghamton.

The closest thing to Betty K VI in the sixth boro is Grey Shark.  And once I noticed Lygra, but only once.  Betty K VI–built in then-Serbia in 1988– measures barely over 200 ‘ loa.

0aaaamr10

About the same size but Danish-built in 1974, La Flecha.  She was originally Patricia S, changed in 1985 to Patricia Star, 1992 to Patricia S, 1993 to Sea Chariot, 1994 to Patricia Star, and 1998 to Sara Express, when it became La Flecha!  I wonder what the real stories are.

0aaaamr2

Ditto the much changed but inadequately painted Borocho, although I had to look

0aaaamr3

to the bow to decipher that. Borocho is even smaller than two previous, built in Japan by Honda Heavy Industries in 1977.   She was originally Yamato Maru No. 12 until 1993, then Pai Chang until 1996, then Quininde until 1998, Floreana until 2000, Genovesa until 2008, Niaski until 2012, and for now . . . Borocho.

0aaaamr4

A similar vessel is the better-painted, old design Wave Trader, here at the stern of La Flecha.  I haven’t been able to locate much more info about Wave Trader.

0aaaamr1

Lady Philomena, Norway-built in 1956,  has born 10 previous names, which you can read for yourself here.  As I write this post, she is underway from the Miami River for points southeast.

0aaaamr5

Directly forward of Lady Philomena when Allan and Sally took these photos was Eva. Built in Norway in 1968, she has been Marina Dania, Erik Boye, Katla, and Miss Eva Ii before her current designation.

0aaaamr6

0aaamr7

A giant and a youngster, Miami Super dates from 1992 and measures just over 275′ loa.  As of this writing, she is in the approaches southwest of Santo Domingo.

0aaaamr8

OK . . . I need help with this one.  Maybe it’s deliberate obfuscation?

0aaaamr9

Family Island . . . sounds like an amusement park, but it’s a LaPaz-registered 1978 Danish-built small freighter, previously known as Ardua, Atlantic, and Queen Sea, in that order.

0aaaamr11

One more and this photo taken by Rich Taylor off Barbados, it’s the vessel currently known–so far as my info serves–as Rudisa Global.   Built in Spain in 1970, she’s since been called Manchester Merit, Manchester Merito, Fortuna, Kathleen, Kudu, Cement Two, Fortune R, and Libera.   Rudisa Global has recently been embroiled in some drug issues.

0aaaamrRUDISA GLOBAL Barbados 020815 - sc-2

Many thanks to Allan and Sally as well as Rich for these photos.  The Miami River intrigues me more than ever now that my appetite has been whetted.   I’m happy to see commerce persisting until some of these may end up as memorials on a beach somewhere like this one.   Or this.  Maybe then covered over like this.   Or never to be seen again . .  very deep-sixed.

And if these pics create a hunger for stories, some of this might be satisfied by Alvaro Mutis’ Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll.

 

Two years ago, I wrote about Columbian tugs here, and alluded to reading of some new ones in Colombia here.   Here and here –one more here–are some others from the great river in the Northwest.   Thanks to the Maraki crew, here is some activity from along the northwest corner of South America.  Click here to read Maraki‘s account of conditions in this corner of the Caribbean

The big tug Atlas, built in Japan in 1991, seems to have trolling rods deployed, or am I seeing that wrong.

0aaaaas1

Tayrona is from 2014 and Peru built.  Click here for more of the fleet.

0aaaaas3

0aaaaas6

GPC Tesoro is China built in 2013.

0aaaaas4

0aaaaas5

Here they escort Baltic Pride out to sea on a run to the  . . . Baltic.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Pino, China built 2007.

0aaaaas8

0aaaaas9

And Tortugas, RORO heads for the Canal, where I saw her about three years ago.  I have lots more photos of her there I’ve never used.  I wonder how long before Atlas‘ lines go tight with something huge.

0aaaaas2

Colombian Coast Guard interceptor boat?

0aaaaas7

All photos compliments of my sister.

A few more Colombian tugs can be seen here.

Technically, I’ve never finished my posts on watersheds 12 and 13 . . .  the troves of photos from those places have simply been preserved by photos that followed and those stories remain to be finished . . . like most things in life.

The photos here, all from Maraki . . .  , offer a focus other than how much ice chills the sixth boro, an interesting enough topic but one that I need to get away from periodically.  Come inside, sip some chocolate, and contemplate the equatorial zones.  Like Rio Magdalena.

I’d seen the Magdalena on maps . . .

0aaaamap

 

but never imagined what floated there. . . until then photo below led to Impala, an entity I’d never heard of before.

0aaaact1

And that summoned info on where the tugs there come from, a question easily answered  . . . thanks to this internet thing.  Behold Impala  Zambrano and Impala Puerto Wilches.

0aaaact2

Traffic like this coexists with the global economy.

0aaaact4

East of the mouth of the Magdalena a dozen and some miles lies Santa Marta, where Atlantico awaits . . .

0aaaact3

as does Chinook and

0aaaact5

and RM Boreas.

0aaaact6

Atlantico and Chinook are built in China.  I’m not sure about RM Boreas.

Two more from these waters from now . . .. Intergod VII.  Any guesses on place of construction?

0aaaacct

 

I’m not sure where the Bauprespilotos get their boats like Voyager, but Intergod VII

0aaaactt2

was built in Collingwood, Ontario in 1967.

Many thanks to Maraki for creating the desire to explore yet another watershed.  For the latest dispatches from Maraki–above and below the water and during Curaçao’s carnival . . . click here.

 

I believe I took this in summer 2005, my first view of Lincoln Sea from W. O. Decker.  Lincoln Sea is now making its way northward probably along Baja California, if not already along alta California.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A few days ago and from the crew of Maraki–aka my sister and brother-in-law–it’s Salvatore in Santa Marta, Colombia.

0aaarrt1

And in the same port . . . Atlantico assisting Mosel Ace into the dock.

0aaaarrt3

From Seth Tane . . . Alaska Mariner in Portland on the Columbia . . . river, that is.

0aaaarrt2

And the next few from Fred Trooster and Jan Oosterboer and taken in Amazonehaven section of the port of Rotterdam less than a week ago . . . the giant Thalassa Elpida assisted into the dock by FairPlay 21.  The two smaller boats are the line handlers.

0aaaarr4

Click here for a post I did four years ago showing FairPlay 21 nearly capsizing.

0aaaarrt5

Tailing the giant is Smit Ebro.

0aaaarrt6

0aaaarrt7

Rounding today out . . . it’s W. O. Decker, Viking, and Cheyenne . . . before the tugboat race in September 2010.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Thanks to Fred, Seth, and Maraki for these photos.

What?  Photoshop?

0aaaanm1

No, it’s not .  . . here’s the namesake, which has its own namesake.

And another . ..  evidently named for a ghost town.

0aaaanm2

Here’s another.  Was Florida settled and named by witty folk with an unusual sense of humor?

0aaaanm3

It looks like Dump Key was the toned-down version . . . .  Here’s a bunch more of Keys-nomenclature.

0aaaanm4

And here is the wikipedia take on odd names.

Many thanks to JLF for sending this along.

I’m loving this.  Please send more fun with charts and even maps and signs.

On predicted weather days, you might be looking at charts while passing the waking hours, waiting.  And you might see unusual names . . . like Cholera Bank, about 10 miles out from

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Jones Inlet.  Why would someone name such a location after a plague gets explained here, and some statistics on numbers of deaths here.   Given that explanation, you might expect an Ebola Bank in the future . . . somewhere if not here.   But seeing

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

this odd name on the chart recalled other odd names like these:  Bald Porcupine Island and Ile d’Amour off Maine, Pot Island off Connecticut, and North Dumpling Island, NY.  Then there’s Ono  (Oh no!) Island, Alabama, and of course one of my all-time favorites . . . Galivants Ferry, South Carolina, which prompted this detour (scroll through) some years back.

Speaking of gallivants, a friend in Netherlands sent me this photo yesterday as we hunkered down as Storm Juno approached.  The photo below shows a convoy of tugs towing inland barges navigating a track through the Schie, a waterway in Rotterdam, a place I visited when I gallivanted there last May.

0aaaan3

This is not exactly the same section of the Schie, but I’ve never shared these photos.

0aaaan4

0aaaan5

Nor this one of feeder container vessel called Temptation passing under the Erasmusbrug.   If you want to see a beautiful 14-minute video of a restored century-old Dutch sailing vessel traversing the canal system between Delft and Rotterdam  . . . ending up near the Schie . . . click here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And since we are now many miles off our original course, what unusual or inexplicable charted or mapped names have you seen?  Please share some.

All photos, except for the black/white one and the bicycle one, by Will Van Dorp, who wonders who Jones was.

Many thanks to Ashley Hutto for this photo . . . gotta move a scow across skinny water?  Only five feet at high water?  Here you go.  Ashley took the photo in Tampa Bay.

0pp2

And thanks to my sister aboard Maraki . . . which departed Trinidadan waters yesterday.  It’s Island Intervention, a Vanuatu-flagged oil well stimulation vessel.

0pp1

Also, a tip of the hat to Aaron Reed of Crewboat Chronicles for this photo;  it’s Sea Durbin, 43′ vessel from 1950 and built by Alcide Cheramie, and with

0pp3

very similar lines, here’s Wyoming, a 57’6″ beauty built 1940 by Camley Cheramie, a photo I took here almost three years ago.

0pp5

I’d love to see her interior.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And here’s another repeat from a few years back . . . I’m still looking for info on her previous life.

0pp6

Photos not attributed by Will Van Dorp.  For the others, thanks much to Ashley, Aaron, and my sister.

Unrelated, check out this NYTimes story about a Queen Mary –and its namesake from half century ago– moving through NYC yesterday on its way to California.

Back in Trinidad, what is NEC Pride escorting in . . . along

0aaaatr1

0aaaatr2

NEC Spirit?

0aaaatr3

It’s Global 1200.

0aaaatr4

It’s Sea Strength .  . . part of the A. R. Singh fleet.

0aaaatr5

Also in that section of the port, it’s Falcon Explorer.

0aaaatr6

All photos come thanks to my sister.

Here was 17.  Click here or use the search window on the left to revisit all the posts in this series.  All photos in this post come from my sister currently in the Gulf of Paria, off Trinidad, a place calling me .  . I feel it!

This isn’t the only tug named Tenacious, but look at the rest of the fleet here.    It looks like Culloden started life as Chindit.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I can’t identify the vessel over near shore.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The orange vessel in the distance is Ramform Atlas, a truly usual design, as wide as it’s long;  you have to look at the images in that link earlier in this sentence.  No matter how functional Ramform is, to someone too long at sea, seeing this approach, it would truly seem a hallucination.

0aaaatt1

For more info on Janus, click here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

To the left . . . Marfret Marajo operates for a company I’ve not heard of.  To the right, in unmistakeable ECO colors, it’s Edison Chouest!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Many thanks to my sister and brother-in-law for these pics and for planting the idea of gallivanting off to the Golfo de Paria . ..  soon.

 

Let’s start with LT-5 at the H. Lee White Maritime Museum.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s The Chancellor at the NYS Canals dry dock as it was being flooded.   Here’s a recent tugster post focused on this vessel.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Now the marketing name for this “tug” is a “barge pusher.” 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s a closer up of the engine unit and hydraulic-driven thruster, operating near Rotterdam Junction.

0aaaarrt3

From Maraki in St. Eustatius . . .  it’s Triumph.   notice the submerged tug off to her port side.

0aaaarrt3a

0aaaarrt3b

Here . . . tending the piledriver in Amsterdam is Sarah L_Anne . . .  I can’t quite make out the name.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Also from Maraki, it’s Statia Reliant off the Leeward Islands of the Caribbean.

0aaaarrt4a

Back to the waters just east of Lock 11, it’s Wm. Donnelly tending a scow.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Thsnks to Ashley Hutto, this photo of Buccaneer, taken Tampa.

0aaaarrt1a

And to end where we started . . .  it’s Oswego’s LT-5, accented by crepuscular rays.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

x

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 638 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

May 2015
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 638 other followers