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Sometimes I know what these are or it is.  In this case, I don’t.  Photo is not the sharpest, but this cargo does intrigue.

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Likely, the top photo and the two below are unrelated.  Ashley Hutto took the top on Sunday, and I took the bottom two Saturday.

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The cargo on the barge pushed by Sarah Ann is uncovered and looks more like an art project, whereas the cargo pushed by Susan Miller looks more utilitarian, but I’ve erred before.

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Do you remember this cargo from November 2012?  I knew what it was, but I would not otherwise have guessed that it would become

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part of this.

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Many thanks to Ashley for the top photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m surprised I’ve not heard this be called DUBQEG, “down under Brooklyn-Queens Expressway of Gowanus” a la DUMBO.

I was here last week waiting for … and when the twin bascules of the Hamilton Street Bridge, I thought it was someone else, but

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I was equally pleased to see Sarah Ann–previously June K–arrive to exchange scrap scows,

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exchanging the light 141 for the loaded 136.

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Two things that really impressed me were (1. the intensity of multi-modal traffic at this location and

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(2. the gentleness with which the Sarah Ann crew negotiated her 2700 hp in such confined space.

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And yes that is a Coney Island bound F train approaching the Smith-Ninth Street Station, the highest subway stop in the system, one from which you can see the Statue.

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Scrapping needs to happen somewhere in the city,

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and it continues to be one aspect of marine commerce in Gowanus.

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Bravo to the Sarah Ann crew for their impressive work.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

What’s prompted the reappearance of the past here is that I’ve been sorting my archives.

So let’s start in April 2008, and this vessel will reappear tomorrow.   I miss that orange in the harbor.

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This is November 2009.  Where is McAllister Brothers (built as Dalzelleagle) these days?

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This is what Eagle Service (now Genesis Eagle) looked like in March 2010.

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Here’s a closer up of the vintage Horizon ship.  Is she still in lay up?

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Ivory Coast, headed into the KVK here on a foggy morning, appeared almost to be floating on air above the water’s surface.

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And here, a mysterious swimmer, Edith Thornton (now in Trinidad as Chassidy?), and a Hanjin ship.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders who says things stay the same.

I have many more Gmelin photos, but as an indication that I still inhabit the present-day sixth boro, I’ll show some sign of life for a few days.

For outatowners, Gowanus Creek (now Canal) is one of the most polluted waterways in the US, which is no secret to locals.  By the way, Gowanus rhymes with “you want us” with a silent “t.”

I took this photo this week just upstream of the 9th Street Bridge.  In fact, when a man swam down the Canal last year, he wore some serious hazmat protection, as the Media Boat shows here.

What I was not aware of is how much effort is going into addressing the accumulated pollution of more than a century.

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This barge holds several excavators at work in the Fourth Street Turning Basin, one of the dead ends in the Canal.

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As needed, the barge is moved by this small tug/pushboat that might be called 1337E.

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Besides black goop that I might photograph next time, wood and other detritus is being plucked from the bottom.

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Gowanus, there’s hope.  I’ll be back.

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Click here and here for some posts I did when I last visited the Canal . . . in 2011 and 2013.

As to connections between the Gowanus area of Brooklyn and the Erie Canal, click here.  For a photo of the Gowanus Bay New York State Canal Freight Terminal, click here and scroll to p. 22.

SS George Washington was launched from Newport News Shipbuilding in November 1924 to operate on the Old Dominion Line between NYC and Norfolk.  It was sold to Eastern Steamship Lines in 1927.   Mr. Gmelin marked this photo–where she carries the logo on Eastern Steamship Lines on her funnel–as 1940, making it a photo of the ship near the end of its life on that run. But there were other exciting lives to come.

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After the war, it ran very briefly for Alaska Transport Company (ATCo.) between Seattle and Alaska in 1948, until ATCo went bankrupt the same year.  A French company named CGT bought her in 1949, renamed her SS Gascogne (sometimes spelled Gascoigne), ran her in the Caribbean for a while and in 1952 sold her to Messageries-Maritimes, who operated her in Indochina until she was scrapped in Hong Kong in 1955.  Quite the journey for this US East coast steamer named for POTUS 1, and what stories have been lost with her forever;  I guess some clever novelist will have to make them up.

Her Newport News Shipbuilding/Old Dominion Line twin–Robert E. Lee–was torpedoed and sunk in 1942.

Yesterday’s post showed the 1923 SS California, which was launched with three funnels until it the two dummies were removed.

The SS California below was launched in 1928 to operate as a vessel in the Panama Pacific division of the American Line Steamship Company, as shown below.  But a decade later, it was sold to the United States Maritime Commission, which modified it extensively to comply with new fireproofing requirements post-Morro Castle fire.   They also removed one of the funnels and renamed the vessel SS Uraguay.  Click here to see the two superstructures on the hull side by side.

Mr. Gmelin caught it here passing the Jersey-side Holland Tunnel vent.  Anyone have guesses on the two ferries shown?

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Actually this first in this series started here.   The ship is SS California, launched in April  1923.  If you look at the top photo in the link in the previous sentence, you’ll see this SS California started with three funnels, although it’s likely that two of the three were dummies.  Extra “dummy” funnels were “style enhancements,” added for appearance.  Notice the Lipton Tea building along the water in Hoboken?  The photo was cropped as shown.  Anyone help identify the tugboat company?

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As I mentioned in the September post linked above, I bought an album of prints at an antique shop in Oswego NY on one of my stops there this summer.  We were spending extra time there to replace a prop dinged on an immovable uncharted underwater obstruction.   Thanks to William Lafferty, I’ve learned that Mr. Gmelin “was a Cranford, New Jersey, based amateur photographer and maritime historian. He was one of the earliest members of the Steamship Historical Society of America and an occasional contributor to its journal, Steamboat Bill [now called Power Ships]. He died in 2001 at the age of eighty-eight.”  Click here and scroll for a photo of Mr. Gmelin, whose full name including the first name spelling I used above was stamped on the back of most of the photos.

Click here for SHSA’s online gallery.

It appears I’ve not put up a batch of photos of this handy floating fuel station since here, but I’ll have to check the archives later today.  For now, these are photos of Chandra B and her hard-working crew I took last week.  Know the location?

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The two buildings through-lit by sunrise are Nouvel’s 100 Eleventh Avenue and Gehry’s IAC Building.

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And in the recesses along Chelsea Piers, Chandra B is well into its workday as the sun rises.  Here she tops off Utopia III.

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Chandra B‘s crew is ready for lunch before most people have breakfast.

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Click here for some of my Chandra B photos from Professional Mariner magazine.

 

I did this once before here.  This time I was deleting near duplicates to limit the size of my photo library to accommodate the many photos I brought back from the gallivants, and my mind quickly formed today’s post.  Enjoy all these from August through October 2009 and marvel at how much the harbor changes.   As I went through the archives, this is where I stopped, given the recent developments in Bella Bella BC.

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For background on this tug, check here.

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Notice also the Bayonne approach to the bridge.

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IMO 8983117 was still orange back then.

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King Philip, Thomas Dann, and Patriot Service . . .

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Odin . . .  now has a fixed profile.

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And these two clean looking machines — Coral Queen and

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John B. Caddell — were still with us.

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This is a digression to March 2010, but since I’m in a temporally warped thought, let me add this photo of the long-gone Kristin Poling.

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Back to 2009, Rosemary looked sweet here in fall scenes.

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John Reinauer . . . I wonder what that tug looks like today over in Nigeria.

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And Newtown Creek, now the deep Lady Luck of the Depths, sure looked good back then.

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And while I’m at it, I’ve finally solved a puzzle that’s bugged me for a few years.  Remember this post from three and a half years ago about a group of aging Dutch sailors who wanted to hold a reunion on their vessel but couldn’t find the boat, a former Royal Dutch Navy tug named Wamandai A870?  Well, here’s the boat today!  Well, maybe . . .

Another boat you can dive on is United Caribbean aka Golden Venture.

Photos and tangents by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s the series that this follows, a series that shows how busy this craneship still is at certain times of the year.  Of course, this could also be called what do you do with an obsolete New York City ferry, a vessel delivered by Electric Boat on October 14, 1929 and replaced by a bridge in fewer than 10 years.

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Yes, this is the bow of the craneship, and until I spent a day on board last fall, I assumed the bow wheel was non-functioning if even present.

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Excuse the rain spot.

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Closeups of bow and

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stern.

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Here’s a shot from the deck of Wards Island from the incredible warm late November day last year when we pulled a day’s worth of buoys from Oneida Lake, and at the

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end of the day, getting a glimpse of the builders plate in the engine compartment.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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