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Here’s Random Tugs 66.   The foto of Quenames in the Gowanus comes thanks to Vladimir Brezina, the bow of whose vessel intrudes ever so slightly into the bottom of the foto.

Eddie R of Interport Towing and Transportation steams through the harbor with 1 WTC in the background.    More 1 WTC views soon.  Eddie R‘s fleet sibling Lucinda Smith is here.

Maryland . . . northbound toward 1 WTC.

Red Hook Grain Terminal in the background, Christine M. McAllister pushes Reinauer RTC 502.

Elk River exits the east end of the KVK, with white cranes in the background at Global Terminal.

Torm Anne gets ushered in by Gramma Lee T Moran.

Ross Sea pushes a deep-loaded barge.  In the distance, a small portion of the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Farther upriver Patty Nolan finds herself alone at the dock surrounded by a thin layer of ice that

in the brackish water over in Newark Bay would not form.  That’s Port Elizabeth to the northeast.

Last shot:  a nameless pusher tug on the high and dry at an undisclosed location north of the Tappan Zee aka (but rarely) Malcolm Wilson Bridge.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except of course the one by Vladimir.

The Bayonne Bridge has stood astride this blog from Post #1, and yet, I’ve never slung my lenses over its walkway.  Truth be told, I rarely view  the sixth boro FROM the Bridge;  instead the Bridge frames my view . .  . . fills background.  Richard Wonder–who previously submitted this wonderful shot of John B. Caddell almost four years ago–has convinced me with this next stunning series of shots that views from that bridge must lie in my future.

Yang Ming Efficiency slides inbound.  Might that be Ellen port (along) side?

I’m wondering what the large “granular” load is in the open-top containers. . . . castings?

Heading toward Shooter’s Island, Efficiency begins a rotation to starboard.  That’s either Charles D. or McAllister Responder between Efficiency and Shooter’s.

To execute the turn, Margaret Moran plays stern thruster with all

its might.

All fotos by Richard Wonder.  Thank!!

Related:  The NYTimes this morning ran an article on those links between this bridge, Savannah, Panama, and August 15, 2014.

This post is devoted entirely to requests for info.  Like . . . what is the metal cage on this disintegrating wooden barge on the portion of Shooter’s Island shore right opposite Mariner’s Harbor?

Calaboose?  hoosegow?  tool crib?  bird cage?  rat pen?

Industrial to be sure, but what is

this structure right across the southeasternmost point of Port Elizabeth and near a green corner of Bayonne?

Lygra has an unusual design for these parts.  I caught her in Red Hook about two months back.  Anyone seen her before?  Know what she transported?

Someone asked me about this boat last winter, no doubt attracted by the design and the port of registry:  Portsmouth NH.  Until I watched it a bit this summer and noticed divers aboard, I was convinced that Dolphin III was a sport fishing vessel:  billfish or tuna.

But it seemed to be operating as a dive support boat, complete with

a fairly large tender.

So it didn’t surprise me to hear that the vessel might be working with a marine contractor.  Anyone know what project might be?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Recently I’ve read parts of Marc Levinson’s The Box:  How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Richer.  The book tells as much about shipping and more specifically the port of New York as it does about McLean’s box.   McClean aka “father of containerization,” started toward the box in 1934 when he bought a used pickup truck to ship tobacco products.  Read about his trajectory as shipping visionary in the link above.

In 1934 only the gray stone (I believe it’s 20 Exchange Place)  building (behind and just to the left of the white cupola) making up this skyline as seen from off Battery Park City existed.  On the waterfront were piers and more piers.  Danish vessel Adriatic ID, rather than sailing past Manhattan, would likely have docked there.    From Levinson, “the city’s piers–283 of them at mid century with 98 of them able to handle ocean-going vessels–were strung out along the Manhattan and Brooklyn waterfronts.”  Bowsprite has a foto (third image down) of all these piers in this post.

ROROs like Fedora didn’t exist before World War 2, but if they had, Bayonne would not have been where they docked.

Similarly, the piers and docks of Red Hook Brooklyn were strewn with easily-pilfered break bulk cargo:  cases, casks, cartons, bags, boxes of all sizes, bundles, packages, pieces, drums, cans, barrels, vehicles, crates, transporters, reels, coils, piles, and the kitchen sink.  The containers offloaded from Maas Trader may in fact “package” all those things and more, only the number of dock workers and the time they work would be exponentially different from pre-World War 2.

South African vessel Safmarine Oranje would not have turned westward here toward Port Elizabeth or Howland Hook;  it wasn’t until 1955 that the Robert Meyner, then governor of New Jersey,  and the Port Authority (established in 1921) signed a deal to transformed a marsh into the container port Port Elizabeth is today.

More history later . . . but today, the arrival and departure of “long trainloads” contained within 1000′ loa vessels is commonplace, OOCL  Oakland arriving and

APL Japan, departing.

Hong Kong bulk carrier Great Majesty anchors in

the Upper Bay along Sunset Park just off the Brooklyn Army Terminal and in the watchful eye of Our Lady of Perpetual Help.

Before leaving town, few mariners ever set foot on dry land.    IGA heads for sea under the bridge that wasn’t there until 1964.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Good golly . . . what hangs there?  Find a color clue  in the lower left corner as to ownership of the crane, …

Why . . . it’s Miss Holly aka these days as Paul Andrew. If you click the Paul Andrew link, check Sarah Ann. And if you own a crane like this, who needs a dry dock to lift a vessel into the high and dry?

Paul Andrew (ex-Miss Holly) built in 1968, 63′ x 23′ x 8 draft and 2400 hp.  Anyone

have fotos of

Miss Holly hanging around?

Sorry, but I couldn’t resist.  Nor could I resist listening to Little Richard Miss Holly . . . er something.

Top three fotos (taken in March 2008) taken by Mr Bill Benson of Hydrographic Surveys.  Thanks much, Bill.  The last two, by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  A peak moment in 2009 for me was seeing Onrust lowered from a crane into the Mohawk for its very first float event.

The amazing diversity of traffic on the boro all year round thrills me, like feather-light kayaks gliding past dredgers sucking alluvial ooze from the floor,

one human powered craft yielding to OOCL Verrazano Bridge 4738-teu vessel with almost 60,000 (59764.08…) horsepower,

more kayaks posing with Lucky D and different sullage scooping equipment before

heading north into the habitat of furious ferries, who might change their whole image by slowing down a notch and getting themselves renamed as Tinker Bell and Puck.

On another day, overlaid with haze, more traffic flows:  left to right are Petalouda, Lucky D, Patapsco,  dredge barge GL51, and Sarah Dann.  As to Petalouda, check out the name of the rest of the fleet in the link in the previous sentence.

And on a still hazier day,  Vera K waits as Cosco Boston rounds Bergen Point on its final mile into Port Newark.  That’s the Bayonne Bridge off in the east.

Fotos 2, 3, and 4 many thanks to Vladimir Brezina.  See his comments on “Mixed Use.”  Other fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but you will be thrilled to check out these videos of paddlecam and icecam . . . via peconic jeff, 2010 comes to documenting surfing and ice-skating!!

Superlatives:  Ti Oceania, largest working tanker at 441,000 dwt and 1246′ loa.  Oasis of the Seas, largest cruise ship at 1181′ loa and 234′ air draft;  ie., it cannot be shoehorned under the Verrazano Bridge.  Berge Stahl, largest bulk carrier at 365,000 dwt and 1125′ loa and draft of about 75′.  Here are other sites on this trio:  TO,  OS, and BS.

Immense!  Like these cranes, the likes of which you saw arrive in this March 2007 post.

Look closer and

eventually you see a dock worker, miniscule way up there.

And considering the scale of machinery and vast number of containers that need to be moved, it might interest you to see

what a crane operator sees, between his or her shoes.  Really . . . the operator booths have glass floors so that the spreader bar with flippers seems to shrink as it descends toward a container.

Sorry there was no ship in place when this foto was taken.  For an outside view of the operator booth, see the last foto here.

Here is scale difference of another sort, and because of

foreshortening, the distance between these two ships–Cielo di Napoli and Americas Spirit–seems recklessly small.

First three fotos thanks to Jed;  last four are mine.

Where I’m steering  here most corresponds to the second post in this series, Coexistence 2.  On an ideal day, all traffic gets along, sorts itself out.  Big steel and small steel keep clear of one another, again

and again, no matter what the direction or

cargo or time of hitch or

commercial alliance or lack thereof, or

speed for whatever the purpose . . . understandings get articulated, negotiated, and agreed upon.

But then without warning and from out of nowhere, the wild jumps

in.  The beast, driven by terror of the predator and the mindless urge to mate, dives in

as members of its species have for millenia.  Some have always made it, wild and unfettered.  But now the environment has

changed;  rules and conditions altered.   And intervention happens or

doesn’t.

Many thanks to Bill Bensen for the three fotos of the deer.  For the record, Bill took these fotos about three weeks ago although it may be the same buck that jumped in this week.  For more of Bill’s fotos of animals of the harbor, click here.

Other fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Info on the vessels in the fotos:  Foto 1: Bro Albert is a Maersk product tanker with an unidentified McAllister tug in the distance.  Foto 2:  Marie J. Turecamo and Kimberly Turecamo pirouette parcel tanker Stolt Vanguard out to sea.  Foto 3:  from near to far, Taft Beach, Captain D, and ATB Pati R. Moran moves the barge Charleston with assist from an unidentified Moran tug.  Foto 4:  near to far is Davis Sea and Java Sea.

Related:  I included the tug Dolphin above as an attempt to broaden the term, given  Bowsprite’s recent treat (treatise?) on inanimate harbor “animal” life.

The sixth boro has had a lot of weather this past month;  Bowsprite‘s drawing and writing about it.  I’m just trying to weather it.  And Andres has arrived.

Hmm.  “Weathering storms”  . . . now that phrase puzzles me.  Storms are weather.  Metaphorical storms that need weathering like illness or loss   . . . what does it mean to “weather” them?  Be a hurricane to a gale and outlast it?  Be an anticyclone to a cyclone?  Uglyships’ very own Zeebart sent these fotos along from the North Sea.  Here  gCaptain writes about waterspouts.

aaaaws

I’m not sure how to describe my attitude toward weather, but I show such profound respect that I might just lack the uumph to weather serious storms or wild seas.   Last summer I met a Croatian sailor who’d just sailed the Gulf of Mexico through Rita.  To paraphrase his words:  “Our container vessel was a plaything tossed by the storm:  what a rush!

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I loved it!  In fact, it’s why I work on the sea rather than an office,” he stated, smiling.

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From the cliffs of Lower Manhattan, Joel Milton caught this weather, an approaching Jersey storm, downpour over Newark obscuring the Watchung ridges.

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Here are some of my weather shots . . .  Mary Turecamo (?) exiting the Narrows for sea.

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Newark Bay in April.

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Unidentified unit at the Narrows in December.

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Summer dusk last year.

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Here’s a link to the “eternal storm” over Lake Maracaibo (Venezuela).  All otherwise unattributed fotos by Will Van Dorp.

And speaking of “wild seas and stormy weather,” the latest report from mid-Atlantic says Henry had his foremast carried away.  Read all about it here.

(continued from 2a)  … as I was saying, once Margaret senses an opening between Sex and the bulkhead, she nudges the bow over toward New Jersey, causing Laura K to quicken her 5100 horsepower and to send Kills water geysering astern.

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Margaret lavishes 3000-hp attention to the bow,

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Laura K persists,

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Margaret doesn’t relent until Sex‘s

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964′ length pivots with the desired angle to slip into the channel toward Newark Bay,

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Sex‘s 104’ beam gets squeezed between a total of 8100 hp intensely pushing, while she herself uses nearly 30,000 hp to withdraw

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transforming the tugs into flexible thrusters, bow and stern, backing

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in the direction of southern Bayonne before

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release from the confines of protected waters and a run to sea.  A ship as long as a 64-floor building is tall urged from bonds ashore to energized freedom to rock on whatever seas she encounters . . . all taking less than 15 minutes  . . . tis a thing of beauty.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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