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Jake Van Reenen captured this procession yesterday on the upstream end of the Thousand Islands.  The photos are not bright, but that’s appropriate for a trip of this sort.

The you see a ship with towlines fore and aft and new paint splotches that appear to be covering something . . .

it means only one thing . . . “…Le Marc…”

towed here by Jarrett M and Lois M  (1945 and 1991)

used to be Quebec ferry Camille-Marcoux . . .

bound for Marine Recycling Corp in  Port Colborne, ON.  Maybe I’ll see parts of it there this summer when I pass the yard there.

And if you’re up at the south or upstream end of the Thousand Islands, say hi to Jake. 

When I first spotted this, I didn’t quite know what was happening.

 

Cold as it was, I’d put on enough layers to wait.

I’d call it path creating, not path finding,

Ocean Yvan Desgagnes opening the ice for Le Phil D,  a 1961 Russel Brothers Ltd. vessel.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This is looking down an 18% grade at L’Isle-aux-Coudres.  Note the two ships–Algoma Mariner and an orange-hulled bunker called Federal Tyne–in the narrow channel.  The river is much wider on the far side, but shallower.   A photo of Federal Tyne appears at the end of this post. Tide is out.

Tidal fluctuation here is about nine feet.

See the stack markings on that tug?

It’s Felicia, built 1923 in Sorel, and hasn’t been McAllister since 1965.

I couldn’t get into the shipyard here, but I recognized these two boats . . .

Lampsilis (research) and Theodore (relaxation) from

June 2015 in Trois Rivieres and

Montreal.

 

Meanwhile, farther along the riverbanks but clearly for reflection, these shanties

accommodate folks who fish through holes.

Federal Tyne . . . I caught up with her here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And L’Isle-aux-Coudres, I have to get back there in summer.

 

Algoma Mariner (2011) heads upriver with a load of ore.  This time of year and until the St. Lawrence Seaway opens, Montreal is the head of navigation, so that’s where the ore will be discharged and sent further by rail.

Pilot exchange at Quebec City is facilitated by Ocean Ross Gaudreault (ORG).

 

 

Minutes after the exchange, ORG (94′ x 37′) cuts a swath back to the base

using its 5000 hp through the freshwater ice that’s come down from

Lake Saint Pierre.

Back in September, I got these photos of the pilots’ exchange.

 

For some info on the Canadian Pilots, Laurentian Region, click here.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Lomer-Gouin and

Alfonse Desjardins are twin 1971 ferries, or traversiers operating between Quebec City and Levis, but the organization has ferries between many other points on the St. Lawrence as well.

The word traversiers is easy to trace and associate, but the derivation of ferry is from Norse. 

These are no double ended ferries like those big orange ones in the sixth boro.

And the bow seems designed to ride up on and crush the ice.

Now I don’t know if there are still openings, but the sixth boro will soon have a more inclusive set of ferry stops as well.  I believe you can find the notices here.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who was too late for the ice canoe races this year, but next year, I’ll be there.   You have to see the photos in that link.

Thanks for all the guesses, and here are some photos from the past week.  This was taken at the outset of a steep grade descending into St. Joseph de la Rive and the Isle aux Coudres ferry.

See the ship in the ice between the mainland and the island above;  farther upstream here’s a closer up of Algoma Mariner, and here

an even closer look at what constant ice against the bow does to the paint.

And here’s the winter version of yesterday’s post, looking back at Quebec City.  Some of you were right even down to the street address of the pier.

And traversiers aka ferries between Quebec City and Levis. 

Yes, I love winter.  And this is southern Quebec.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.   For more previous Saint Lawrence photos on tugster, click here.   For photos from Jean Hémond, a Quebecois whose expertise is this environment, click here.

You saw this vessel in an earlier post.  It’s back from the Arctic for the season, most likely.

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We steamed through the night, so here’s our vessel already in Ogdensburg on a rainy morning. The river separating the US from Canada here is about a mile wide.

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There was a time when folks who backed the wrong horse fled the US as refugees.

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The land you see in the background is US.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Again, with limited wifi, it’s mostly photos, these all taken around Montreal.

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Below is the MSC ship we followed on the approach to Trois Rivieres.

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The green hull is loading and the brown, discharging.

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See the grain elevator and the MSC ship in the distance.

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The new Champlain Bridge is going up right next to the old one.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’ll reprise some of these vessels in later posts, but this traffic we passed or followed unbound from Quebec City.

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Umiavut serves the Canadian Arctic.

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Ocean Traverse Nord has been featured in earlier posts.  Here she’s at capacity with dredge spoils from Lac St. Pierre and off to the release site.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m not adding much text in the next few posts.  Why gild the lily or rouge the autumn maple leaf.  When I’m back in the sixth boro, I’ll revisit some of these photos.   For now enjoy Quebec.

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This is Montmorency Falls.

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Amundsen will be breaking ice soon.  Winter is coming.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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