You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘NYS Marine Highway’ category.

Margot nears Troy with the Lockwood Bros barge from back in October. Watch the variety of backgrounds in this post, too.

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Jay Michael a few days ago passes by Con Hook.

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Amy C McAllister rounds the southern tip of Manhattan towing a capacious cargo barge Columbia Baltimore, capable of carrying 690 tees..

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Betty D light crosses the Upper Bay.   I didn’t say “Betty Delight,”  but the possibility for misunderstanding is there.

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Brendan Turecamo escorts Tammo inbound from the island of Jamaica.

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Fort McHenry waits over by IMTT.

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Sarah D pushes in some upstate rock.

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Fells Point crosses the Upper Bay bound for the Kills.

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And to finish with a photo from September, it’s Rae, standing by for the move of Wavertree.

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All photos by will Van Dorp.

 

 

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See the two big shoes on the Nadro Marine barge pushed by Margot?  You might also call them “pedestals” for the New York Wheel.  Those are size 110-ton shoes.  A little over a month ago, NY Media Boat caught the legs arriving, the legs which will wear these shoes.

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Here’s a close up with two crew getting prepared to offload these shoes.

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Chesapeake 1000–which you’ve seen working here and here–did the lift.  In the photo below taken just prior to the shoes’ arrival, Chesapeake 1000 is offloading the “multi-axle” furnished likely by Supor.  Sarah Ann assists with the swiveling of the large crane.

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Here’s a closeup of the multi-axle (there’s likely another name for that, but I don’t know it)

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and the drone that someone is using to document the transfer of cargoes.

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Here Margot finesses the Nadro/McKeil SV/M 86 with the shoes to the lift point.

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Here’s another view of the same, looking east.

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At this point, the barge is 110 tons lighter as the shoe is lifted and moved carefully onto the dock.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More shoes to come, although my Canadian cousins call them “boots.”

Click here for some details from SIlive.com.  And since it’s always good to see more Margot, click here.

Katanni and

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Sawyer I, these photos I took in September along the Saint Lawrence.

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I took the next photos in October.  Evans McKeil was built in Panama in 1936!   The cement barge she’s paired with–Metis— was built as a ship in 1956 and converted to a barge in 1991.

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Wilf Seymour was built in 1961 in Port Arthur TX.  I’ve always only seen her paired with Alouette Spirit.  Here she’s heading upbound into the Beauharnois Lock.   The digital readout (-0.5) indicates she’s using the Cavotec automated mooring system instead of lines and line handlers.

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Moving forward to Troy NY, I don’t think the name of this tug is D. A. Collins,   

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but I know these are Benjamin Elliot, Lucy H, and 8th Sea.

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Miss Gill waited alongside some scows at the booming port of Coeymans.

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And the big sibling Vane 5000 hp Chesapeake heads upriver with Doubleskin 509A.

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And one more autumnal shot with yellows, browns, grays, and various shades of red, and a busy Doris Moran and Adelaide.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos.

 

As we progress toward winter as well, the daylight hours shorten, making less to photograph, but I was happy we passed lock E8 in daylight to capture the crane GE uses to transship large cargos, like the rotor of a few weeks ago.

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The changing leaves complement the colors of the vintage floating plant,

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locks,

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and even Thruway vessels.

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Venerable Frances is a tug for all seasons as is

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the Eriemax freighter built in Duluth,

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both based near the city of the original Uncle Sam, which splashes its wall

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with additional color and info.

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Once this Eriemax passenger vessel raises its pilot house, we’ll continue our way to the sixth boro.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos in about a 12 hour period.

Here was Whatzit 32.  And what is it?

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Well, it’s big…

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and it’s unusual in that it came from overseas all the way to Lock E8, where a crane has been set up to transfer oversize cargo …  I look forward to getting a photo there in a few weeks.

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Here’s what this piece is.  This particular one was built in Japan by JCFC.  This link makes for interesting reading about the absence of heavy forging capacity in the US.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I thought I’d call this mystery tow, but it hints more at the whatzit category.  The answer will not be found in this post, but enjoy the clues.

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Those are real kilograms.

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Scale?  Location?  See the last photo to confirm location . . .

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. . . and again scale.

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More info will be forthcoming.  Will Van Dorp took all the photos here in the last week of September 2016.

 

To clarify this title, the first post in the series has a lead photo showing a map of our journey broken into legs marked by pins.  Legs 4 through 6 took us from Waterford, shown below, to Oswego.

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Urger stood by all spiffed up for the steamboat festival.

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Erie Canal Cruises accommodated sightseers eastbound toward lock E18.

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Tender 4, the electric motor vessel, assisted in a dredge project.

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Tug Erie tied up at the end of the work day.

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Here’s the cutterhead of one dredge.

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Lucy H returned light past Rome, NY.

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Never have I seen so

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many bald eagles.  This one is banded.

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And leg 6 ended in Oswego.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will post again when able.

 

By 1330 Tuesday, we docked at West Point, the first non-red pushpin in yesterday’s map.   Working backward, we saw Tappan Zee II at the TZ, as we did

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the Left Coast Lifter.

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Off the Palisades, we saw Sarah D;

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in Wallabout Bay, C. Angelo;

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at the southern end of Narragansett Bay, Dace Reinauer; and

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and Suomigracht with Cape Wind turbine blades,

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and soon after departing Warren, we saw Buckley McAllister.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is posting these without any alterations.  We saw much more as well.  Cheers.

Given the history and range of projects of Elsbeth II, you might imagine how thrilled I was to see her for the first time yesterday.  And she has to be among a small set of working vessels based in North America with brightwork!  She truly fits under the category exotic.

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I saw this tugboat six years ago in the Delaware River, but Sarah D looks spanking new  in NYS Marine Highway colors.

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Happy flag day.  Do you know the significance of this date?

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OSG Courageous, she’s one large tugboat and an infrequent

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visitor in this port.  I can’t quite make out the barge name. Of course, she’s not as colossal as her big sister –OSG Vision–who spent some time here . . . four (!!) years ago.

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Sassafras is a fixture in the sixth boro, but she rarely looks as good as she does when many shore dwellers in the other boros are just waking up.  Here she

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lies alongside Petali Lady.

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Mister Jim here is lightering (?) bulker Antigoni B, who seems to have since headed upriver.

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And since this is called random tugs, let me throw in two photos from the Digital collections of the New york State archives . . . SS Brazil entering the sixth boro on May 31, 1951.  What the photo makes very clear to me is how much traffic in the harbor has changed in 65 years.   Can anyone identify the six tugboats from at least three different companies here?  I can’t.

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Here the party passes a quite different looking Governors Island.

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All photos except for the last two by Will Van Dorp.  These last two come from a treasure trove aka Digital Collections of the New York State Archives. 

Unrelated:  If you’re free Saturday, it’s the annual mermaid migration on Coney Island.

 

and so much more!  Never have I seen so many barges in such close proximity one to another.  What if you woke up and saw this from your bunk?

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I’d thought to call this a whatzit post, but

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the prime mover is a tug I’d long hoped to see . . . Elsbeth II, of the Smith Maritime fleet, and that link is to Burkhard Bilger’s article from the New Yorker a few years back.

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6000 hp and three screws.

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Built in Palatka, Florida, Sarah D was another of my subjects this morning, since she’s a new acquisition for NYS Marine Highway.  .

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I never got her and the tow–aka Atlanta Bridge–in the same frame until here. Cargo barge Atlanta Bridge has transported some interesting cargoes.

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Here Sarah D has pulled ahead of Elsbeth II.

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You can see how windy it has been for the past 24+ hours in the sixth boro.

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I hope there’s someone upriver getting photos of the ballasting and floating off, aka the second half of the FLO-FLO ops.

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The first photo comes from Seaman Sou-Sobriquet, whom I thank;  all the others were taken by Will Van Dorp.

 

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