You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Saint Lawrence River’ category.

I’m out of my weight class here, but formulas exist for calculating mechanical advantage of compound pulley systems like this.  I’m just focusing on the task in the north country for this machine.

Grasse River (1958) is dedicated to the Saint Lawrence Seaway and based in Massena NY, along with tugs Robinson Bay (1958) and

Performance (1997).  By the way, road distance from Massena NY to the sixth boro is over 350 miles!!

Perversely or providentially, Grasse River was the last ship produced by American Shipbuilding on the Buffalo River, before the shipyard closed, a victim of the opening of the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

Plans have been set in motion to replace Robinson Bay, but the 300 t. capacity Grasse River is there, on call, dedicated as a “mitre-gate lifter” in the case of damage.  It’s sort of like the tow trucks on the ready at the Lincoln Tunnel to expeditiously drag out a wreck should a mishap occur inside the tunnel.

Seeing the size of the superstructure, I erroneously first assumed Grasse River was self-propelled.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous 21 “specialized” posts can be found here.

And let me add a postscript here about the location in Buffalo where Grasse River was built.  The shipyard was where a vacant lot across the street from Tewksbury Restaurant finds itself today.  The Tewksbury reference here is to one of two “runaway” ships  that destroyed a bridge on the Buffalo in January 1959, a month when no ships were supposed to be traveling on the river.  The ships involved were MacGilvray Shiras and Michael K. Tewksbury.

In that same neighborhood, Harbor Inn once served as a community institution as well.

Buffalo’s First Ward are the focus of an entire blog, as you can see here.

 

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Here are previous posts in this series.

Below . . . could that almost be a dawn or twilight background?  And is that a canot a glace aka ice canoe –with oars instead of paddles–maybe?  Ice canoeing, some would say, is the real Canadian winter sport . . .

Well, no matter how much you squint, that is convincingly a small craft.  The 751′ Espada does a successful job of obscuring the small craft.    Without looking it up, I’d never have guessed that this Desgagnes tanker appeared in tugster here back in February 2013 as Stena Poseidon!!   This connection clarifies to me my often-felt question:  why do some ships call in the sixth boro once or a few times and then disappear forever?   They just get repainted, rebranded, and show up here or elsewhere….

This one was hard to understand until I learned it was started life as a warping tug built 1946.  Click here for some posts I’ve done about warping tugs, aka alligators.

To me, this runabout is the water equivalent of a 1950s sports car like these, in case anyone wants to buy me one . . .

This drift boat, I’m guessing, and I had to shoot it from a bridge through chain link.

New York State Bridge Authority?  I can’t find evidence they own such a boat . . .

This one’s truly intriguing, given the approaching season, but I suspect this is as simple as a pair of hunters with supplies to conceal their duck blind. I did not however see any armed punts or sneak boxes.

And since we started with a human-powered small craft, let’s end here…

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is happy to post any photos of unusual small –or any sized–boats you may come across.

 

 

. . . meaning lacking self-unloading gear, which makes these vessels less versatile.  Manitoba was in exactly the same location–and similarly high in the water–a year ago when I was here.  With her traditional “‘house forward” design, she’s fearless and called a straight decker–having nothing but holds between the ‘house and the engine compartment .

Ditto Ojibway, only slightly younger than I am,

with some quite serious lock, ice, and dock rash.

Contrast them with Algoway, traditional design but with self-unloading gear.

Tim S. Dool, although gearless is generally not considered –as I understand it–a straight decker because it has its ‘house aft.

And what an attractive rake the forward portion of this house has.

Built in 1967, she’s starting to show some age,

on her graceful lines.

Finally, one more gearless vessel, Spruceglen.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to boatnerd for the linked info.  Soon it’ll be time to order your new KYS “boat watching bible.” 

 

Jake Van Reenen captured this procession yesterday on the upstream end of the Thousand Islands.  The photos are not bright, but that’s appropriate for a trip of this sort.

The you see a ship with towlines fore and aft and new paint splotches that appear to be covering something . . .

it means only one thing . . . “…Le Marc…”

towed here by Jarrett M and Lois M  (1945 and 1991)

used to be Quebec ferry Camille-Marcoux . . .

bound for Marine Recycling Corp in  Port Colborne, ON.  Maybe I’ll see parts of it there this summer when I pass the yard there.

And if you’re up at the south or upstream end of the Thousand Islands, say hi to Jake. 

When I first spotted this, I didn’t quite know what was happening.

 

Cold as it was, I’d put on enough layers to wait.

I’d call it path creating, not path finding,

Ocean Yvan Desgagnes opening the ice for Le Phil D,  a 1961 Russel Brothers Ltd. vessel.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This is looking down an 18% grade at L’Isle-aux-Coudres.  Note the two ships–Algoma Mariner and an orange-hulled bunker called Federal Tyne–in the narrow channel.  The river is much wider on the far side, but shallower.   A photo of Federal Tyne appears at the end of this post. Tide is out.

Tidal fluctuation here is about nine feet.

See the stack markings on that tug?

It’s Felicia, built 1923 in Sorel, and hasn’t been McAllister since 1965.

I couldn’t get into the shipyard here, but I recognized these two boats . . .

Lampsilis (research) and Theodore (relaxation) from

June 2015 in Trois Rivieres and

Montreal.

 

Meanwhile, farther along the riverbanks but clearly for reflection, these shanties

accommodate folks who fish through holes.

Federal Tyne . . . I caught up with her here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And L’Isle-aux-Coudres, I have to get back there in summer.

 

Algoma Mariner (2011) heads upriver with a load of ore.  This time of year and until the St. Lawrence Seaway opens, Montreal is the head of navigation, so that’s where the ore will be discharged and sent further by rail.

Pilot exchange at Quebec City is facilitated by Ocean Ross Gaudreault (ORG).

 

 

Minutes after the exchange, ORG (94′ x 37′) cuts a swath back to the base

using its 5000 hp through the freshwater ice that’s come down from

Lake Saint Pierre.

Back in September, I got these photos of the pilots’ exchange.

 

For some info on the Canadian Pilots, Laurentian Region, click here.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Lomer-Gouin and

Alfonse Desjardins are twin 1971 ferries, or traversiers operating between Quebec City and Levis, but the organization has ferries between many other points on the St. Lawrence as well.

The word traversiers is easy to trace and associate, but the derivation of ferry is from Norse. 

These are no double ended ferries like those big orange ones in the sixth boro.

And the bow seems designed to ride up on and crush the ice.

Now I don’t know if there are still openings, but the sixth boro will soon have a more inclusive set of ferry stops as well.  I believe you can find the notices here.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who was too late for the ice canoe races this year, but next year, I’ll be there.   You have to see the photos in that link.

Thanks for all the guesses, and here are some photos from the past week.  This was taken at the outset of a steep grade descending into St. Joseph de la Rive and the Isle aux Coudres ferry.

See the ship in the ice between the mainland and the island above;  farther upstream here’s a closer up of Algoma Mariner, and here

an even closer look at what constant ice against the bow does to the paint.

And here’s the winter version of yesterday’s post, looking back at Quebec City.  Some of you were right even down to the street address of the pier.

And traversiers aka ferries between Quebec City and Levis. 

Yes, I love winter.  And this is southern Quebec.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.   For more previous Saint Lawrence photos on tugster, click here.   For photos from Jean Hémond, a Quebecois whose expertise is this environment, click here.

You saw this vessel in an earlier post.  It’s back from the Arctic for the season, most likely.

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We steamed through the night, so here’s our vessel already in Ogdensburg on a rainy morning. The river separating the US from Canada here is about a mile wide.

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There was a time when folks who backed the wrong horse fled the US as refugees.

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The land you see in the background is US.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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