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This post is a direct follow-up to one I did a week ago, documenting the 270-nm trip from Kings Point NY to Norfolk aboard USMMA Sailing Foundation vessel Tortuga.  This post documents the second and final leg of the trip to Tortuga‘s winter berth in New Bern NC, a 179-nm trip from Norfolk.

Let’s start here.  Departure time on day 1 is 1100 h. If you think the navy vessel in dry dock looks familiar, well . . . it visited the sixth boro in May 2012, and I toured the ship DDG 57 USS Mitscher at that time here.

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A USN presence is pervasive along the Elizabeth river portion of the ICW, but the Norfolk Naval Ship is

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technically in Portsmouth. The vessel above is AS 41 USS McKee

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Click here and here for info on the Elizabeth River, technically a tidal estuary.  Click on the map below to get interactivity.

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Here McLean Contracting Co. tug Fort Macon works on the replacement of the Steel Bridge in Chesapeake VA.

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I was surprised to learn there’s a lock in the ICW, the Great Bridge Lock.  I was even more surprised to learn the USACE contracts the operation and maintenance of the lock to a company called US Facilities.

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I must read more about the ICW, but in WW2 it proved a safe route for commerce when enemy submarines preyed on vessels offshore.

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Paradise Creek pushes oil along the ICW today; when I started this blog,  it was a regular workhorse in the sixth boro of NYC.

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The color of ICW water is determined by natural tannins.

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The ICW is composed of wide open bays and sounds–which have narrow channels-as well as narrow cuts.   Here Evelyn Doris of the ICM fleet pushes a covered barge–soybeans, I’ll wager–northbound, possibly to Norfolk.

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Ahead is the US Rte 64 Bridge over the Alligator River, a swing bridge.

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Note the proximity of the photo above to the Atlantic Ocean.

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Tannins in the Alligator River water create this color.

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North Carolina today protects a lot of its coastal wetlands. Hunting is permitted, and in fact, VHF radio picked up a lot of communication with folks hunting in there.

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Parts of the ICW flow through cuts like the Alligator-Pungo Canal.

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This moment of arrival in Belhaven meant a lot to me, because just around the point in the center of the photo is the hospital where I was born. I hadn’t known it, but Belhaven also considers itself the birthplace of the ICW.

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Departure time on day 3 was 0600, Jupiter and Venus were higher in the sky than the rising sun.

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Aurora Mine looms over the Pamlico river. Potash export happens through Beaufort,  documented on tugster here and here a few years back.

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See the mine area on the south side of the Pamlico River below.

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Hunting abounds here.

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Note the spelling. 

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Belhaven used to support a fishing fleet.  I’ve no idea how the size of the fleet and market in Hobucken has fluctuated over the years.

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Day 3, early afternoon we depart the Neuse River for the Trent by passing through the Cunningham Drawbridge.

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Tortuga is docked here for winter.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Again many thanks to the USMMA Sailing Foundation for inviting me to crew in winter relocation for Tortuga.

Here are the previous posts in this series, and I’m finding that in the four years since the last installment, things have changed . . . and not.  Most of these boats haven’t appeared in the previous four.    The livery and logo remain the same, but there are some new boats.  Can you figure out how two of the following photos differ from then others?

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Chesapeake, launched 2006

Once while listening on VHF, I thought there was a new boat in town called “honey creek.”

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Hunting Creek, 2011

 

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Quantico Creek, 2010

 

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Wicomico, 2005

 

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Red Hook, 2013

 

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Tangier Island, 2014

 

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Fells Point, 2014

 

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Susquehanna, 2006 with Savannah

 

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Christian . . .  1981

 

So, obviously, Christian, being a crew boat, differs from all the others.   Another difference, though, is that Chesapeake and Susquehanna were not photographed in the sixth boro.  Identifying one location might be easier than the other.  Guesses?

By the way, I know I’ve seen Kings Point, but I seem not to have a photo.

Answer soon.

Bravo to the organizers and participants of the 2015 NYC race.  It starts with a muster…

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L to r:  Catherine Miller, Robert E. McAllister, Eric R. Thornton, Mister T, Buchanan 1, and Buchanan 12

which looks  different as you shift perspective.

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Add Red Hook and Sarah Ann, with a jet ski for scale.

 

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Add Thomas Witte.

 

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Take a close up on Mister T with John J. Harvey in the distance.

It’s great to see race newcomers like Sea Scout Ship 243 out of Rahway NJ, and

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Patricia.

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By this point, some boats like Robert E. McAllister start to get impatient.

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Muster then turns into a procession,  filing straight toward the starting line and

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showing the colors

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as some newcomers catch up.

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James William used to be a Moran boat.

Next stage . . . it’s the tension on the starting line, feet digging into the starting blocks and muscles tensing, sort of.

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There are 11 boats here, including Margot pushing a set of rock barges and not racing.

They’re off!

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and water starts to cascade away from the bows…

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froth by the ton.

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But when the quick minutes of the race have elapsed, the first boat down the course is the impatient Robert E. McAllister.

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And almost as in a triathlon, the dash down the course changes and the pushing starts.

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All manner of paired struggle ensues.

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And we need to leave.  All photos here by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to Bjoern and crew for my ride.

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For as multipurpose as sixth boro waterways are in summertime, my perception is that safety prevails.  RORO, barge on a short wire, and canoe stay well apart.

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Ditto here with spacing.

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PWCs . .  I’ll never be a fan.

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Foreshortening masks the fact that from a vantage point like Fort Wadsworth . . . I can see over 10 miles.

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The traditional ship here was launched in 1997;  the tug beyond  . . . in 2001.

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My only question is where that classy yellow sand is going.  TZ Bridge?

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m not going to count, but there must be dozens of posts here with photos from or some mention of Paul Strubeck.  Here I’m pleased to dedicate a whole post to him in part because these photos make me see the sixth boro with new eyes.  Enjoy.  Cornell . . . by foggy night and compare to my photo from about the same day but at dawn here and scroll to the third photo.  The location is the soon-to-open Brooklyn Barge Bar, where I’m eager to imbibe a sunset beer. Also in Paul’s “roll” of film are

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Pinuccia and Specialist mostly obscured,

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Captain D ,

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Nanticoke passing the East River Seaplane base,

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an unobscured photo of Specialist,

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Sea Robin secured to Sugar Express at the sugar plant in Yonkers,

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James William,

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and Foxy 3 pushing a Thornton barge, which

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brings us back to a great photo of Cornell, which Paul used his special lens for.

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All photos here are used with permission from Paul Strubeck.  Thanks much, Paul.

Unrelated:  Here’s an East River seaplane photo I posted here many years ago. And a photo of Sugar Express towed south by a former fleet mate of Sea Robin.

USMMA Foundation vessel Tortuga needed hands for a transit from Kings Point to Newport RI, where it is serving as support for Warrior Sailing program races this weekend.  I didn’t wait for a second call. I just needed to get there by 0250.  No problem, since this IS my favorite time of “day.”

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tug Elizabeth Anne at 0236 h.

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sunrise from the bridge of Tortuga at 0502.

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Past Port Jeff ahead of ferry PT Barnum  0638

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Passing Bruce A. McAllister with Vane barge on the wire along North Fork 0937

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Meeting ferry  John H near Plum Gut at 1002

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Seeing a distant ferry Cape Henlopen (?) and  S/V Mystic Whaler off New London 1030

Many thanks to Chris.

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UNREP from M/V Otter for second breakfast at 1035

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Passing S & S yawl Black Watch off Fishers Island 1042

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F/V Skipper off Point Judith Light 1259

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Schooner Aurora near Newport  1352

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Tortuga at rest as Warrior Sailing crew moves in 1615

 

Many thanks to Jonathan Kabak for the invitation.  All photos here by Will Van Dorp, and I have many more.

Click here for numbers on Long Island Sound.   Actually this trip involved the Sounds of Long Island, Block, and Rhode Island.

 

Here were some of the previous Mary Whalen moves.  And here was one return.  A few days ago, Mary Whalen moved into Atlantic Basin, where the 70th birthday party was held and public access will be much easier than it has been for future programming TBA.   This post shows pics taken onboard during the move;  I hope to present more soon.  The day started early at the pier which has been home for a long time.

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0734 hr

Prime mover this time was Quantico Creek, tailed by Christian . . . way in the distance.

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NYMediaBoat and Christian were part of the escort, as

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as was Shipshooter with his latest equipment to follow and film

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“We have lift off.”

the pirouette in the Buttermilk Channel and a

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0914

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NYMedia Boat captures the action from starboard side of Quantico Creek

hook into Atlantic Basin, where in September 2009, Portside helped host a huge Dutch barge party.

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Once she’s all fast, may the programming begin.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Read the press release here from PortSide NewYork.

For some great Red Hook history and historical images, click here.

 

If you think the sixth boro has a wide variety of tugboats, you’ll agree it’s also surrounded by a variety of land–boro–scapes.

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l to r:  Thomas J. Brown, 1962 and Joyce D. Brown, 2002

from obscure to iconic.

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Eastern Dawn, 1978.  Previously Delta Mule and Grand Eagle

Here’s the Brooklyn passenger terminal and

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Evening Star, 2012

the anchorage in mid-Upper Bay,

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Nanticoke, 2007

Brooklyn Navy Yard,

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Bridgeport, 1982.  Previously, Dragon Lady and others

Williamsburg,

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Miss Gill, 1970.  Previously Mister Mike, Samson, and other.

Bayonne,

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Eric R. Thornton, 1960.  Previously Roger Williams

east end of Wall Street,

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Pelham, 1960.  Previously Little Joe, Tucana, and other

entrance to the Kills showing the Bayonne Bridge and obvious modifications to the bases,

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Eastern Dawn again

and finally the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges.

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the Browns again

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

 

Seven and a half years ago I posted on APL President Truman and  even longer ago tugster did this on Bellavia.

Enjoy a few more pics of President Truman before learning its fate.  The photo below was taken in September 2007.

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March 2009.

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June 2009.  Dimensions on President Truman are 902′ x 129.’  As such, she could not traverse the current Panama Canal.   Teu capacity on Truman is about 4500.

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In the foreground in the photo above, of course, that’s Capt. Log, now retired.  The assisting tugs are shown below.  McAllister Brothers nearer and  . . .I can’t identify . . . astern of her.

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Here from May 2009 is sister vessel President Polk, assisted by Ellen McAllister and McAllister Sisters.

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Both Polk and Truman are no more.  Nor are Adams and Jackson.  All dead.  Click here and scroll to page 41.  They were all renamed President 1, President 2 . . . and taken to Chittagong for scrapping.   I’d love to find photos of these vessels being scrapped.

Which brings us to this past weekend. And this vessel.  Teu capacity is over 8000.  Dimension 1095′ x 138.’  See the crewman standing watching on the bow . . .

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Near the salt pile they pass, Zim Monaco 4250 teu.

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Now that the process of raising the Bayonne Bridge has become, maybe some folks will imagine widening the KVK.  By the way, if you see little difference between Pacific Link and the Presidents, count the number of containers across the stern.

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And an 8000 teu vessel, as appropriate as it may be for some locations, is “compact” compared to what already sails the oceans–20,000 and up–and what is being planned: 25,000 teus and up.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  MSC Oscar

Size at LA-LB

 

 

Kodiak . . . is ex-Vane and Allied.

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Hunting Creek is Maryland-built for Vane.

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Charles A has carried at least four previous names.

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Specialist, I believe the oldest in the set today,  . . . has low sleek lines for an almost 60-year-old vessel.

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When this Pegasus came into the sixth boro, she lacked the upper wheelhouse.

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Atlantic Salvor has for some years–since this one left–been the largest tugboat in the sixth boro.  Rivaling Atlantic Salvor a few years back was the rescue tug turned super yacht called Lone Ranger.

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And finally, for today, it’s Eric McAllister passes Ultra Colonsay, discharging salt over at Atlantic Salt.

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All photos over the last few days by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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