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or . . . the final installment from the west side of the Atlantic .  .  .  and I’ll use (what I imagine as) NASA times here, but I’ll modify it from “t-minus” to “U–as in underway” minus and plus.

So, at U minus 53 minutes, there’s a man-basket dangling off the portside.

U minus 48 . . .  a crew boat arrives with the pilot.

U minus 37 . . .

the pilot boards Combi-Dock III,

U minus 9, the crew boat, Nicholas Miller,  departs  . . ., likely off to deliver three technicians departing Combi-Dock III.

Judging from when I first detected “under way – making way” from my vantage point, 1616, the photo below is U plus 11 minutes.  Movement at first was barely perceptible, gauged by watching juxtaposition of Peking masts and background features.

U plus 13.

U plus 14.  The traffic in the background will welcome me when I leave my station . . .  A note on the flags here:   the red one (below) is Hamburg’s flag, and the one high in the mast of Peking (next photo below) is that of Stiftung Hamburg Maritim (SHM).

And finally–I shifted my station about a mile to Camp Gateway, Staten Island . . .U plus 21.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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I passed by this afternoon, so here’s a quick post.  Peking seems to have disappeared in this hold.

But for scale, check out this photo I took while she was on a dry dock at Caddell’s  nine and a half years ago.  See the yard worker in a white protective suit lower right?

photo by Will Van Dorp Jan 9, 2008

Even the masts seem diminished by the cranes.

Safe passage!  And with that I pass her off to spotters off the coast of the UK!

No need for much language here.  I started these photos around 0830.  Despite some rain, conditions were ideal for this loading . . . or engulfing.

Here Dorothy J gently moves the antique barque foot by foot closer to Hamburg.

Combo-Dock III, the engulfer, lies in wait.

Robert IV assists when needed.

Without the zoom, I imagined the gentleman with the yellow helmet to stand by on the helm.

We have 20 meters and closing . . .

 

 

 

With big power on minuscule tolerances, Dorothy J eases her in.

 

 

 

The barque floats gently forward in the hold.

Lines to capstans on the heavy lift ship are doing the work, as the tugs stand by until released from service.

 

 

 

 

 

Peking is now engulfed.  Time is about 1130.  Operations to make fast and secure now begin before they head out into the Atlantic for Germany.

Many thanks to Jonathan Kabak and Jonathan Boulware for the floating platform.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who is thrilled to have seen this today.

I stopped by around midday today.  Trevor had been alongside all morning.  I presume this was loading cargo support materials. Here’s the last post I did where Trevor appeared.   These first two photos are taken from Brooklyn looking across at Staten Island.

Time is of the essence here, but I’ll bet working in the 90 degree F temperatures was draining.

Here’s the prep as seen from Fort Wadsworth.

Reynolds Twin Tube appears to be standing by with supplies for crew and possibly spares.

 

Let’s hope tomorrow proves an eventful day. . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Yesterday at 13:31, Combi-Dock III is in sight . . .

14:04, she approaches the VZ Bridge . . .

 

I don’t know how many crew are on board, but soon they’ll be quite busy until they depart with their cargo . . .

 

Peking–I imagine–will float in here, as through a dropped tailgate on a pickup.

Who is this Peking, you ask?  Peking is a 1911 barque and  veteran of the nitrate trade from Chile around Cape Horn to Europe that has been featured in dozens of tugster posts . . .  but take the time to check out these two:   this post with photos supplied by Joe–from his uncle– show her under sail midAtlantic in 1929 or ’30 . . .   and this post showing her 1975 arrival in the sixth boro aka New York City, on a towline.

I expect Thursday will be spent arranging the cradle and ballasting the ship so that Peking can float aboard on Friday.  As to a little info about Combi-Dock III, click here to see her under construction in 2008-09.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who may post a second time later today.

Recall the BOLO post?  Well, today out of the fog she arrived, albeit with an errand to run upriver first.

After a six-week run from Shanghai, of which about five days has been northbound from Colon, Panama, she checked into the Ambrose Channel this afternoon.

 

Dangling anchor means she’ll probably anchor before proceeding.

Unless I’m proven to have a fake story here, in the next few weeks we’ll see

Peking lose her restlessness and

float onto this long cargo deck.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This may be the one to look for, the one to satisfy the restless Peking transport her back to Germany.

combi-dock-1

It’s not fake news, but I am speculating.   Combi Dock 1 . . . might be the one, even though it’s currently approaching Singapore.  For more vessels of their fleet, click here.

For some previous heavy lift vessels in the sixth boro and beyond, check out tugster’s  Blue Marlin posts, the Swan posts, Zhen Hua, and the Flinter ones.

If you’re wondering about the title . . . BOLO, see here.

By June, I’ve heard, Peking will be in Germany, and after watching the barque in the sixth boro for over a decade, I’d have to go abroad to see her next transformations.  Glenn Raymo, whose beat generally keeps him up river, happened to be having lunch in Bayonne yesterday and caught her move from her berth of the past has year to the one she occupied late last summer.

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Many thanks to Glenn for permitting me to post these here, as not all of you do FB or off you do, are friends with Glenn.   Foxy 3 and Robert IV do the honors with

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the mighty L. W. Caddell on the far side.   Note the salt pile and bulker Sakizaya Wisdom out beyond Peking.

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Many thanks to Glenn for his serendipitous and striking photos.

 

 

Here  are the two previous posts by this title, and more.

Juxtaposed boats invite comparison, allow perception of subtle difference, here between Marion and Doris.

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It also gives a sense of the random traffic patterns, here about to pass the impatient Peking are (l to r) Michael Miller, Charles Burton, and way in the distance Robert E. McAllister.

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Here , a few seconds later, Charles Burton‘s barge CVA-601 is about to obscure Chandra B–on a ship assist?– and Miriam Moran.

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Here, from l to r, it’s Sapphire Coast, Charles Burton, Evening Mist, Ellen S. Bouchard, Robert E. McAllister, Scott Turecamo, and Erin McAllister.   cg2

And a quarter hour later and from a different vantage point, it’s Stena Companion, Cielo di Milano, a Miller launch, Maersk Phoenix, and NCS Beijing.

cg3

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Let’s start with Bjoern’s photos from a month ago just about already.  The New York Media Boat runs almost all year round and provides wet and cold weather gear.

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Actually I took this photo, intending it as a baseline photo for the process of preparing the barque to travel the Atlantic next spring, on the deck of a heavy lift ship. I took this photo near Caddell Dry Dock almost two weeks ago.

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A really gallivanting Larry Seney took the next few photos in Hawaii:  Namahoe,

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Mahi, and

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Hoku Loa.  More info on Hoku Loa can be located here.

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Thanks to Alex Weiss for this photo of Independence.

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Ted M sent this papa smurf aka Pleon photo taken in early August in New Bedford.  Now it’s over in the Arthur Kill.

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And the last photo comes from an East River jogger, Art Feinglass, who took this photo of Navigator passing the old Domino Sugar refinery, an architect’s playground.

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Thanks to Bjoern, Larry, Alex, Ted, and Art for these photos.

 

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