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By 1330 Tuesday, we docked at West Point, the first non-red pushpin in yesterday’s map.   Working backward, we saw Tappan Zee II at the TZ, as we did

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the Left Coast Lifter.

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Off the Palisades, we saw Sarah D;

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in Wallabout Bay, C. Angelo;

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at the southern end of Narragansett Bay, Dace Reinauer; and

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and Suomigracht with Cape Wind turbine blades,

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and soon after departing Warren, we saw Buckley McAllister.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is posting these without any alterations.  We saw much more as well.  Cheers.

Given the history and range of projects of Elsbeth II, you might imagine how thrilled I was to see her for the first time yesterday.  And she has to be among a small set of working vessels based in North America with brightwork!  She truly fits under the category exotic.

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I saw this tugboat six years ago in the Delaware River, but Sarah D looks spanking new  in NYS Marine Highway colors.

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Happy flag day.  Do you know the significance of this date?

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OSG Courageous, she’s one large tugboat and an infrequent

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visitor in this port.  I can’t quite make out the barge name. Of course, she’s not as colossal as her big sister –OSG Vision–who spent some time here . . . four (!!) years ago.

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Sassafras is a fixture in the sixth boro, but she rarely looks as good as she does when many shore dwellers in the other boros are just waking up.  Here she

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lies alongside Petali Lady.

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Mister Jim here is lightering (?) bulker Antigoni B, who seems to have since headed upriver.

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And since this is called random tugs, let me throw in two photos from the Digital collections of the New york State archives . . . SS Brazil entering the sixth boro on May 31, 1951.  What the photo makes very clear to me is how much traffic in the harbor has changed in 65 years.   Can anyone identify the six tugboats from at least three different companies here?  I can’t.

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Here the party passes a quite different looking Governors Island.

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All photos except for the last two by Will Van Dorp.  These last two come from a treasure trove aka Digital Collections of the New York State Archives. 

Unrelated:  If you’re free Saturday, it’s the annual mermaid migration on Coney Island.

 

and so much more!  Never have I seen so many barges in such close proximity one to another.  What if you woke up and saw this from your bunk?

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I’d thought to call this a whatzit post, but

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the prime mover is a tug I’d long hoped to see . . . Elsbeth II, of the Smith Maritime fleet, and that link is to Burkhard Bilger’s article from the New Yorker a few years back.

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6000 hp and three screws.

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Built in Palatka, Florida, Sarah D was another of my subjects this morning, since she’s a new acquisition for NYS Marine Highway.  .

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I never got her and the tow–aka Atlanta Bridge–in the same frame until here. Cargo barge Atlanta Bridge has transported some interesting cargoes.

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Here Sarah D has pulled ahead of Elsbeth II.

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You can see how windy it has been for the past 24+ hours in the sixth boro.

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I hope there’s someone upriver getting photos of the ballasting and floating off, aka the second half of the FLO-FLO ops.

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The first photo comes from Seaman Sou-Sobriquet, whom I thank;  all the others were taken by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here was 55.

Glenn Raymo took this photo in Germantown yesterday, the all-new Sarah D; previously I used these photos by Glenn.  Check out an example of one of many of his zazzle products here.

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Sarah D until very recently was Helen D. Coppedge.  Almost all these photos were taken by other people, but I add the next two I took in 2010 for comparison purposes.

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Also, new–as in out-of-the-shipyard new . . . it’s Barry Silverton, with the Fight ALS barge.  Click here for the story of the names. Many thanks to Allen Baker–click here for previous photos he’s shared– for this photo and to

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Ted Bishop for the photo below.

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This photo comes thanks to Renee Lutz Stanley.  It’s Lyman–I think–looking insignificant in one of the huge graving docks at the Brooklyn Navy yard.  Click here for previous photos by Renee.  Anyone know which dock this is?

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With news of a wooden boat found under a house during a construction project in Highlands NJ still –well news– what you see below are photos of another wooden vessel found during a construction project in Boston.  Many thanks to Tom Mann for these photos.  Here are previous photos from Tom.

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As soon as imaging is complete, it will be removed.

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Archeologists at the site believe it was a 19th century vessel delivering lime.

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Many thanks to Tom, Renee, Ted, Allen, and Glenn for photos used here.

Related:  Here’s a story about a shipwreck discovered during construction of WTC1.

 

Here are the previous 17 iterations of this title.  I thought of this the other day when there were three others photographing with me along a short stretch of the KVK.

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Recreation along the waterway there has been popular for a very long time.  I took this photo recently at Noble Maritime at –you guessed it–Sailors Snug Harbor.  I’m always surprised at how many people say that fine institution is on their list but they’ve not yet gone.  More on this soon.  Go.

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Here’s another photo from Noble Maritime.  Can you identify anyone on this 1878 photo?

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Did you guess it?  Taking the air along or on the waterways puts you in fine company.

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Some folks works there, possibly because they enjoy that environment.

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See the folks on this MSC vessel?  Look near the middle of the M on MSC.

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There.  They’re probably waiting to assist the pilot off the ship.

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Standing by with lines is critical.

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As is having a refreshing cup of coffee . . .  Enjoy the rest of these photos.

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All photos here, including the one below, were taken by Will Van Dorp.

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Recently I had the good fortune of crossing paths with David Rider of Seamen’s Church Institute, and what was he doing . . . photography.  See his March 2016 shots here.

And for some reflection on taking better photos, check out this Youtube pilot video.  I hope more in the series get made, if they haven’t already.

I don’t actually go looking for parallel posts;  maybe it’s just that my brain thinks and eyes see in similar ways from one year to the next in March, but here and here are posts from exactly four years ago.

Although this blog focuses on work boats, I’ll comment on backgrounds today.  What’s on the water is fluid, but all the constant transformations on the landsides here are more permanent and yet constantly evolving.  Baseline might have been 500 years ago, but even by then it had evolved.  The cruise ship here is docked at what today is called Cape Liberty Cruise Port;  thirty years ago it was MOTBY.

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Frances waits at a barge anchorage near Anthem of the Seas

Over on the nearest shore, left half of the photo is evidence of work where next year an attraction called New York Wheel will spin.  I know we’re way past name discussions now, but I’m still for alternatives like Ferries Wheel or NY Wheeler Dealer . . . .  And with the reference to “pods,” I’m thinking of a series of sci-fi movies . . .

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Eastern Welder fishes as New Jersey Responder exits the KVK.

The uneven, brown land just off the starboard bow of USNS Red Cloud is part of the Bayonne Golf Club, below the surface of which is a capped landfill.

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Discovery Coast passes in front of Red Cloud.

Off to the left, you see current status of the Bayonne side of the bridge named for the same town.

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From l. to r., there’s Chandra B, Celsius Manila, New Jersey Responder, and (I think) Robert E. McAllister.

Looking from behind the construction site for the Wheel, some miles to NE are part of the Statue of Liberty and  the iconic 1931 Empire State Building.

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Anacostia (2009)  and Tangier Island (2014)  look a lot alike, but the older boat has 1200 more horsepower.

Note the double deck traffic on the VZ Bridge.

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l. to r. it’s Caroline Oldendorff and Australian Spirit.

This is looking from the middle of Upper Bay across Red Hook to downtown Brooklyn.

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In front of the busy background, it’s Alice Oldendorff, Rossini, and Robert E. McAllister.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Today’s photos were taken less than a month ago by Ingrid Staats, who writes, “I grew up on the Hudson River and I love getting your blog posts! Here’s some pics from my last trip upstate 1/30– looking north toward Albany, there’s two tugs waiting to greet Champion Istra.  One is Frances Turecamo.  She went past [the tanker], then turned around and escorted her on the stern while the other one led her bow

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About three hours later I saw BBC Tennessee come up. So much action on the river these days ….”

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As you know, I enjoy collaborations on this blog, and then I do my own poking around.  If the shipspotting info is correct, BBC Tennessee called so briefly in Albany–between a stop in Newport News and Philadelphia–that it doesn’t even show.  As of this morning, March 2, she’s inbound Rio de la Plata for Buenos Aires.

Champion Istra is currently in midAtlantic, westbound from Denmark, headed for Philadelphia.

Many thanks to Ingrid for these photos, which offer insights into Hudson River shipping connections.

The photo below comes via Russell Skeris, who seems to have gotten it from Fred Miller II . . . to keep credits where they belong.  Click here for two previous posts Russell contributed to.  I’m curious where this photo was taken, given the US/Canadian flags on the mast.  And when?  It would have to be 1998 or prior, given the stack.  Anyhow, Russell writes, “It was a nice little surprise to log onto tugster this am and see the pics of the Frances. It put a smile on my wife’s face ( little Fran [the namesake. She misses her mom who passed in 2014. I thought you might like this pic probably from the 70’s that appears to have been taken on Kodachrome film.It was also before the sun visor had gotten all banged up like in many of the pictures that I’ve found . I’m going to send some older black and whites of Frances being launched in 1957 at Jakobsons in Oyster Bay.”

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Also, he writes, “The weathervane we had made some years ago for the couple on Fran’s house. She really was surprised when we gave it to her and connected her to her past.

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The life ring is a real relic and has hung in the wall in the kitchen for as long as I can remember.”

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Thanks, Russell.   Sorry it took so long to post this.  I guess it’s good that I go away now and then so that old unused posts finally see the light of day.

aka GHP&W 2.  Macedon only became a port when Clinton built his ditch.  The ditch and subsequent iterations connected it to the sea.  When I took the photo below back on Oct 21 2014, eastbound on Urger, I felt very far from salt water.

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But Chris Williams’ photo below, taken October 25, 2015, shows how connected Macedon is to the sixth boro and all watery places on Earth beyond the VZ Bridge.   Less than a week ago, I did a post about Margot, the tug frequently-seen in NYC that delivered this cargo to the port of Macedon.

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Bob Stopper took the next set photos.  The fact that a Goldhofer semitrailer of 12 axles, 48 wheels,  is needed shows the weight of the cargo delivered across the state by NYS Marine Highway.  The land portion of the cargo transfer is provided by Edwards Moving and Rigging.

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Here’s a closeup of the hydraulics at the front of the trailer.

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Transfer from barge to trailer begins with the jacking up of the cargo.

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At this point, there are 96 wheels under and moving the cargo.

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The next photo taken by Rob Goldman, and taken from the NYS Canal Corporation FB page,  on October 31, 2015, shows how the Edwards trailer moves the cargo, one huge piece at a time, off the barge and into the port of Macedon.

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Macedon is one of those place names in central NY named for places or people in classical Greek and Roman history.    Others are Troy, Ithaca, Palmyra, Greece, Athens, Rome  .  .  .  and more;  people memorialized in town names here include Hannibal, Scipio, Pompey, Homer, Ulysses, Brutus  . . . .

Credit for these photos goes to Chris, Bob, and Rob.  My personal connection to Macedon includes the fact that I bought my first car there, less than a half mile from the Canal, and at the time had no clue that it was a port, that it could be connected to the oceans.

Here are previous “port of __” posts i’ve done.

And finally, unrelated, here from another even smaller NY canal port, here’s into on an auction below.

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Although I’ve never named a post after this tugboat, you have seen her prominently in posts like here, here, and here.

Margot and crew specialize in commercial cargoes to places no longer accustomed to seeing such arrive by Canal.   The cargo here is electrical generators for PSEG a pair of very heavy transformers …. for RG&E Macedon.

Here’s the lowest air draft on the Canal, about 15 feet under Bridge E-93.  I’m guessing that an egg positioned at the high point on Margot would have been crushed here.  You’ve seen this bridge before on this blog here . . . last photo.

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Notice how low the barge is.  It’s flooded with water to reduce the air draft of the top of the cargo.

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All these photos were taken between Montezuma and Macedon.

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Here the tow is exiting Lock 27.

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All the above photos were taken by Bob Stopper, frequent upstate contributor to this blog.  The next two come thanks to Chris and Eileen Williams, whose work also has been featured here.  Here the tow waits to be offloaded just west of Lock 30.

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A final photo–mine–I took in March 2015;  I include it here to show what travels between the water’s surface and the canal bed.

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Bravo to NYS Marine Highway, and thanks to Bob, Chris, and Eileen for these photos.

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