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I did this post just over a year ago; note the prominent change happening in the Manhattan skyline, as seen from the north coast of Rockaway Queens.  The last time you saw the tug shown here was December 2011.  Any guesses what Patty was towing yesterday?  Answer tomorrow.

Most of my views of the rising tower come from my “office” on the north coast of Staten Island.  It looms there, beyond these McAllisters,

Na Hoku,

Caitlin Ann,

Magothy,

Penn No. 6,

Thomas J. Brown,

Norwegian Sea,

JoAnne Reinauer III,

Hayward,

Elk River,

and Resolute.

Unrelated:  Following their own landmarks, a new crop of aeons-old silvery slime has reportedly returned to sixth boro waterways.    What . . . you ask?  Click here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Well, maybe not that different, since I’m not reinventing myself.  But enjoy these fotos, and while looking at them, figure out where you’ve seen this tug before on this blog.  Look carefully.  It took me about 30 seconds to recognize the red tug below as a more pristine version of a tug that appears here periodically.  Fotos were taken in the 1980s by Seth Tane, who generously shares them here.

In its current state, this tug, using the same name, has considerably more equipment on board.  What hasn’t changed is the profile of the Palisades in the background of some of these fotos, taken in or near Hastings-on-Hudson, NY.

This tug today still operates commercially, pulling loads like the one below.

A major change in the tug relates to visibility;  the portholes would make me claustrophobic. However, since the mystery tug was built on the Great Lakes, maybe portholes conserve heat better in winter.   Tug Daniel A. White, below left, has more conventional glass.  Anyone know what has become of Daniel A. White?

If you guessed Patty Nolan, you were correct.  Here’s her current work page, showing her original form.  Click on the following links for a sampling of Patty Nolan fotos from the past few years, like modelling 2011 summer beach fashion, at work in the East River, moving snail-like with house,  and finally . . . for now . . . Patty Nolan outlaw fashionista.

Thanks much to Seth for these fotos from the early 1980s.

Below is a foto (poor quality)  that I took in December 2000.  I clearly had forgotten how barren the Jersey City shore just north of the Morris Canal looked a mere 11 years ago, almost reminiscent of a desert town.  This foto was among a batch my sister handed me at Thanksgiving, but those foto gave me

an idea.  Maybe you have fotos in a drawer, a shoebox, and album, etc. that show some part of the sixth boro and/or vessels there.  And if I may so brazen, tugster would LOVE to see any fotos you might come across and are willing to share.

Here was Something Different 4.

Hercules . . . (keel was laid in 1915)  has never visited the sixth boro and never will, but some rough water

she appears able to handle.  You saw Hercules on this blog a few months back burning some coal to set a towing record here.  Read the narrative here in the July portion of the log here.

The body of water in question here is between Zierikzee (marked with the red balloon with capital A) and Veere . . . on the island off to the southwest.  Also notice Rotterdam, Antwerpen, and Brugge on the map.

Speaking of Brugge, notice what they call this Brugge-registered vessel working on the Rhine?

Top two fotos used with permission from Kees (pronounced “case”) and Ingrid van Trigt;  bottom foto thanks to Patty Nolan‘s own Capt. David Williams.

Finally, tugster made the front page of the Wall Street Journal, and . . . no ATF, FBI, IRS, EPIRB . . . no handcuffs, no raincoat covering my face, no sex or financial scandal, no announcement of  an imminent run for office.  Running FROM office to pick up a copy of the paper sounds like a much better idea.  Lots of thoughts there from Cornell‘s Capt Matt Perricone there too.  See “Old Salt” Rick’s post on the article AND the upcoming 19th annual Great North River Tug Race here;  watch the video and you’ll see some of Rick’s and my footage from a previous race.

Unrelated:  This weekend tugster has dispatched me on assignment/hazardous duty at the Pageant of Steam.

Beat the heat . ..  by imagining change:  well, eastriver suggested the sixth boro annex the Conch Republic.  Hmmm.  Since the sixth boro is an archipelago like the Keys, maybe we could confederate the American archipelagos (besides the two already mentioned, we’d join with the Thimble Islands, the Thousand Islands, the Channel Islands, the Salish Islands, and maybe establish diplomatic relations with all archipelagos smaller than . . . Long Island, giving us many of the Antilles, a smattering of Pacific nations,  the Aeolian Islands and Greek Islands.   I know I’ve left many out, but it’s already sounding like good company in my heat-addled brain.

Or defocus on the scorching temperatures by looking at fotos below?

First one is a “tugster-sighting” just north of the sixth boro snapped by Joel Milton.  Tugster is on the foredeck of Patty Nolan  (1931) sans figurefigure as she tows sailing vessel sans-servingsails Lickity-Split some weeks back, here passing the Englewood Cliffs boat basin, I believe.

Next foto from John Watson . . . Eddie R (1971) towing a mystery barge.  Any guesses its mission?

Answer comes from Les Sonnenmark, longtime friend of the tugster blog:  it’s a cable-laying barge operated by Calwell Marine.  Info on the barge can be found in this pdf . . . starting on the unnumbered page 6ff.    In fact, this barge may be related to the work of Dolphin III in the sixth boro last summer:  click the link to “marine contractor” above the last foto in this post you find here.

Foto by tugster near the Chesapeake City Bridge as 2011-launched Mako ensures Penn No. 81 makes

its way Chesapeake-bound.  More info on the pilotboat in the background soon.

Foto by Jed of Vickie M McAllister (2001) docked at McAllister’s Blount Island yard on the St John’s River .

Foto by G. Justin Zizes Jr. of Kathleen Turecamo (1968)  and

and Matthew Tibbetts (1969) both high and dry at Caddell Shipyard in Staten Island.

Foto from Lou Rosenberg of Aegean Sea (1962) near Rockaway Inlet.  Aegean Sea used to

be called, in order,  Francis E. Roehrig, Jersey Coast, and John C. Barker.

This yard tug in Mayport seems to have a protection  bar, but in spite of the

the numbers on the stern, I’ve found no info on this type.  Fotos by tugster.  Orange bow on the right side of foto belongs to C-Tractor 13.

A final shot of Patty Nolan and Lickety Split headed upriver.

Thanks to Joel, John, Les, Jed, Justin, and Lou.

Only tangentially related:  For info on YTB-832, previously based in Mayport and now possibly in Greece by way of Italy, click here.

And an even less tenuous tangential connection to these fotos of vessels of  La Guardia di Finanza, which sounds like what our government is supposed to do but actually refers to something quite different . . . .  What it is can be found here.

More fotos will be forthcoming from the Conch Republic, a possible future residence.

In case you worried that Patty Nolan‘s figurefigure would go unrefurbished, check this out . .  and just in time for the holiday.  The 1931 vessel is updated, state-of-the-art, and decent!  More Patty soon.    If you don’t get the “figurefigure” reference, well, this is a “headless” and limbless figurehead.

If you’re really coordinated with screen controls, you can tour 1939 Hudson, the only pre-war sea tug museum in the Netherlands.

Here’s Hudson posing with Elisabeth, Netherlands 2011 tug of the year.  Click here to tour Hudson‘s engine room and see the Burmeister & Wain engine.


Ellen McAllister –that nose packs a terrific punch–rafts up with Nathan E. Stewart –now in the Pacific Northwest?–after the 2009 Hudson River tug race;  the 2011 race will happen in LESS THAN two months.

Barbara McAllister (1969, ex-Bouchard Boys, ex- T. J. Sheridan)  here pushes Bouchard No. 282 out of Port Jefferson.

And back in the sixth boro, here’sOSG Horizon and barge OSG 351 on possibly their first foray in these waters.  Assist tug is Elizabeth McAllister (1967).  Horizon is the twin of

OSG Vision.  Another of the design is planned.  Any guesses on the name?

Credits here go to David Williams, Fred Trooster, moi-meme for Ellen and Nathan, Justin Zizes, and John Watson.

And an announcement, this blog leaves on a gallivant tomorrow and may be silent for the better part of a week.  We hope to surface in Jacksonville, Miami, Key West, and Dry Totugas.    Cheers.

But first, see this fabulous set of Flickr fotos of Cangarda, which by now must have passed through the sixth boro . . .

and  . .  from Old Salt Rick, let’s remember today is International Day of the Seafarer.

The waters aka the sixth boro provide the best vantage perpective on many aspects of New York:  the bridges, the architecture, the skyline, even shoreline traffic congestion.  In this shot, Margaret Moran (1979) steams southbound beyond the GW and its red lighthouse as it approaches the Upper West Side.  Dominating the scene for many seafarers, the Empire State Building (ESB), the city’s premiere landmark, señal numero uno,  for the better part of a century.  Anyone know what a premiere Moran vessel assist tug was in  1931 when the ESB was built?  Did you realize the ESB drawings were generated in just two weeks because it had a prototype . . . the Reynolds  Building in Winston-Salem, NC?  (Doubleclick enlarges.)  Some part of the ESB appears in every foto here except the last one, which I didn’t take.

With never-retired Patty Nolan (1931!! same vintage as the ESB) westbound on the East River in the foreground, the background shows the towers of LaGuardia Airport to the left and

ESB immediately to the right of the house.  If you’re wondering why this rear view of Patty, well, she has not yet received her new bikini and–in the interest of tugster’s temporary prudishness, I couldn’t possibly reveal her nudity.  For bikini donations, please email me.

Adirondack  II (1999) scuds along while sails get trimmed.

Miss Yvette (1975)–now fully red–heads eastbound on the East River.

A. J. Meerwald‘s schedule shows them in Bivalve, NJ, two days ago, but I’d identify them as northeast bound entering Long Island Sound, leaving a gray smudge of ESB way behind.

Blue Marlin is 13 days out, as of this posting;  her image will stick in my brain until she returns.  Here the loading that seemed endless about three weeks back.

Dawn foto taken just south of Miller’s yard  captures night lights still blazing on Manhattan.

Leaving Chelsea Piers southbound, it’s replica vessel Manhattan.

Another foto of Dominican cocoa being unloading from Black Seal.  For an excellent set of fotos of the entire project, click here for an inimitable Flickr set.

To round this post out, let’s back to Margaret Moran, making her way south along the Upper West Side.

All fotos taken in the past month by Will Van Dorp.

This “foto” is a capture from Carlito’s Way, the 1993 De Palma film.  This Kosnac tug passes in the background as the Sean Penn character leaves the prison barge Vernon C. Bain.  Can anyone identify the tugboat?

 

Here’s Random Tugs 66.   The foto of Quenames in the Gowanus comes thanks to Vladimir Brezina, the bow of whose vessel intrudes ever so slightly into the bottom of the foto.

Eddie R of Interport Towing and Transportation steams through the harbor with 1 WTC in the background.    More 1 WTC views soon.  Eddie R‘s fleet sibling Lucinda Smith is here.

Maryland . . . northbound toward 1 WTC.

Red Hook Grain Terminal in the background, Christine M. McAllister pushes Reinauer RTC 502.

Elk River exits the east end of the KVK, with white cranes in the background at Global Terminal.

Torm Anne gets ushered in by Gramma Lee T Moran.

Ross Sea pushes a deep-loaded barge.  In the distance, a small portion of the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Farther upriver Patty Nolan finds herself alone at the dock surrounded by a thin layer of ice that

in the brackish water over in Newark Bay would not form.  That’s Port Elizabeth to the northeast.

Last shot:  a nameless pusher tug on the high and dry at an undisclosed location north of the Tappan Zee aka (but rarely) Malcolm Wilson Bridge.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except of course the one by Vladimir.

This foto comes compliments of Lauren Tivey, a poet from Vermont College of Fine Arts.  Question:  where/what?   Note the person in doorway just behind the lion “figurehead.”  Answer below.

Since my goal here is to post unexpected fotos, enjoy this shot of the befigured Patty Nolan, a unique tug itself towing something different last summer.

Behold the sixth boro’s own Dal Lake or Sausalito or Lake Union.    Guess where?

Behold the glorious Gowanus!

And some of its exotic fauna.

These last three fotos come compliments of intrepid paddler Vladimir Brezina, whose fotos have appeared here, among other places.

Lauren’s foto at the top is a restaurant on a barge on West Lake in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province . . . just south of Shanghai.

I have deliberately declined ads on this blog, as you know.  Occasionally, I’m told, the blogging hosts runs them around the margin.  If you  see one of those, I have the same policy as bowsprite . . . posted upper right here:  “mention bowsprite tugster for 15% off your next cutter suction head purchase.”   I understand there’s the 45th iteration of an obscure sports event on TV Sunday (Feb 6) that features ads in order to draw in viewers.  Here are some of their ad examples.

But this post spotlights an ad poster (below) I noticed on the Staten Island ferry.  When I saw the ad, I suddenly understood a spate of news articles of the past months, mentioning an increase in the numbers of large marine mammals congregating around the Narrows. Bowsprite, in fact, scooped this story nearly two years ago, with a foto from… of course … a working mariner.  Here’s a Cornell U article, and only recently have mainstream media caught on  here and here.  Eureka!  I get it.   I know why they’re here.

Whales have been attracted in by lucrative contracts in the advertising sector.  I can see the future, and it involves a lot of breaching, large cetaceans . . . in exchange amounts of krill and sardines . . .  leaping and playing in the bay to show off the text on their sandwich boards or painted or –ouch!! . . . tattooed into their flanks.  If whales can manage flight, we may soon see a Fuji whale or a Goodyear one.  Advertising is vibrant . . .  unarrestible! ever dynamic!

If you’re wondering which obscure team I back for this event tomorrow, my answer is “neither.”  I’m wearing some red underwear and off to drive away the sea beast (or mountain beast) called Nian. Why wear red?  See below the foto.  Why this foto?  Answer comes next week.  A clue though . . .  this foto was taken mere hundreds of feet from where mermaids waddle ashore each summer solstice.

From wikipedia:  “Hongjun Laozu was the monk who is told about in the myth of Chinese New Year. He was the person who captured Nian, the great beast that terrorised the people of China every Chinese New Year.

Every Chinese New Year was a time of suffering and fear for the people of China because of Nian, the great beast. One Chinese New Year’s Eve, a monk named HongJun LaoZu came to a village in China. He saw how everyone looked sad and frightened, so he went to a young man and said “Why are you so sad? It is Chinese New Year, a time for celebration.” The man replied “Do you not know? Have you not heard about Nian? He comes every New Year and terrorises us, even eats us.” The monk said “I will go and reason with Nian.” So off he went, to find Nian.

When HongJun LaoZu came to Nian, he said “Nian, I have come to reason with you. Stop eating and terrorising the people of China.” But Nian Said “HoHo. You have delivered yourself to me old man, now I will eat you.” “Oh, but what will that prove? Eating me isn’t great! Would you dare to eat the poisonous snakes on the mountains?” “Bah! What’s so difficult about that?” So Nian went to the poisonous snakes and ate them up. “How is this? Am I not great?” “At the back of the mountain there are many great beasts. Can you subdue them?” So Nian went and scared all of the dangerous beasts out of the back of the mountain.

“Old man, now its time for me to eat you!” “OK just wait while I take my clothes off, I will taste much better then”. So the old man took his clothes off to reveal his undergarments, which were red. “OK you can eat me now.” But Nian said “Ah! a red undergarment! I dearly hate red, get out of my sight quickly.” “HaHa! I knew you were afraid of red!” so the old man went into the town on top of Nian and said “Dear villagers, do not be afraid. Nian is most terrified of red. From now on each house must paste red on each of their doors to prevent Nian creating havoc.”

After that, the people started to paste red paper on their front doors before New Year’s Day.

Happy Rabbit Year!!  And another eureka flash:  when Patty Nolan finally gets her new bikini, it MUST be red.

The foto above here by Faith.  Two top fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Congratulations to Aleksander Doba, a 64-year-old who paddled across the Atlantic!

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