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In the drizzle, BBC Alabama awaits cargo in Port of Albany.

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Pocomoke transfers cargo,

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Brooklyn heads south,

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Hudson Valley sentinels keep vigil no matter

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how much rain falls,

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Doris hangs with Adelaide,

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as does Coral Coast with Cement Transporter 5300,

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Strider rests from striding,

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Union Dede docks at a port that 10 years ago was sleepy,

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HR Pike (?) rests on rolling spuds,

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Saugerties Light houses B&B guests,

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not far from Clermont, home of the father-in-law of the father of steam boating on the Hudson and then the Mississippi,

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Comet pushes Eva Leigh Cutler to the north,

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Spooky‘s colors look subdued in the fall colors, and

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two shipyard relatives meet.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos in a 12-hour period.

So the difference that makes the “really” is that several folks have contributed these photos.

Starting in Toronto with Jan van der Doe, here’s M. R. Kane, which has appeared here and here previously on this blog.  In the first link, you’ll see Kane towing the hull that would become tall ship Oliver Hazard Perry.

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Next three photos came from Allan Seymour, who took them as he traversed the Cape Cod Canal recently.  This Independence is rated at 5400 hp.

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Bohemia and barge wait to pass.

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And Buckley McAllister shares escort work on the Canal with Independence.

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The rest of these photos I’ve caught recently, all of tugs I’d not previously seen.  Miss Ila came through the sixth bork Saturday,

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Miss Lizzy I saw Friday, and

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Performance I saw in Massena earlier this month, and

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Robinson Bay.  These last two are operated by DOT’s Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (SLSDC), which is looking to replace these aging tugs.  Robinson Bay (103′ loa and built in Wisconsin in 1957) and Performance (50′ and Indiana, 1997) do maintenance work on the US portions of the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

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Thanks to Jan and Allan for the first photos here.  All the others are by Will Van Dorp.

You’d have thought I use this title more often, but it’s been almost three years since it last appeared. I’m starting with this photo of the lightship WLV-612, because this is where I’ll be this evening for a FREE and open-to-the-public 6 pm showing of our documentary Graves of Arthur Kill.  Seats for those who arrive first.

Over the years I’ve done many posts about the WLV-612, but my favorite is this one.

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Here’s a very recent arrival in the sixth boro’s pool of workboats . . . Fort McHenry, just off the ways, although just yesterday an even-more recent arrival.  more on that one soon, I hope.  I don’t know how new Double Skin 315 is.

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Ships in the anchorage and waterways must think they are in a tropical clime, given the temperatures of August 2016.

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NS Parade, Iron Point, MTM St Jean …  have all been here recently.

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Robert E. McAllister returned from a job, possibly having assisted Robert E. Peary.

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MSC Lucy headed out past

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Larry J. Hebert, standing by at a maintenance dredging job.

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MOL Bellwether, all 1105′ loa of her, leave into the humid haze, existing here along with

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some wind to propel this sloop.

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Finally, just the name, sir;  No need for the entire genealogy. This photo comes compliments of Bob Dahringer.

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Thanks to Bob for the photo above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Summertime and the living is easy . . . and Sassafras is bringing fuel to MSC Marianna.

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JRT Moran is preparing to assist MSC Busan out of its berth

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Another section of Rockefeller University’s River Campus is shipping in aboard Witte 1401 moved by Emily Ann, 

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passing Zachery and Jason Reinauer and

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and Dean.

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Crystal Cutler moves Patricia E. Poling westbound . . .

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Brendan Turecamo assists MSC Busan back out

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on its way

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to Norfolk.

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All photos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp, who is leaving the area for a while.  Details tomorrow.

 

Here are previous posts with references to wind.  Sunday and Monday were windy but commerce went right on.

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The weight of these units is manifested by the smooth ride in the harbor chop.  Offshore it would be a different matter in the swells.

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I wouldn’t call it spindrift, so maybe

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it’s just spray?

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All photos last weekend by Will Van Dorp.

And here, thanks to Aleksandr Mariy and unrelated but interesting, it’s Black Douglas, in its many forms.  And if you like that, you’ll love Roosevelt, especially that photo off Newburgh NY.

And finally, thanks to Isaac Pennock, who caught Dylan Cooper down bound passing Detroit on a run between Green Bay and Montreal.

Given the history and range of projects of Elsbeth II, you might imagine how thrilled I was to see her for the first time yesterday.  And she has to be among a small set of working vessels based in North America with brightwork!  She truly fits under the category exotic.

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I saw this tugboat six years ago in the Delaware River, but Sarah D looks spanking new  in NYS Marine Highway colors.

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Happy flag day.  Do you know the significance of this date?

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OSG Courageous, she’s one large tugboat and an infrequent

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visitor in this port.  I can’t quite make out the barge name. Of course, she’s not as colossal as her big sister –OSG Vision–who spent some time here . . . four (!!) years ago.

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Sassafras is a fixture in the sixth boro, but she rarely looks as good as she does when many shore dwellers in the other boros are just waking up.  Here she

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lies alongside Petali Lady.

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Mister Jim here is lightering (?) bulker Antigoni B, who seems to have since headed upriver.

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And since this is called random tugs, let me throw in two photos from the Digital collections of the New york State archives . . . SS Brazil entering the sixth boro on May 31, 1951.  What the photo makes very clear to me is how much traffic in the harbor has changed in 65 years.   Can anyone identify the six tugboats from at least three different companies here?  I can’t.

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Here the party passes a quite different looking Governors Island.

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All photos except for the last two by Will Van Dorp.  These last two come from a treasure trove aka Digital Collections of the New York State Archives. 

Unrelated:  If you’re free Saturday, it’s the annual mermaid migration on Coney Island.

 

Here were previous snapshots of sample small craft on the sixth boro, a city of water all summer and all other seasons as well.  Here one of the four-season RIBs of NY Media Boat passes along the western margins of Brooklyn, where a lot of folks congregate in the evening.

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Manhattan is one of Classic Harbor Line‘s vessel.

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Crew launch Christian works all summer and all other seasons too.

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Tara heads under the Brooklyn Bridge as light fades.

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Fish appear to be active over where Kate used to chum with food scraps.

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And this skipper seemed to enjoy pushing his craft against the currents in Hell Gate.

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And there are so many other small craft in all parts of the sixth boro.   All these photos taken recently by Will Van Dorp.

Land mass area can be quantified in square miles, but I’d love to work with a mathematician to measure the area within NYC limits which is navigable, i.e., the sixth boro.  Of course, “navigable” would need defining too. Immeasurable, of course, is the number of photos  taken daily of vessels with the sixth boro.

Like this one of Crystal Cutler pushing

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Patricia E. Poling westbound at the Brooklyn Bridge.

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Taft Beach pushes BMLP 703 and 305 in the opposite direction.   Also working recently have been

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Paul Andrew with scrap,

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Sarah Ann with more scrap,

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Thomas D. Witte with crane barge Columbia,

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James E. Brown with a spud barge,

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and Fort Schuyler in various locations.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated, here’s an interesting video on the salvage of  Modern Express . . . passed along by JM.

Also, as we near the mermaid parade, here are details on a performance to get you in the mood, an adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s the “Fisherman and his Soul.”

 

This collage of orange and blue indicates that something unusual approaches . . .

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0846 hr . . .

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0904

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Atlantic Salvor might have been headed out on a long range mission, but

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at this point, I realized this mission would begin in the Lower Bay of the sixth boro along with

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lots of other vessels, although

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something new this year was the escort of four commercial tugs:  Sassafras, Miriam Moran, 

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Atlantic Salvor, and Normandy.   1150.    I was happy to find someone to talk to.

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It’s fleet week NYC.  Welcome all.

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It’s USS DDG 96,

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HMCS D 282,

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WMEC 911,

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HMCS MM 700,

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HMCS MM 708,

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LHD 5,

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DDG 99,

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and LSD 43.

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At 1216, Eric McAllister joins the welcome party . . .

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WLM 552.

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An E-2 flew by too.

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The message on the port wheel well ((?) amused me.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was last year’s arrival.

 

Yesterday was National Maritime Day.  At the edges of the Upper Bay, people associated with the maritime industries gather for a memorial.

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at Marisol Escobar’s American Merchant Mariners’ Memorial statue.

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Two of the newest tugboats in the sixth boro–Fort Schuyler and Kings Point, named for two area maritime academies–stood off.

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Service and sacrifice were honored.

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Prayers and

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other words were offered by SCI’s Rev. David Rider and Marad’s Paul “Chip” Jaenichen.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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