You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘USACE’ category.

Here’s Ocean Traverse Nord, 213′ loa and a trailing suction hopper dredge built in Quebec City in 2012.

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photo taken on St. Lawrence in June 2015

Here’s Manhattan, trailing suction hopper dredge built in Sparrows Point in 1904, hull #43.

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And this is Atlantic, hull #44, also from Sparrows Point.

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Finally, Dodge Island, loa 275′ and built in Slidell LA in 1980.

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photo taken off New Jersey in November 2015

Thanks to Barrel for the archival photos;  the two color photos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  click here for lots of photos of vintage USACE dredge equipment.

 

Alpha is the caption on the photo, but there’s no 1928 boat by that name on this list.  Might it also have been called Captain Eric Bergland?

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Convoy is one of the four sisters delivered by Leathem Smith in Wisconsin in the spring of 1941. I love the coil on the hawser rack.   I posted photos of wo of the four sisters side by side in this post a few months back . .  scroll.

0aab2Corps tug convoy (1952)

You can read here a story of Evanick, christened in 2006 by the widow of its namesake.  Here’s the Professional Mariner story of her, comparing the Texas-built Evanick‘s power (3000 hp) as twice that of Raymond C. Peck, the vessel she replaced. Peck became Martha T and , unfortunately, made casualty news here in March 2013.

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Bluestone Drifter is not much unlike the self-propelled scows (SPS’s) used extensively on the Erie Canal.  This “crane boat,” as the USACE calls it, comes from Utica IN in 2001, making it much newer than the SPS’s on the Canal.

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Grand Tower, also Indiana-built, was commissioned in 2001.

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Prairie du Rocher is a 2002 product of the same shipyard as Grand Tower and Bluestone Drifter.

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Ditto Sanderford, 2005.  I’m starting to want to make a trip along the Ohio visiting shipyards  . . . soon.

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Iroquois, delivered in 2005 from a Louisiana shipyard, operates from the Nashville USACE yard.

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Barrel calls this Racine, but I can find no info about a newish USACE tug called Racine.  Anyone help?

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J. C. Thomas is a 2000 product of Jeffboat, also along the Indiana bank of the Ohio.  Click here for another product of Jeffboat, Cape Henlopen, some folks’ favorite people mover. Is it true that Jeffboat is considered the largest inland ship builder in the US?

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I don’t know the date of this photo of Derrick Boat #7 and tug Pilot, but the style of the derrick is quite similar to what is used in the Erie Canal.

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And finally for today, there’s an unidentified USACE tug pushing dredge William L. Goetz.  Anyone have an ID or an idea?

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Many thanks to Barrel for these photos.  More of them to come . . .

For an article on what is claimed to be the largest diesel towboat operating on the Mississippi–I’m always skeptical about superlatives–click here.  That article actually describes what could be called MV Mississippi V.  The largest one I’ve ever seen is MV Mississippi IV, now pulled up on a bank in Vicksburg, MS, a museum.  Enjoy these photos I took there three years and four days ago.

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She hardly looks her 75 years, but as I walked across a marina in Baltimore earlier this fall, I had to turn my head and

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look a little closer.  Other than that she’s Chas. D. Gaither, I can’t say much else.

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But I can tell you something about her namesake and one of those responsible for saving her.  Click here for the Gaither story and here for a restorer’s story.

It appears that Gaither‘s builders, Spedden Shipbuilding, also built Driftmaster (1949) and Wilhelm Baum (1923), which sank at the dock nearly two years ago.  Does anyone know what has become of Baum?  All photos here by Will Van Dorp.   I took the Baum photo back in 2008.

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Click here and scroll to see the oldest retired NYPD launch I know of, Patrolman Walburger  aka Launch No. 5.

Earlier this “classic boat” month I posted contemporary photos of Millie B, ex-Pilot, USACE.

The first two photos below and the last one come thanks to “Barrel.”  I can’t accurately characterize what each is;  I’ll leave that to you.

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The middle two photos below come compliments of William Lafferty, frequent commenter, here, who writes, “[This photo] shows it at work, escorting McAllister tugs moving the sections of a floating drydock on the C & D Canal in April 1966.  One can barely see her Smith sister, Convoy, aside the drydock on the left in the foreground.”  Anyone care to speculate whether the nearer McAllister tug is none other than John E. McAllister, now known as Pegasus?  Also, where were these dry docks headed?

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And, “[This] one shows it at Fort Mifflin in January 1996 while, obviously, still with the Corps.”

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Here Pilot awaits off the port side of Goethals, built in Quincy MA, and used from 1939 until 1982 and scrapped in 2002. The category here–sump rehandler–sent me on a chase for answers that ended here.  New Orleans–the sump rehandler–was also built as a dredge in Quincy in 1912 before conversion and use until deactivation in 1963 and eventual scrapping.

0aab3Pump out DB#41 New Orleans Goethals Tug Pilot

Finally, last photo is from Barrel, and shows Pilot Palmyra showing a crane barge through the C & D Canal.

0aab4Pilot & Palamra Towing Titan Crane Barge C&D Canal - Copy

Thanks to Barrel and William Lafferty for these photos.

Interested in self-unloading vessels as seen here on tugster?  Read Dr. Lafferty’s book.

Which leads me to a a digression at the end of this post:  Day Peckinpaugh once had an self-unloading system.  Does anyone know the design?  Are there photos of it intalled anywhere?  The photo below I took in the belly of D-P back in September 2009.

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How about this to follow yesterday’s post . . .  this Pilot was one of four completed by Leathem D. Smith Towing and Wrecking Co. in Sturgeon Bay WI in March and April 1941.  Actually, the paint on the bow notwithstanding, she’s now called Millie B. 

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Here she is just showing off some bare ankle in the lift at Viking Marine.

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Here’s a photo of her on the Rondout  thanks to Paul Strubeck–it’s cropped slightly differently from the previous time I used this photo–along with Spooky, the second of the four completed by Leathem Smith in spring 1941. The first time I saw this boat was here in August 2013.  She spent a lot of time in Philadelphia, so I’ll bet my friends on the Delaware have photos of her also.

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Thanks to David Black for the photo of Millie B in the slings just above Paul’s photo.

 

This post is a direct follow-up to one I did a week ago, documenting the 270-nm trip from Kings Point NY to Norfolk aboard USMMA Sailing Foundation vessel Tortuga.  This post documents the second and final leg of the trip to Tortuga‘s winter berth in New Bern NC, a 179-nm trip from Norfolk.

Let’s start here.  Departure time on day 1 is 1100 h. If you think the navy vessel in dry dock looks familiar, well . . . it visited the sixth boro in May 2012, and I toured the ship DDG 57 USS Mitscher at that time here.

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A USN presence is pervasive along the Elizabeth river portion of the ICW, but the Norfolk Naval Ship is

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technically in Portsmouth. The vessel above is AS 41 USS McKee

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Click here and here for info on the Elizabeth River, technically a tidal estuary.  Click on the map below to get interactivity.

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Here McLean Contracting Co. tug Fort Macon works on the replacement of the Steel Bridge in Chesapeake VA.

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I was surprised to learn there’s a lock in the ICW, the Great Bridge Lock.  I was even more surprised to learn the USACE contracts the operation and maintenance of the lock to a company called US Facilities.

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I must read more about the ICW, but in WW2 it proved a safe route for commerce when enemy submarines preyed on vessels offshore.

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Paradise Creek pushes oil along the ICW today; when I started this blog,  it was a regular workhorse in the sixth boro of NYC.

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The color of ICW water is determined by natural tannins.

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The ICW is composed of wide open bays and sounds–which have narrow channels-as well as narrow cuts.   Here Evelyn Doris of the ICM fleet pushes a covered barge–soybeans, I’ll wager–northbound, possibly to Norfolk.

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Ahead is the US Rte 64 Bridge over the Alligator River, a swing bridge.

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Note the proximity of the photo above to the Atlantic Ocean.

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Tannins in the Alligator River water create this color.

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North Carolina today protects a lot of its coastal wetlands. Hunting is permitted, and in fact, VHF radio picked up a lot of communication with folks hunting in there.

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Parts of the ICW flow through cuts like the Alligator-Pungo Canal.

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This moment of arrival in Belhaven meant a lot to me, because just around the point in the center of the photo is the hospital where I was born. I hadn’t known it, but Belhaven also considers itself the birthplace of the ICW.

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Departure time on day 3 was 0600, Jupiter and Venus were higher in the sky than the rising sun.

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Aurora Mine looms over the Pamlico river. Potash export happens through Beaufort,  documented on tugster here and here a few years back.

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See the mine area on the south side of the Pamlico River below.

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Hunting abounds here.

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Note the spelling. 

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Belhaven used to support a fishing fleet.  I’ve no idea how the size of the fleet and market in Hobucken has fluctuated over the years.

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Day 3, early afternoon we depart the Neuse River for the Trent by passing through the Cunningham Drawbridge.

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Tortuga is docked here for winter.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Again many thanks to the USMMA Sailing Foundation for inviting me to crew in winter relocation for Tortuga.

or GHP&W 6.  Traverse City is home to the Great Lakes Maritime Academy, training in the freshwater watery North Coast of the US.   All photos today come from Isaac Pennock, currently a cadet at GLMA, and principal behind the tugboathunter blog.  Click here to see many of Isaac’s photos taken on and around the Great Lakes aka North Coast.

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Anchor Bay (1953) started its life as a USACE tug, not unlike W & D’s  Little TootSpooky and Pilot, now Millie B.    Other GLMA vessels include

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Northwestern, 56′ loa aluminum vessel,

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a 41′ utility boat,  and their big

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vessel, T/S State of Michigan, the former USNS Persistent, T-AGOS-6.

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Tenders called in the port of Traverse City recently, with intrepid explorers—well, tourists–from

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a German cruise ship called Hamburg .

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Shorefolk ventured out in kayaks, perhaps to trade with folks aboard the ship?

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Another recent visitor in the port was Canim, dating from 1930.

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Again, for these photos I’m grateful to Isaac, a GLMA cadet.

Here are previous posts under the category second lives, a designation I use for vessels that are significantly modified from one owner or role to another. The approaching vessel in the next two shots–which I took on the Erie Canal west of Three Rivers in September 2014–show Grand Erie, the newest (built 1951!!) and largest tug in the Erie Canal.

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Look at that low Erie Canal design carefully, because

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she started life looking like this photo probably taken in 1951 when she was brand new in Pascagoula.  That’s probably the open Gulf of Mexico in the background.

All the black and white photos in this post are credited to Boat Photo Museum.  If anybody wants 8×10 photos, they are $5.00 each, plus postage through the Museum.

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Chartiers was considered a dredge tender.  Here she’s pushing a scow somewhere in the Pittsburgh area.

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And here she’s tied up at the Corps of Engineers repair base at Neville Island, Pittsburgh.  Look carefully at the upper superstructure in this photo, pre-1985.

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In 1985, the vessel was purchased by the New York canals system, then still called the Barge Canal.  The name changed in 1992.  Then, Chartiers traveled to New York state from the Ohio River via St. Louis, the Illinois River, Chicago, and the Great Lakes.

Here’s Dan Owen’s description of the photo:  “This is how it [looked] when I first saw it going up the [Mississippi] Aug. 13, 1985 at St. Louis.  It was on the other side of the river.  The top part of the pilothouse roof was actually cut off to the level of the second deck cabin to get under the bridges in the Chicago area. I do not know how long the pilothouse was 100% air conditioned, all the way from Pittsburgh, or at a shipyard in the St. Louis area. Or, if the pilothouse was welded back on after clearing the Chicago bridges.”

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Here’s more of Dan’s description:  “These two photos show Chartiers departing Chain of Rocks Lock, Granite City, Ill.  [Notice the helm,] complete with searchlight, sitting on the deck. Also visible are two spare rudders.”

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For more comparison, below are three photos of Grand Erie I took in September 2015.  In the photo she’s flanked by Tender #3  starboard and tug Waterford to her port.

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Compare this photo of Grand Erie to the second b/w photo above to note all the changes.

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And compare this one to the last b/w photo above.

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Many thanks to Dan Owen of Boat Photo Museum for use of these photos.  All color photos were taken by myself, Will Van Dorp, in 2014 and 2015.

Here’s how you might be able to add to this collection:  in July 1986 the newly modified Grand Erie came to NYC waters  aka the sixth boro to participate in Liberty Weekend, the rededication of the Statue of Liberty.  Grand Erie served as Governor Cuomo‘s ride.  Does anyone have photos from that time  . . . Grand Erie in NYC in 1986?  I’d love to see them.

Here are previous posts with photos by Paul, who decks on Cornell

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which does most of its work on the Hudson.  Deborah Quinn (1957) has been here several times, the first here.

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Here’s old and new side by side in Red Hook Erie Basin, Scotty Sky and Chandra B.

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And some old boats together, Spooky, Pilot, and Gowanus Bay. Click here for one of my favorite sets of photos involving Gowanus Bay.  Pilot and Spooky (as Scusset) both came off the ways in Wisconsin in spring 1941 as USACE vessels.

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Evelyn Cutler first appeared on this blog as Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

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I don’t know the story of the seaplane landing on the Rondout on the far side of Cornell, but soon I will be putting up a photo I took last weekend of a seaplane on the St. Lawrence.

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It’s that time of year, with hints of

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the dark side.

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Many thanks to Paul, who took all of these photos.

Safe travels.

Here’s the index.  Here and here are some from far enough back that you can note change on the sixth boro.

Any ideas on the photo below?  I believe that’s Robert Burton in the background?

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Here’s the rest of that image.  The two photos come from Bjoern Kils of New York Media Boat, which has the story on their blog here.

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This photo comes from Ashley Hutto, and shows what I would deem a risky rowing feat over between the tanker Fidias and unseen a barge landing at Bayonne.

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I’ll have more Pacific Link photos tomorrow, but the crewman in yellow jacket and orange hat no doubt circles the globe like some of us circle the town.

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Count them . . . three crew members standing watch.

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Three fire fighters on M4, one of

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four FDNY RIBs out on training.

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I didn’t see the crewman at this point, but I heard him banging on metal structure with a crowbar . . . there under the third row back.

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there.

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Still see him?  I still heard his banging.

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Greetings to the Shelby crew pushing scows northbound.

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Driftmaster crew make a visual assessment of floating debris.

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Way up high there on Torino . . . crew with a white apron, that’s not something you see every day.

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Hail to the chef!

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Here a crewman contemplates the state of the universe from the afterdeck of Laura K Moran.

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Harvesting goes on in the springtime boro.

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Crew of Stolt Sapphire pose for pics on the stern of their parcel tanker as the skyline of Manhattan cliffs passes by.

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And here’s a good bookend to this post, which could otherwise go on and on.  Best wishes to Team Ocean Valour . . .

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All photos unless otherwise attributed by Will Van Dorp.   Thanks to Bjoern and Ashley for their photos.

 

 

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