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Finally, with some wifi and limited time, let me put in photos and fleeting captions from leg 1.  That lady below needs no introduction although she looks alarmed for some reason.

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The TZ Bridge has no traffic jams down underneath.

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Prospector pushes in some bridge components.

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Iona Island has some long unused bollards south of the Bear Mountain Bridge.

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A bulker heads south, as does

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this sloop.

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And this photographer plans his next series.

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as Ocean Tower tows down river with more girders for the bridge.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Earlier this month gothamist.com ran an intriguing set of photos taken by Mr. Cushman.  Here’s his entire archive.  Here’s a good selection.

The warehouses on the opposite side of the river from red vessel below are the current location of Brooklyn Bridge Park.  That makes the pier location a little south of piers 16 and 15. South Street Seaport Museum’s boats today.  Could that be Ollie, the stick lighter currently disintegrating in Verplanck?

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I’m not sure what we’re looking at here, but the Cushman identifies it as 1941.  According to Paul Strubeck, it’s likely an express lighter–a category of self-propelled vessel I was not aware of–possibly operated by Lee and Simmons Lighterage.

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And finally . .  I wish this photo–dated September 1940-– had been framed differently.  Phillip’s Foods is still around, although I’ve never eaten at any of their restaurants or if this is even the same company.  Royal Clover . .  . I can’t find anything about that brand.  And seeing all those cartons in Jeff and the barges, today there’d be a few containers and you’d have no idea of the contents.

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You can search Cushman’s archives here. I cll these “fifth dimension” i.e., time added, photos.

For another treasure trove of photos of old New York harbor, click here.

 

 

Many thanks to Paul for this aerial photo, said to show tugboats idled by the strike that lasted the first half of the February 1946.

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Here’s the verso of the photo, in the case you read Spanish.

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For more context of 1946 NYC, click here for a set of Todd Webb  photos.  If you have time for the 13-minute video at the end of that link, it’s well-worth it also, especially for the quote attributed to O. Henry . . . calling NYC “Baghdad on the subway,” which has a whole different set of connotations in 2015 as in O. Henry’s day.

Click here for more 1946 sixth boro photos by Andreas Feininger.

And since we’re stuck in 1946 for now, check out this Life article with drawings about a 1946 proposal to build a “first-world” airport (my quotes) along Manhattan’s west side covering 9th Avenue to the water and between 24th and 71st!

 

See the decorated Dutch bar?  That’s not something you see every day.

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but July 4 is not an ordinary day.  Just look at all those people at the land’s edge:  “water-gazers” Melville called them, as you can read here with the last sentence of the second paragraph and go through the next two paragraphs.   All wanting to see the decorated Dutch bar?

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Brendan Turecamo, showing the Turecamo flag!

Marie J Turecamo brought a barge of pyrotechnics too.

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Marion Moran–like Brendan Turecamo–brought a barge full to midtown, I believe.

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. . . as did Doris Moran. Again, see the water-gazers fill the esplanade.

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Other tugboats brought other gazers . . . sky-gazers soon.

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like Kimberly Poling and .

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Yemitzis, launched as a PRR tug in 1954.   Click here and scroll to see her original look.

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My goal at the fireworks on Pier 16 had been to get shots of Ambrose bathed in pyrotechnical light, but alas . . . without the right orientation of camera to boat to flashes . . . this is the best I got.

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This photo from July 2012 was what I had imagined I could get.  Well . . . it’s all about a lot of things, including location.   See the different version of this shot of the left of this page and please let’s continue the discussion on the future of Pegasus.

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Speaking of sky-gazers . . . from the back of the crowd on Pier 16, this is what I got.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And if you didn’t see this article in the NYTimes about digital photography and ethics, check it out, even if you just look at the before and after photos.

 

 

. . . with some digressions . . .  .  The photo below of the procession leading to the Roundup comes from Jeff Anzevino.

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Digress to the left . . . on the Troy (Lansingburgh) side through the trees is Melville Park and this sign and

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this house.  If you’re looking for a good read about Melville’s later life on the waters off Lower Manhattan, check out this Frederick Busch historical novel.

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Here’s another shot by Jeff, taken from the 112th Street Bridge.  You might recognize the crewman standing beside the wheelhouse port side.  There are many other posts with photos from Jeff, such as this one.

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From Bob Stopper, exiting lock 27, it’s Roosevelt-late 1920s built-and Syracuse-early 1930s built.   Click here for some photos Bob –and others–sent along earlier this year.

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From Jason LaDue . .  a photo of tender (?) Oneida taken in 2001.   Anyone know the disposition of Oneida?  Click here for some previous photos from Jason.

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And finally, from Fred tug44 . . .  locking through E2  . . . right behind us.  I feel grateful to have an occasional view of self to post here.   Some of you have seen some of these on Facebook.

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Thanks to Jeff, Jason, Bob, and Fred for photos here.

 

Notwithstanding all that . ..    sometimes the thought that a day is the first day in the rest of one’s life is superlatively vivid.    Enjoy my pics and maybe you’ll get this sense also.

Sunday afternoon, Zhen Hua 10 enters the Kills. Does anyone know if “Zhen Hua” means anything?  Note Manhattan and the tip of Bayonne to the left, and tug Brooklyn, Robbins Reef Light, and the boro of Brooklyn to the right.

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The new cranes arriving and the bridge their squeezing underneath are integrally related parts of the same story, as . . .

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… are the cranes and the dredging equipment in the background.  Note tug Specialist in the background

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Margaret Moran tends the port bow.

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Gramma Lee T Moran supplies the brakes and rudder.

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The ship completes its journey of thousands of miles.  Is it true that Zhen Hua 10 arrived here via Cape of Good Hope?

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On the same theme . .  here’s a handsome team of tugs, good paint all around.  Working on a tandem assignment?

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My thought when I read the name on the nearer tug was . . . this is historic . . . Crow‘s last ride;  the Bushey tug might also be in the last mile of its thousands and thousands in a half century of work.

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She’s being escorted in by Emily Ann . . .

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Crow and her sister Cheyenne DO have classic lines!

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Machines on shore were already staged . . . .

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while not far away a last spring seal lollygags on some warm rusty metal, once also a brand new machine.

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And on the other side of Staten Island rubble of a light indispensable a century ago adapts to a new life as a rookery.

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Many thanks to NYMedia Boat.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be transiting himself soon.  Thursday I leave on a grand gallivant, and in early June–if all goes well– I start a new chapter working on Urger, that handsome young centenarian tug you see upper left at the top of the page.

Bravo on the almost immediate and many correct identifications of the hulk in yesterday’s post.

Here’s an undated photo of SS Normandie in the sixth boro passing an unidentified Dalzell (?) tug.

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Photo from John Skelson . . . PT boat eastbound on the KVK.  Notice the onramp to the Bayonne Bridge in this and the next few photos.  Here’s a “hidden NJ” blogpost about Bayonne’s ELCO shipyard.  Here’s a list of vessels built there.

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From the same location, another of John’s photos . . .  destroyer, Great Lakes dredge, spectators,

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and Moran tugs.  Anyone add some info on the destroyer?

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Recognize the bridge?  This photo–from the New York City Archives, as are all the the rest here– is identified as taken in January 1937.  Whaling City then was a fishing vessel.  A vessel by that name operates today as a fast ferry.

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Notice 120 Wall Street.  This photo was taken January 1937 and shows F/V Charles B. Ashley.

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Not much info on this next set . . . . a dredge from a century ago and

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a survey vessel.

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And finally . . . this may be the last of my black/white photos . . . the sign tells all about the attitude of the value of salt marshes a half century ago and before . . .

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Thanks much to John Skelson for sharing his “family archives” photos, and if the fog over the sixth boro today has you staying indoors, go check out the New York City Municipal Archives online gallery.

 

First the specifics . . . 70 Henry Street Brooklyn Heights Cinema tonight at 7 for reception with showing starting at 8.    After the show, stop by at Park Plaza Bar about .1 mile nearby.

So it’s appropriate to lead these NYC Municipal Archives photos off with tugboat Brooklyn.

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Next  in an icy North River  (?) . . . . . . Richmond.

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Launches  Bronx and

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Queens.

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Passenger steamer Little Silver, which ran between the Battery and Long Branch, NJ in the first decade of the 20th century.

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And finally . . . John Scully, a very classy Dialogue (Use the “find” feature to search) built built tug

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And the connection . . . here’s what boats of this vintage look like today in “disintegration experiments” in waters everywhere.  I took these in August 2011 while Gary and I filmed Graves of Arthur Kill.

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Some boats of this time, of course, still operate like Pegasus (1907) and Urger (1901)

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while others try to stave off time so that they might once again like New York Central No. 13 (1887).

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I’ve long subscribed to the notion that getting there should be as thrilling as arriving, so  . . .  let’s continue the ride backward past this 1914 post  . . . to  . . . 1910.

Below . . . it’s the Statue cruise of the day loading where it does today.  Notice a roofed Castle Clinton–formerly fort, immigration center, music hall– in the background left.

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NYC tug Manhattan . . . built 1874!  Now where do her bones lie?

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Steamer Brighton assisted by New York Tugboat Company’s Geo. K. Kirkham.

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Front and center here is Celt  (scroll through) , the yacht with many reinventions that now languishes in a creek west of Cincinnati, waiting for me . . .   There’s lots of intriguing traffic in the background.

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Thomas Willett built in 1908 by Alex Miller of Jersey City for a fortune in the amount of $335,000.

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And finally . . . a 1911 photo of a a vessel captioned as SS Momu . . . .  Tug and pier are also unidentified.  The logo on the stack should help someone.

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That’s it for today.   I hope group sourcing can teach us more about these photos.

More from the archives . . .  aerial of Pier 40 and the Holland Tunnel vent . . . photo said to be taken in 1955.

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Photo said to be “three-masted schooner” in 1937.  Clearly that’s not a schooner there with the GW Bridge in the background.  Anyone know what sailing ship that might have been?

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Photo by Sam Brody February 1938.  Ferry Hackensack foreground with Jack Frost Sugars over on the Edgewater, NJ side.

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Todd Shipyard, 1935-41 . .  .  Here’s a list of what was built there and an aerial view (you may have to scroll horizontally) of what it today is occupied by IKEA.

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SS Normandie . . . headed for the North River piers.

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City of Chattanooga December 1937.

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Brooklyn docks as seen from Brooklyn Heights, November 1937.  Here’s a Munson Lines flyer.

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Here’s the schedule–sorry for all the repetition–for Wednesday evening’s documentary portion of the Art of Brooklyn Film Festival, where Graves of Arthur Kill will be shown.  Gary and I will hang for a while at Park Plaza Bar after the show. It may be mobbed?

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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