You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘New York harbor’ category.

Hats off to the small boats that work all year round . . . crew boats,

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patrol boats,

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fishing boats,

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line boats,

pilot boats,

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dive boats,

more fishing boats,

more crew boats,

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government boats,

more —soon to face major cuts--government boats

more line and boom boats,

and here’s a special . . . a historic life boat, long atop Binghamton, which is still intact as far as I know, and a bit longer ago had

guys in hazmat suits doing the last ever lifeboat drill aboard the 112-year-old condemned ferry.

And finally, of course there’s the New York Media Boat. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who gives a hat tip to all the crews in small boats on the big waters.

 

Surprises can be ranked in degrees.  Here was a surprise . . . people walking way up on the Bayonne Bridge back in 2011.  Ditto here I was looking into a hot tub on the stern of a scrap-carrying bunker (photo#7).

The surprises in this post emerge slowly.

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This PCTC has been on this blog before, as has Kirby Moran.

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That it’s called Don Juan was surprising the first time I saw it, but this line names some of its vessels after characters from opera, so Don Juan fits.

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But the detail below–just forward of the radomes– blew me away.  In fact, when I took the photo, I had no idea what it was, maybe some netting, I imagined.  But a painted-on bower?  Or is it painted on . . . maybe it’s real bougainvillea?  Is there a Don Juan aboard who uses this as his love nest?  Here’s stanza XVIII from Lord Byon’s epic Don Juan Canto 1:

Perfect she was, but as perfection is
Insipid in this naughty world of ours,
Where our first parents never learned to kiss
Till they were exiled from their earlier bowers,
Where all was peace, and innocence, and bliss,[b]
(I wonder how they got through the twelve hours),
Don José, like a lineal son of Eve,
Went plucking various fruit without her leave.

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Next . . . even stranger, I think.  See TS Kennedy over next to the GMD Graving Dock and Anthem of the Seas out beyond that?  Surprise?

Version 2

A giraffe?!  !@#!

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Maybe it’s an amusement.  Maybe it’s a stand-in for emergency drills?  I went looking and found out about Gigi.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Let me start here . . . the boat below can be yours.  Click on the photo for full information.  It’s currently in the Seattle area, and I’m posting this for a friend.

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Turecamo Girls –this one was launched in 1965 and is rated at 1950 hp.  Here was a previous version, which may or may not still be working in South America.

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Gulf Venture–She’s a new vessel in this harbor.  Launched in 2016 and “married” to Gulf Carrier, call her powerful at 5150 hp.

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Any guesses?

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Tangier Island, the tug, 2014 and 3000 h.

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Mister Jim, 1982 and 1800 hp.

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This Stephanie Dann, 1978 and 3200.

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Evening Mist, 1976 and 3000.

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Here she’s framed by the bow of Yantian Express.

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Finally, James Turecamo, 1969 and 2000.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recalls a wonderful tour of parts of the Salish Sea aboard Coot (for sale above) almost seven years ago here.

It seemed just a few weeks ago I’d seen her, but it was just over 60 days, the time it takes to get from the sixth boro to China and back.  But there she was passing Robbins Reef Light.

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Starboard and

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port, she was controlled,

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starboard, port, and

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more.

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Evergreen was founded by Chang Yung-Fa with a single ship in 1968.

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Anyone visit their maritime museum in Taipei City?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

A week and a bit ago just after noon one day,

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I caught CMA CGM Moliere heading for Port Elizabeth

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and the next morning just before 9, I caught her bound for sea.

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I’ve no idea how many boxes were shifted, but that’s not a lot of time in port.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who thinks you might be interested in reading this Workboat article about the new fleet of passenger boats heading from MetalShark to the sixth boro soon.

 

I don’t care that it’s February, but the number of subsequent days with temperatures over 50 degrees in the sixth bor0 tells me it is spring–or has been.

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Notice the difference between Severn and Fort Schuyler?  Here proximity highlights the difference in height of the upper wheelhouse,

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but Severn is of the 4200 hp class and fort Schuyler, the 3000.

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Ah, the line and boom boats.

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Joan is one of the Moran “giraffe” boats and see HR Otter?

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She reminds me of the long gone Odin.

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Here’s a closer-up of the HR Otter, a name that immediately conjures up Kenneth Grahame.

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Some different pairs are possible here, and they’d be the same.

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See the pair there?

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a pair of hands.  Is there a word for the painted design centered on the bow of some vessels, like figureheads but not?

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Hope they clap for mardi gras!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Grace is a 113,000 dwt tanker delivered less than a year ago by the Guangzhou Shipyard, north of Hong Kong and China’s third largest city.  

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Is this the look of future tankers in the sixth boro?

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Jonathan C. assists her from her berth.  I may be mistaken, but 10 years ago, few if any cargo vessels of this size called in the sixth boro.

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Ten years ago there were also no 6000 hp assist tugs in the port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for a Navig8 vessel in our fair port from nine years ago.

This is a maneuver I always enjoy watching.

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It’s a case of getting the ship off the dock and rotating it in the desired direction within a confined space, with little room for error.

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Not over powering is part of the process, I  gather.

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Quick . . . name that tug?

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If this is New York, it’s likely one of two.

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Oops.

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As it heads out to sea, the playmaker

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leaves the ship and goes off to the next job.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Let me start with the oldest ones not yet published.  There’s something timely about Tracy, the vessel below.  I took the photo from mid river between Ogdensburg NY and Prescott ON.  Are you hankering for a project?  Details below.

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The next day I got this photo as we entered Oswego.  RV Kaho was christened in this post I did a little over two years before.  Its mission is research on habitat and fish in Lake Ontario.  Here’s an article on that christening that mentions the meaning of the name in Ojibwe.

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I shot this last week as it was tied up at the dry dock in Bayonne, and wish I could have gotten closer.  Ferdinand R. Hassler was christened in 2012.  Its namesake is this gentleman, distinguished in two countries.

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Line has had light work this season in its role as a 65′ ice breaker.  Here’s an article I did on this 54-year-old vessel a few years back.

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I’m not sure where 343 is these days;  Feehan seems to be covering the North River these days.  Click here for photos of Feehan as she transited from Lake Ontario to the sixth boro.

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Fire Fighter II passes the hose rack–not water hoses–on the KVK.

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And here’s a twofer… a Staten Island ferry and a small USACE survey boat, I believe.

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So here’s why the top photo of Tracy is timely;  it’s for sale.    The minimum bid is $250,000 Canadian, which is a mere $189,880 US, given today’s exchange rate.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

You can call this “three of five,” and enjoy the photos of her predecessors–Star and Sailhere, leaving Sun and Sky yet to come;  the builder is Chinese .  .  .  the Hudong-Zhonghua Shipyard, an enterprise going back to the 1920s.

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As Atlantic Sea made the turn into the KVK, i imagined her as an errant passenger vessel;  from this angle, she bears little resemblance to previous generations of container ships.

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I wonder if these lights stay on at sea.

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To see what she looks like below the waterline, click here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m adding this link after posting because it tells a story I’d never heard:  the sinking of an ACL vessel during the Falklands War here.  It has LOTS of photos. Thanks to RG.  Here are more photos.  And more.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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