You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Queens’ category.

All photos today come thanks to John Huntington.  Check out his new site here, one which I mentioned a week and a half ago here.

Here are the basics on what you are looking at, mostly from John’s caption:  “FAR ROCKAWAY, QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY, NY/USA – FEBRUARY 25, 2016: The 24 meter (78 foot) scallop fishing vessel the Carolina Queen III, rests in surf in the Atlantic Ocean off Far Rockaway on the Rockaway peninsula of the borough of Queens in New York City. The boat ran aground at about 2am and all the crew were safely evacuated by the US Coast Guard.”   Of course, there are also the related stories about the USCG 25′ RIB attempting a rescue and capsizing in the 10-12′ seas, and its crew, trained and geared up for such a possibility, safely swimming to shore;  and the rescue of Carolina Queen III crew by helicopter.  Photos here.  A number of the RIBs can be seen here.

0acq1

Salvage plans are underway.  The fishing vessel–to my untrained eye–seems to have held up well, a tribute to its builders as well as to the fact of coming ashore on the sand.  Those builders are responsible for two of the newest tugboats in the sixth boro as well.

0acq2

I’m sure the owners and crew of the vessel feel sick right now.

FAR ROCKAWAY, QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY, NY/USA – FEBRUARY 25, 2016: The 24 meter (78 foot) scallop fishing vessel the Carolina Queen III, rests in heavy surf in the Atlantic ocean off Far Rockaway on the Rockaway peninsula of the borough of Queens in New York City. The boat ran aground at about 2am and all the crew were safely evacuated by the US Coast Guard.

 

0acq3

But looking at John’s remarkable photos, I’m struck by their allure.  The calm water, patches of blue sky, reflection of a beautiful machine misplaced on soft sand  . . .  contrast sharply with how the scene must have appeared to the crews Wednesday night when the wind and spray made the decks feel like hell, a time of uncertainty and fear.

0acq4

I’ve previously done a set of posts on a vessel ashore here.  And from South Africa four years ago, these photos from Colin Syndercombe and another fishing boat astrand.

Thanks again to John Huntington for use of these photos.

For a photo of Rodriguez Boatbuilders’ 2015 James E. Brown, click here and scroll.

For a sense of how shipwreck has attracted photographers of four generations of a British family, click here.

 

Tis the season . . .  to keep your eyes and ears on the weather.  In 1938 . . . before hurricanes had names or we had satellites to track them thousands of miles off, a big one came ashore on Long Island, a once-a-century-or-longer storm.   Do you know this structure below?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s the ocean side view . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

and the inland side.  To the right and up the Acushnet River are the ports of

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

New Bedford and Fairhaven.  Click here for info and photos on the building of the barrier.

The benchmark storm for the sixth boro is Sandy, and an event this past weekend happened on a location wiped out by the storm, Rockaway Beach at 106th Street.  Click here for posts/photos from my friend Barbara that chronicle the before/after in that part of NYC.  Welcome to the first annual Poseidon parade.

0aaaarp1

 

0aaaarp2

and a temporary replacement for Whalemina, the glacial erratic rolled away by Sandy.

0aaaarp3

 

Of the 10 worst hurricanes of the 20th century (judged by impact on the US), almost all happened  in September.  Since that link leaves off Katrina (??), I add this one.

Thanks to Barbara Barnard for the Poseidon Parade photos;  the ones from the Achushnet are by Will Van Dorp, who will have photos from up the Acushnet soon.   Technically, this fits into my “other watersheds” series.

Here was the first post  . . .LNYB . .  being Lower New York Bay.  I’m wondering, though, if this might technically be the corner of New York Bight, not the Lower Bay.    The “sixth boro” nomenclature  . . . blurs the distinction.

0aaaalb3

The Rockaway Lateral pipeline project is . . . partly about pipe.  How the pipe gets “injected” into the earth is illustrated in this video.  Bear with the first 45 seconds . . . the remaining 4 and a half minutes are illuminating.

0aaaalb1

Thanks to a secret salt for these photos of taking on pipe and provisions.

0aaaalb2

0aaaalb4

Here’s a closeup of OSV Michael Lawrence, which first appeared in this blog here.

0aaaalb5

Here are fleet mates.

0aaaalb6

All above photos from a secret salt.  If I’m not way off, the photo below–not so close up–shows Michael Lawrence alongside the “pipe-injector” barge.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This last photo I took on Tuesday.

Here were 1,  2, and 3.  Looking back, my favorite of those three is number 1.  So what are the delights of the East River, other than my longstanding fixation on this aggregate carrier . . . ?

0aaaalic1

Well, clearly I’m not the only one who recognizes how delightful Alice’s presence in the sixth boro proves to be.

0aaaalic2

Thanks to the Long Island City Community Boathouse for these pics long on spirit if perhaps a bit short on focus.  My last trip with LIC Community Boathouse goes back five years already!!  On that Sobro cleanup trip I also took these fotos.

0aaaalic3

These fotos remind me that I’ve yet to get myself to Four Freedoms Park (below) on Roosevelt Island, as well as

0aaaalic4

Ship of Tolerance, which will be at the salt dock on Staten Island this weekend.   In the foto below, Gabby L. Miller is moving the Ship past the United Nations Building.

0aaaalic5

All fotos are compliments of the Long Island City Community Boathouse.

Aug 31.  A late summer day at the beach, where a new “towel drying rack” has been adopted and a bumper crop

0aaaaaug31

of sand awaits the erosion of winter, perhaps?  All photos here taken by Barbara Barnard.

0aaaaaug31b

Sept 1.  A tug (Trevor?) moves a crane barge to where the “drying rack”/piping needs to be fished out for transport to the next job.

0aaaasept1dawn

Sept 13.  The remaining pipe on the beach, no longer serving to dry swimmers’ towels, awaits dismantling and

0aaaaaug31c913

0aaaaaug31d913b

allows for closer inspection.

0aaaaaug31e915a

0aaaaaug31f916

This Rockaway series was of course motivated by Hurricane Sandy and the photos of Rockaway by my friend Barbara in the past 12 months.  Barbara, many thanks.   Here was my Nemo to Flag Day post, which started with a mystery house.

And now it looks like the Nola “make it right” rebuilding plan is coming to the Rockaways.  Click here for the design for “resilient house.”    Here’s an earlier article.

Click here for a project/business entirely created by the devastation of trees during the storm.  It’s not maritime, water,  or even specifically landthreshold related, but is quite interesting.

Here’s where the “leverman” sits for a twelve-hour shift as the C. R. McCaskill slews port to starboard 400′ once each three and a half minutes.   Another way of saying that is  the dredge moves using a five-point mooring system: two swing anchors, two breast anchors and one stern anchor to move forward or back.  A different configuration uses a spudded idler barge;  in this case, the “swing” is longer and takes more more time.   Food gets delivered so that the leverman aka dredge operator can monitor all these screens and respond so that dredging can proceed 24/7 as long as equipment and conditions permit.  More on food later.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Slewing . . . drawing on cables attached to positioned anchors and pivoting on a stern point . . . requires that the 30” diamater hose be able to flex.  Hence, the easy curved slack before the piping to the beach.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The crewboat in the distance alternates between hydrographic survey work and other tasks.  More on that in a moment.  More crewboats in a future post.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Attachment at the stern is a ball and socket joint . . . like your hip.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s the starboard GE engine, part of the power supply to the dredge.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here is another view of the two huge hull-mounted pumps that do the work.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Another task of the crewboat is illustrated here:  recreational boaters sometimes allow their curiosity to override any sense of danger caused by a busy, slewing dredge.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The helicopter happened to be here on assignment to photograph the work from the air.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

About the food, here’s  mission control presided over by Edwina Arthur, a member of the 30-50 person crew.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Food rules and pecking order are clearly posted.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Captain Randy Guidry, my host for this tour,  proudly displays the builder’s plate, Corn Island Shipyard in Indiana, where the hull was constructed.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As I stated in the previous post, McCaskill’s part in the dredging/beach replenishment has now ended and vessels and crew have moved south for the next job.

Many thanks to Captain Guidry, Jan Andrusky, and all the other fine folks at Weeks Marine for this tour.

All fotos, text, and (any inadvertent errors) by Will Van Dorp.

Here and here are previous posts on a Rockaway Beach replenishment dredging operation that has now ended.   Sea Wolf is still local, but the vessel on the horizon (“atop” the red buoy) has now moved to southern NJ.  Remember, for most fotos, doubleclick enlarges.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Weeks’ Trevor was assisting in this project.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Also assisting was George W.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

But here’s the powerhouse, the dredge.  Let’s take a tour.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In spite of about 16,000 total horsepower, C. R. McCaskill is not self-propelled.  To see what towed the dredge to the south, see the foto at the end of this post.    All that power moves the cutterhead on the submerged arm (called a “ladder”) that extends to the sand at the bottom of the Channel here.  At the top end of the ladder are two huge pumps (you could stand inside the pump housing) that suck the sand and whatever else off the bottom and send it as a slurry to a point on the beach some miles away.  Click here for a pdf that shows the beautiful (ok . . . roll your eyes) virgin red cutterhead with green teeth.    Each tooth weighs around 35 pounds!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here inside the dredge are some interesting astounding facts about the machine.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

See the sand colored building on the horizon off the stern of McCaskill?  That’s the area around 105th St. Rockaway Beach where the sand is headed through piping powered by this vessel.  The first few fotos in this post were taken at that beach.  There’ll be another Rockaway post soon.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Candace towed C. R. McCaskill south.  I missed her when she was in town, but John Skelson caught her here.  Click on the foto to see John’s complete shot.  Many thanks to John for use of that shot from his Flickr page.

0aaaaaawt

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except for the one shared by John Skelson.  For more info on each of the Weeks tugs, click here.  More McCaskill tomorrow.

Here’s a followup on the Rockaway sand pumping, and there’s gold in those sands, over $36 million worth.   Notice the dredging/pumping vessel upper right.

0aaaaaas1

This was the fountain this morning.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Once the slurry exits the mouth, water flows back into the ocean and sand is pushed up the beach.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This repurposed container is project headquarters.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The top foto comes thanks to Barbara Barnard;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

I’m back, with lots of gallivanting to catch up, but first . .  a whole lotta fotos from this morning in the sixth boro.  Any ideas what’s going on here?  What is that gray blur in the center of the foto and why are the gulls so frenzied?  Be forewarned . . . this post has so many twists/turns . . . it’s divided into parts, even though I took all these fotos in the span of less than an hour.

Part 1

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Answer:  It’s how over three million cubic yards of sand is being added to Rockaway Beach . .  at least for a while.  Here’s what the NY Daily News says about it.  Here’s an article and video from Dredging Today.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And here . . . off in the Rockaway Inlet are the machines mining and pumping the sand, seen closer up in this recent  tugster post.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Part 2.  Notice  the piping coming from the stern of McCaskill.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I could not resist wondering about these birds whose name rhymes with “lovers.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Part 3.  Follow this sweep of fotos as I turn to the left.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

An Atlantic City billboard on Far Rockaway?  Is a mixed up sense of geography part of Sandy’s legacy?  I keep turning left.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A Potemkin village and that’s an A  Train station to the right?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

See the silvery cars of the A train?  It’s a Boardwalk Empire set in the wasteland of eastern Rockaway Beach . . . . I was hoping to buy some of that food at those prices!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Of course, I had to look behind.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I half expected to find some Aral Sea boats back here too.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Part 4.  Once back on the boardwalk, I saw this fishing boat about a quarter mile from shore.  I’m guessing it’s unrelated to the sand piping and pumping, but   . . . who knows.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Today near Meadow Lake there’s a convergence of dragons . . . similar to but maybe bigger than the one I documented here five years ago.

A half century ago, that lake was the site of the World’s Fair.  And the three images that follow are stills clipped from a short video called Sinclair (as in the oil company today subsumed by Arco) at the World’s Fair, which today we might call an infomercial.   Thanks to all your comments–here and via email–that lead me to conclude that the hydrofoil era in the sixth boro was quite short.   Looking at these fotos, I wonder if any reader here was among the 100,000 passengers transported in the summer of 1964, if any fotos out there could be shared, and

-aaaaaaa2

what this “driver” did after hulls receded back into the water for good.   Thirteen boats–maybe unfortunately named–operated in the sixth boro!  Where did they dock?  Who maintained them?

0aaaaaaa3

0aaaaaaa1

Here’s an intriguing eBay foto, which I’ll not bid on.   Boeing seems to have built a number of hydrofoils–as the Boeing 929.  Of those still operating, most are in Eastern Asia, including these “Seven Islands” boats that once–about a decade ago–tried to establish a run between Florida and the Bahamas.   Seven Islands features an up-to-date crew blog–only in Japanese–that has interesting fotos.  Here and here is info on a hydrofoil operating on the black Sea out of Bulgaria.

Here’s where I’ll leave this until I find out more.

Meanwhile, if I get all my work done today, I may go see the dragons tomorrow.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 970 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

July 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 970 other followers