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Not all pink container ships are huge, not all are ULCVs.    ONE (Ocean Network Express) is a huge alliance of vessels, some of which started out as MOL vessels, and of those, some have lost the MOL to ONE prenom, as is the case with ONE Maxim.

Even on an overcast morning, the pink magenta looks quite bright. I’d not noticed the coated licorice version of a stack until now.

It’s been several years since I stopped at this park in Elizabeth NJ across from Howland Hook to see containers being shifted while

taking on fuel. Teu capacity on ONE Maxim is 6724, less than half that of a fleet sibling ULCV.

Like I said, even on an overcast day, she still has this flaming magenta color.

All photos, WVD.

 

Talos.  Know the reference?  I didn’t but will share the response at the end of this post.  It’s entirely appropriate for the very automated  and largest in physical size class of container ships to call in the sixth boro, 1211′ loa.  In fact, another ship of the class is recognized as being (in 2019) as the largest vessel to pass through the new Panama Canal locks.  That ULCV, Triton, has been in the sixth boro several times, once just recently, and I’ve managed to miss it each time. The diminutive tug off the port quarter is Vane’s 95′ Susquehanna with a barge on the wire.

Entering the boro means passing the lighthouse on Norton’s Point, aka Seagate.

Another clue to the length of Talos comes by comparing it to the VZ Bridge tower, which rise up nearly 700′.

 

 

I’ve seen photos of Triton, and it has the same blotchy paint.  Anyone know why?

She headed west on the ConHook Range with four McAllister tugs, although none of a tether.

I chose not to follow her through the KVK, so maybe Capt. Brian A. got on the tether here.

Note the size of ferry JFK alongside Talos. JFK has a loa of 277′.

Talos here heads for Port Elizabeth;  over beynd her is Al Qibla, another ULCV.

All photos, WVD, who offers this link on the five Triton-class boats.

Engine here is the AN Diesel & Turbo B&W 11S90ME-C9&10.

Talos, a robot, . .  . has quite the legacy, which you can learn here.  He was finally defeated by the guiles of MedeaHere‘s the contemporary, non-marine Talos.

Also arriving in port before dawn this morning is the CMA CGM 15000 ULCV I’ve not yet seen, CMA CGM Panama.

 

I recall my first time seeing the KVK, astonished by the density of commercial traffic.  Of course, I’d just come from northern New England’s freshwater meandering rivers, surfable sandy coastlines, and marsh creeks. 

Patrice steamed westbound, light,

Kimberly eastbound,

Josephine,

Daisy Mae, moving a half acre of scows…

Helen Laraway,

Daisy Mae again a few seconds later.

But to put it all together, here are Pegasus, Josephine, and Cape Henry

Pegasus and Patrice,

Josephine, Kings Point, and Cape Henry….

It was a busy morning.  All photos, WVD.

 

In a real way, this post is about cargo also.  Look at this top photo . . .  any guesses what’s unique about the cargo?

This is the only the second time I post a photo of Double Skin 510A, here pushed by Wye River, but it’s the first time I call attention to it as an asphalt barge.  In other words, cold as it was outside, the cargo in the barge is

being transported at a scalding 300 degrees F.  Unless you knew, you might not have imagined that.  This hot product might finally cool off when it’s squirted with some crushed stone into a pothole somewhere.

You can tell the temperature out by the snow accumulated on the stern of Genesis Glory, here with GM 11105.

Soon afterward, she spun around and

left the barge at the dock.

I’ve seen this tug in several liveries as Sea Bull and Labrador Sea, as well as without  and then with an upper wheelhouse

DBL 25 appears here for the first time though.

In the years I’ve been doing this photography, I’ve learned a lot, and have paid attention to different things as I’ve learned new things.  Barges are the money makers.

All photos, WVD.

If you subscribe to Professional Mariner, you’ve seen the article I published there in the March issue.  If not, it’ll be available online in a few weeks.

 

It’s January 31 or -1 February.  since it’s a short month, it needs another day.   The temperatures where I’ve been have been colder than -1 centigrade.  So let’s do it . . . photos from a decade ago, February 2010.  See the crewman in the netting dangling over the side of tanker Blue Sapphire?  He appears to be touching up paint on the plimsoll marking.  I wonder why I didn’t add this to a “people on the boro” series,  which started in July 2007 with this.  Today, the tanker is northbound along the west coast of Malaysia, and sailing as Marmara Sea.  Oh well, stuff changes.

Here’s a fair amount of dense traffic:  Norwegian Sea is eastbound, Conrad S westbound, and an Odfjell tanker is tied up at IMTT.   Looking at my archives, I have a “dense traffic” series and a “congestion” series that probably should be collapsed into one series.  May I’ll do that on a snowy or a rainy day.  Dense Traffic goes back to February 2012 here, and Congestion series started in March 2011 here.  Norwegian Sea has been renamed Miss Rui and sails for Smith Maritime Ocean Towing and Salvage Company.  Conrad S is now Iris Paoay, leaving Davao in southern Philippines.

Cape Bird is getting lightered (or bunkered??) by Elk River and barge DS 32.

This was a congested scene as well;  note beyond Cape Bird  APL Sardonyx and Eagle Service with Energy 13502.  Eagle Service is now Genesis Eagle (which on the radio sounds like Genesis Sea Gull).  The 1995 APL Sardonyx is now just Sardonyx and is tied up in Taiwan.  Maybe at a scrap yard?  The 2003 Cape Bird is now Tornado and tied up in Lagos.

Crow is no more . . . having been turned into scrap like that loaded on the scow she’s pushing here.

Ever Dynamic is inbound under the original Bayonne Bridge, with Laura K assisting on the Bergen Point turn.

Gateway’s Navigator was a regular towing submarine sections between Rhode Island and Virginia. 

Here’s Navigator towing Sea Shuttle, which may or may not have something under the shelter on the barge.  Navigator is now Protector, out of New Bedford.

Arctic Sunrise was in the sixth boro for a Greenpeace “show the flag” event.  Since then, she spent time detained in the Russian Arctic . . . the Pechora Sea.  Later released, Dutch authorities took the detention to the World Court, and Russia was fined 5.4 million Euros over the detention.

All photos were taken by WVD back in February 2010.

 

That more tankers and fuel barges arrive in the sixth boro in the colder months is just my hunch;  maybe someone reading this can supply numbers to prove or disprove this.  It would make sense, given that there’s the need for heating.  In any case, let’s look at some vessels in town in recent months.  By the way, here was the first post of this series.   One of these is arguably misclassified here;  see if you can determine which.

Afrodite was a frequent and controversial visitor here a few years back.

 

Note the person climbing the ladder from a Millers Launch launch.  Also, can you explain the T on the bow?

Overseas Mykonos, despite its name,

is a US-flagged vessel, assisted by Mary Turecamo. However, when launched in 2010, she was registered in Majuro.  I have to admit that I need a “big picture tutorial” on shifting ship registries, aka reflagging.

In the morning light as thousands of cars make their way (upper left) along the arteries called parkways and expressways, Grand Ace9, launched in 2008,  has been here before–never on this blog though, as Eagle Miri.  I’ve not seen Eagle tankers in the harbor in years . . . possibly some of the older ones have been scrapped.

 

Maya, like Afrodite, is a TEN tanker, “TEN” expands to Tsakos Energy Navigation. See the T on the stack? Maya is of a smaller class of TEN tankers, and has switched registry from Maltese to Marshall Islands.

Orange Ocean is a regular in the port, and the only Liberian tanker in this batch.

Seapike has been here before.  For full context of this vessel, check Michael Schmidt’s site here . . . for Seabass, Seacod, Seatrout, etc. . . you get this gist. Also, note a Millers  Launch launch, maybe Emily, along the port side.

The green stripes near the bow mark this as a BW Group vessel, one of many that call in the sixth boro.

One series has names like BW Panther, BW Puma, BW Bobcat . . . you get the idea.  The founder of the company was Sir Yue-Kong Pao, who started in the family shoe business.  Although you’ve likely never heard of him, he made Newsweek’s cover in 1976.  The company is currently run by the founder’s son-in-law Peter Woo, who was on Forbes cover a few years ago. 

Rounding this post out, shown in the breadth of the Upper Bay, it’s Aegean Star.

She’s the newest of vessels in this post, launched in 2019.

All photos and research, WVD.

And if you said that Orange Ocean was misplaced here, you’d be right, since the liquid she carries is edible . . . or potable.

Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

I’m fortunate to live within easy distance of all this activity:  Nathan G, Treasure Coast, B. Franklin Reinauer, an ULCV, Doris Moran, and who knows how much is obscured behind these . . .  And then there’s the crane atop the building to the left and the gull lower right.

Or here . . . Margaret Moran and a tanker off her stern.

Or here, HMS Justice and Mary H  . . . .

Philadelphia outbound with her barge and Ava M. McAllister inbound with an ULCV.

Mister Jim crosses in front of the slower moving Captain D with a Covanta barge.  Note the cranes at Caddells, with the diagonal lines off the left from  Left Coast Lifter.

Jonathan C Moran, Doris Moran, and Kimberly Turecamo . . . follow a ULCV and 

and here head east for the next job.

Tugboats cross.

 

All photos, WVD.

Having seen the forecast for December 25, I did my watch on Christmas eve.    These are the latest sunrises of the entire cycle . . . photo taken around 0745, and the sky was still reddish and offering very little light.   Fort McHenry and survey boat Christina cross. Yes, Christina . . . namesake you know who. 

Diane B was pushing John Blanche deep in the water with heating fuel.

Fort McHenry passes my station.

Ocean Endeavour was heading in ahead of the strong winds . . . or maybe just to be at the dock for Christmas.   Note the Staten Island ferry off her starboard and a tip of Twin Tube off port stern.

 

By now, it’s a little after 0800.

Twin Tube is the ultimate sixth boro Christmas boat;  there’s no Santa or reindeer, just a competent captain and enough horsepower to get alongside ships.

The reindeer . . . they’re atop the tarped salt pile.   Santa may have abandoned the sleigh, however.

All the above photos were taken before 0900.  The photo below. . .  it’s W. O. Decker, currently getting work done upriver, but ensconced between Wavertree and  work barge Progress a few years ago . .  .

All photos, WVD, who wishes you all Merry Christmas and gifts of life, health, and happiness however you find it.  And one more . .  . bravo to the Normandy crew for the decorations.

Hell Gate has to be one of the most storied waterways in the sixth boro.  How could I have mostly ignored it so long?!!

The other day I caught Vinik No. 6 and Liz Vinik westbound  through that section of the East River.   In the background, that’s the Bronx.

An indicator of current is the fact that NYPD boat here is barely making headway.  Current in a tidal strait like the so-called East River is constantly and dramatically changing.  That’s Manhattan in the background.

Nicholas Vinik also passed through the other day, returning from a job.  That NYC DEP GUP headquarters in the background.  The Hell Gate RR Bridge seems in need of some paint.  Referencing this part of Hell Gate, captbbrucato describes it from a captain’s perspective here.

A recent development is the transit of NYC Ferry service through the Gate to the Bronx on the Soundview run.

Wye River heads eastbound to retrieve a barge, meeting

Cape Canaveral and DBL 101 on the way.

Along the shoreline here, that’s Astoria Queens to the left, and Manhattan along the entire distant background.  Most iconic is the spire of the Empire State Building.

State Trooper . . .  I’m assuming that’s a government boat.

That’s it for now.  I hope to return to Hell Gate soon.  All photos, WVD. 

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