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This title means odds and ends . . . so this is a post that represents my clearing my decks, or rather desk or electronic folders.

Compare the two screen grabs below, first recreational boats filling the Sound but heading for safe haven in advance of Henri last weekend.

Monday morning . . . the same view.  Of course, pre-AIS, small craft would do the same thing, just there’d be no trace of it.

Occasionally while looking at AIS, you might see a sub.

Might there be a portal in that location between Montauk and Block Island?  If you see subs one day and Viking Starship another day, there may be cause for wonder . . ., and yes, I’m joking.

Any idea what these tracks are?

Above and below are tracks left by the same vessel, Ferdinand R. Hassler, a NOAA vessel used for hydrographic charting, among other tasks.  Thanks to  Hassler for reliable charts. I’ve yet to catch a photo of her.

Below is a photo from the 2014 Hudson River tugboat race, an event that will again not happen this year.  The big gray tug is Anthony Wayne.  A sister tug sold last week at auction for, as I recall just under $1.5 million.  Anyone know who the winning bidder was?

And finally, excuse the backlit photos, down along the BAT side of the Upper Bay, this assemblage has been anchored.  The tugboat is Ocean Tower, and she’s alongside

what looks to be a scow, a crane barge, and a crew boat.  The barge with the landing platform

is Dutra’s Paula Lee.  Anyone know where they’ll be working?

And while we’re doing all kinds of stories here, do you know “Bring Your Dreams,” aka BYD Motors?  Well, they have a connection with a NYC port here and here.  BYD . . .  you know that’s just begging for parody, like the one about F. O. R. D.  . . .

All photos, and odds and ends, chosen, WVD.

 

Here’s where I first saw her in mid September.  At first I thought it was NOAAS Thomas Jefferson (S 222), though I was guessing only by the color and had seen Jefferson here once before, back after Sandy. 

Before that, bowsprite had seen Jefferson.  But NOAA has over a dozen vessels, and the only other two I’d seen were RV Henry B. Bigelow and RV Ferdinand R. Hassler.  Here is info on the fate of the first Hassler.

But in mid October I last saw Foster, likely on her departure from the sixth boro, because the other day I noticed on her FB page that she’s been collecting samples of  invasive dinoflagellates in the Gulf of Maine and now she’s back in her homeport of

Charleston.    So who was Nancy Foster, the namesake?

Click here.  And if you’re wondering why Jefferson has a NOAA vessel named for him, it’s because he authorized the first US coastal survey in 1807.  That survey, by the way, was headed up by Mr. Hassler.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

So who heads up NOAA today?  Click here.

I started a series called transitioning, but here’s something new.  Actually I did a transit post a few years back when a Boston ex-fireboat transited the sixth boro on its way to  Lake Huron to reinvent as a dive boat.

This post started with Glenn Raymo catching a shot of NOAA 5503 northbound in Poughkeepsie.

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Then, unprompted, Mike Pelletier, engineer of Urger noticed it between locks 2 and 3 in Waterford, westbound.  When I noticed it on AIS, southbound on the Welland, I knew she was doing a long haul.  So here’s what I’ve since learned:  this vessel “was transferred to NOAA from the CG in Fort Macon NC.  Its final destination is Muskegon MI,  where it will undergo a full overhaul and be refit for service as a research vessel on the Great Lakes.”   Many thanks to Glenn, Mike, and my other sources.

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But if NOAA is transiting far, Sand Master is going much much farther.  Any ideas what HN RTB is?

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Here’s a photo of Sand Master I got just over a month ago at the Great Lake just west of the Bayonne Bridge.

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Try Roatán, Honduras.

Thanks all for the photos and the information.  And please help keep eyes open for unique transiting vessels and those who work mostly here.

It appears that Staten Island ferry John J. Marchi was crossing the Upper Bay just before 1800 hrs.  Otherwise, it was still mostly government boats like

NOAA S-222 Thomas Jefferson, performing post-storm hydrographic surveys.  I took this foto back in early September 2012.  Buoys move, debris lurks, and bottom depths change.  Assessing and correcting these and other conditions of the port are keeping lots of folks really busy . . . .

I braved gridlock and frantic traffic with very long lines at gas stations to get to my work.  A detour–of course–led me past Arthur Kill Park across from the Howland Hook Container Terminal.  As no doubt you’ve seen in fotos of docks, boardwalks, and coastal areas from Cape May to here, these fishing docks are wrecked.  Remarkable here is that this dock is protected by 10 miles of waterway and  Staten Island’s heights from the ocean.

Two vessels that rode out the storm in port are (l to r) dredge Atchafalaya and container ship CSAV Itajai, not sure why this latter stayed in port.    Here’s my previous not-so-great foto of Atchafalaya.

As I said, lots of assessments are happening . . .  which means very little traffic.

I believe this is survey boat Cape Elizabeth.  In the distance at Fort Wadsworth–wonder how my goats are–notice the tents set up for Sunday’s NY Marathon.

And this may very well be the first tug/barge to leave the sixth boro post-Sandy . . . Morgan Reinauer, I think.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, and except for the shot of Thomas Jefferson . . . all taken today.

If you’re free and local, here’s a lecture on hurricane/flood risk coming up in two weeks on my friend Philip’s blog.  And here’s insights on risk assessment/response driving the Dutch “deltaworks” project after their “once in 10,000 years” flood considerations post-1953 North Sea flood, which claimed over 2000 lives.  

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