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Here were previous snapshots of sample small craft on the sixth boro, a city of water all summer and all other seasons as well.  Here one of the four-season RIBs of NY Media Boat passes along the western margins of Brooklyn, where a lot of folks congregate in the evening.

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Manhattan is one of Classic Harbor Line‘s vessel.

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Crew launch Christian works all summer and all other seasons too.

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Tara heads under the Brooklyn Bridge as light fades.

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Fish appear to be active over where Kate used to chum with food scraps.

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And this skipper seemed to enjoy pushing his craft against the currents in Hell Gate.

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And there are so many other small craft in all parts of the sixth boro.   All these photos taken recently by Will Van Dorp.

We’ve seen James D., Kirby, and JRT.  And now . .  welcome Jonathan C Moran.  Another photo of the 6000 hp newest in the port later in the post.

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For now, also resplendent in the June dawn . . . Jane A. Bouchard,

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the unique B. Franklin Reinauer,

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and so let’s add another of this facet tug,

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Evening Light (the former Frederick E. ), 

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the lean, green James E. Brown, 

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the age-defying Durham,

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the indefatigable James Turecamo,

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and finally another shot of Jonathan C Moran.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who needs to get back to work.

Here was the first in this series, which at the time I didn’t know would become a series.

This photos of Delaware was taken in the KVK back in November last year.

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Here she was still at Caddell’s in midApril this year.

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And in earlymid May, she returned

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to the Cape May-Lewes run.  It appears that she’s one of triplets from here around 1974-75.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here to see one of the sister vessels breaking ice at Cape May.

Barges “1” was years ago.  And here are previous posts that in some way focus on some sort of barge.  But the two photos below, which I took in May, prompt this post.  I can’t identify this Bouchard barge, but look at the size of the yard worker in comparison.

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It’s quite likely this is not one of their largest barges, but it is indeed sizable.

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The B. No. 260 is 350′ loa and slightly different design although a similar deep notch.

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The B. No. 220 is 404′ –here along with Normandy and Bouchard Boys–and

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B. No. 280 is 399′.  I’m not sure which tug is driving it.

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Frederick Bouchard here is powering B. No. 264–350′–

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Evening Tide with B. No. 262--350′– and

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the 317′ loa B. No. 250, pushed by Evening Star.  My point was how large and capacious these barges are . . . ,

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and that is measured in barrels of capacity, not feet.  For these barges then, here’s that info:

B. No. 250                    = 59,000 brls

B. No. 260, 262, 264  =  60,000

B. No. 280                    =  80,000

B. No. 220                     = 110,000 brl

 

In many situations, fuel is measured in metric tons, as covered here.

And this tangent started out with photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

Land mass area can be quantified in square miles, but I’d love to work with a mathematician to measure the area within NYC limits which is navigable, i.e., the sixth boro.  Of course, “navigable” would need defining too. Immeasurable, of course, is the number of photos  taken daily of vessels with the sixth boro.

Like this one of Crystal Cutler pushing

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Patricia E. Poling westbound at the Brooklyn Bridge.

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Taft Beach pushes BMLP 703 and 305 in the opposite direction.   Also working recently have been

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Paul Andrew with scrap,

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Sarah Ann with more scrap,

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Thomas D. Witte with crane barge Columbia,

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James E. Brown with a spud barge,

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and Fort Schuyler in various locations.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated, here’s an interesting video on the salvage of  Modern Express . . . passed along by JM.

Also, as we near the mermaid parade, here are details on a performance to get you in the mood, an adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s the “Fisherman and his Soul.”

 

This is a repost of the 4th photo in the post from two days ago, showing General Humphreys.

bt5CORPS OF ENGINEERS 85ft INSPECTION BOAT GENERAL HUMPHREYS 3- 19- 1928

I repost because Dan Owen responded as follows:   “General Humphreys was rebuilt into a conventional tug in 1950, 76 x 18.2 x 6.6, reportedly had two GM 6-71 diesels, 330 hp., which would have made it away under-powered. Data is very sketchy but I have a photo taken at Levingston Shipbuilding Co., Orange, Tex., which is undated but may be where it was rebuilt. I am sending this photo as it is the only one I have showing the SARAH R. II as an operating tug. This is a contact photo made from an original negative and is starting to turn yellow with age, hence the fading, but if the photo was made in 1950 at the time of rebuilding.

fb1Sarah R II (Boat Photo Museum)

Louisiana Marine Repair and Service Co., Inc., Baton Rouge, owned it in 1950.  They sold it in March 1966 to John C. Jackson, Jr., dba River & Canal Enterprises, Inc., Baton Rouge.
In Nov. 1976, still owned by Jackson, but removed from documentation as dismantled.  For many years the SARAH R. II was lying along the bank of the Port Allen-Morgan City Route of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway at Plaquemine, La. It may still be there.   I am also attaching two photos of the SARAH R II in this derelict condition.”   Anyone know what remains at that location?
fb2Sarah R II #2 (Boat Photo Museum)

 

fb3Sarah R II #3 (Boat Photo Museum)

Many thanks to Dan Owens for his quick follow up and permission to post these photos.  Hats off to all of you out there working today, like Taft Beach.

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This collage of orange and blue indicates that something unusual approaches . . .

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0846 hr . . .

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0904

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Atlantic Salvor might have been headed out on a long range mission, but

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at this point, I realized this mission would begin in the Lower Bay of the sixth boro along with

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lots of other vessels, although

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something new this year was the escort of four commercial tugs:  Sassafras, Miriam Moran, 

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Atlantic Salvor, and Normandy.   1150.    I was happy to find someone to talk to.

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It’s fleet week NYC.  Welcome all.

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It’s USS DDG 96,

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HMCS D 282,

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WMEC 911,

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HMCS MM 700,

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HMCS MM 708,

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LHD 5,

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DDG 99,

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and LSD 43.

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At 1216, Eric McAllister joins the welcome party . . .

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WLM 552.

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An E-2 flew by too.

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The message on the port wheel well ((?) amused me.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was last year’s arrival.

 

Yesterday was National Maritime Day.  At the edges of the Upper Bay, people associated with the maritime industries gather for a memorial.

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at Marisol Escobar’s American Merchant Mariners’ Memorial statue.

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Two of the newest tugboats in the sixth boro–Fort Schuyler and Kings Point, named for two area maritime academies–stood off.

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Service and sacrifice were honored.

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Prayers and

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other words were offered by SCI’s Rev. David Rider and Marad’s Paul “Chip” Jaenichen.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the first time I used this title.

America II looked resplendent bathed in a last burst of late afternoon sun yesterday.

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She was one of several sail vessels out;  here Pioneer seems headed over to a new loading point.

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On a meteorologically different afternoon a few weeks ago, I caught Lettie G. Howard out headed for the Kills. Here was another spring when I caught Lettie under very bare poles.

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I saw Topaz briefly only once, so far away she was only a tall mast, but Claude Scales caught this from his daily vantage point.  Click here for a close-up of Nantucket WLV-612 from three years ago.

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No words . . . no gilding the lily!

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Pioneer heads back to the dock.

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Anyone know where Mary E is sailing from these days?

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Thanks to Claude Scales for use of his Topaz photo.  All other photos by Will Van Dorp, who has used the title “autumn sail” much more frequently.  And if you have not yet read my article about sailing to Cuba last winter, you can read it here.

I suppose I could call this RT 163b, since the photos in both were taken the same day, same conditions of light and moisture.

Let’s start with Charles D. McAllister with Lettie G. Howard bare poles in the distance.

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Evelyn Cutler with Noelle Cutler is tied up alongside a barge with Wavertree‘s still horizontal poles. Click here to see Evelyn as I first saw her.

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Viking is high and dry, post the winter work.

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Timothy L. Reinauer is back in town after a very long hiatus, at least from my POV.  This may have been the last time I saw her.

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Mary Gellatly gets some TLC as well;  click here for the previous time she was in a “random” post.

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Beyond Mister Jim, a pile of sand is growing in the yard just west of the Bayonne Bridge on the Staten Island side.

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Elizabeth and Marjorie B. McAllister head out for a job.

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Tasman Sea heads for the yard as

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Amberjack departs.

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And for closure, it’s Marjorie B passing in front of a relatively ship-free Port Elizabeth.  Click here for a photo of Marjorie B high and dry a few years ago.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And in contrast to all that, in Niigata earlier today, here’s some great vessel christening photos from Maasmondmaritime.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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