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Since the first in this series was in 2009, let me go through my archives starting from the present.   I seem to have taken no photos of James so far in 2015, but here are two from 2014.

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Here are a few from 2013, the day the new Caddell Dry Dock came to town.

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I don’t know where 2012 went, but here was 2011, passing Stena Stealth.

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I especially like this one with James‘ house down to fit under the flare of Silver Express.

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For a few weeks when the NYC DEP Red Hook came to town, James followed . . . like a fly on  . . .

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well, a DEP boat.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp. For some shots of the vessel in Turecamo woodgrain, click here.

 

I hope it ends soon.  Of course, ice is just a part of the sixth boro cycle.  See the ice photos here from 2009.  Enjoy these shots from the last day of February 2015.  But for the hot days sure to come later this year, how about this tall tale of Meagan Ann traveling through the icebergs of New York.  In her early years, Meagan Ann operated in Alaskan waters.

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APL Coral  . . .  Oakland, CA-registered, must be named for cold water species.

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The Bravest heads out on cold water patrol. See more about Bravest in this article by Peter Marsh.

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M/V Miss Ellis, built by Blount in 1991, has likely used ice before today to scrape growth from its hull.

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North River . . . has sludge to move around the harbor.

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Zim QingDao appeared previously–with a surprise on the bridge wing–here.

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And these ferries keep running despite the ice.

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Molinari sets up the ultimate sixth boro tall tale image, beautifully created by Scott Lobaido.

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I saw the image below on the ferry, and if you want it, you can order it here.  I’ve never met Scott, but I love this lithograph.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here were 1 and 2 of this series, and here was a much earlier post about NYC DEP’s essential service.

Below is North River and Hunts Point as seen from Rockaway.

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Port Richmond heads into Hell’s Gate,

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Red Hook in the distance and Port Richmond passing by,

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and finally all three new boats with Red Hook in the distance.  Here are some photos of Red Hook as she appeared when first in service in early 2009.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For photos of all the previous generations of sludge carriers–aka carriers of Gross Universal Product–click here for the first in this series.  Rockaway makes the second of NYCDEP’s latest vessels I’ve seen.  Look her over well.

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She’s only slightly less loaded than  . . .

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Hunt’s Point, which I saw about a half hour later.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

. . . my latest coined term . . . for which the acronym GUP lends itself is  . . . gross universal product, i.e. what’s transported in vessels like these.  And it really is “universal,” as evidenced by a Hong Kong vessel like this.   That it is gross . . . let me say that it goes without saying.

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Newtown Creek and Red Hook belong to two generations of NYCDEP vessels traveling along the East River . . . past places like this in these photos from 2012.  Red Hook came to transport GUP in 2009, the latest sludge carrier until

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this one —Hunts Point–came along this February . . . in a photo compliments of bowsprite

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Newtown Creek was launched in 1968 . . . and still carries a lot of GUP.

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North River . . . 1974. Imagine your garbage being picked up by a 1974 Oshkosh!

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Owls Head, the previous class and shown here in 2009 mothballed, launched in 1952!  And I had to find some 1952 waste picker uppers.

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In case you’re wondering what prompts this post and what is new in this post, given previous ones like this and this  . . .  well here it is, something I hunted for a long time and finally found yesterday when the air-conditioned New York Public Library felt fantastic!   Mayor La Guardia spent a grand total of $1,497,000–much of it WPA money–for three sludge carriers launched in January, February, and March 1938, Wards Island, Tallman Island, and Coney Island, resp.  Wards Island and Tallman Island became barges Susan Frank and Rebecca K and Coney Island was reefed in 1987, although I can’t find where.

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Below are the specs.  Note that “sludge” is NOT raw GUP.  I’d love to hear stories bout and see pics of these Island class DEP boats.  How large were the crews and what was the work schedule?

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Click on the photo below for info on what was at least part of waste disposal–built in Elizabethport 1897— prior to La Guardia’s sludge tankers.

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Here from the NYC Municipal Archives is a dumping boat said to be hauled out at “East River Dry docks,”  which I’m not sure the location of.

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Unrelated, here’s another vessel–Pvt. Joseph F. Merrell-– built at the same location along the KVK in early 1951 and disposed of not far away after transitioning from Staten Island Merrell-class ferry to NYC prison space.  Does anyone know the disposition of Don Sutherland’s photos of Merrell/Wildstein?

More government vessels. Jamaica Bay is an aquatic weed harvester. I’ve seen these on freshwater lakes and rivers, but this was my first sighting transiting the East River. Anyone know where it operates? Jamaica Bay maybe?
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S/V Moritz uses Reson Seabat systems to map the harbor bottom.
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Hayward is a debris remover and dump truck.

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Profile view of Hayward with its 84-foot crane that can lift a whale, a helicopter, a floataway container… you name it. But who was “Hayward” so honored?

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Buoy tender Katherine Walker maintains channel markers. Her namesake is shown at this link.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Troy Lock stops any vessel longer than 300 feet and wider than 43 feet. It is 134 nautical miles back to the Battery, mostly south to the heart of New York harbor. Notice the signal light positioned in front of the lock house is giving a red light.  From Troy, let’s head southward.
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Eight miles to the south it’s the Port of Albany, a tidal port that accommodates ships up to 750 feet long, 110 wide, and drawing 32.

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The bulk carrier below, some 40 miles south of Albany is outbound, approaching the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge. It’s still another 80 miles to Manhattan.
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Poughkeepsie, West Point, Yonkers, and everything in between we’ll have time to see later. Now we push outbound.

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Jersey City to starboard and the Battery to port, a DEP sludge tanker overtaking us to starboard, we move toward the Narrows, another two plus miles on.

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We head to port, pass the stern of the incoming container ship and follow the Ambrose Channel out.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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