You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘New York harbor’ category.

Sometimes I like to start new categories so that the numbers don’t get so high, boats no longer extant or frequent get a second look, and we realize that time is passing pretty fast.  So all the photos here I took more than seven years ago.  Some have been on the blog before, but not together and not edited exactly as they are now.

Like Norwegian Sea, she used to be a wintertime staple running up the River, easily recognizable by her upper wheelhouse.

Juliet is still around but not very busy under her new name . . . it seems.

This boat, like her namesake, is gone too soon. Pegasus is still around but no longer looks this way.

Zeus was on the Great Lakes after working in the sixth boro, but I’ve lost track of her.

Volunteer, another unmistakable profile, now long time gone from here.

Zachery  . . . still around and still working. High Peace is now registered Vietnamese and goes by Pvt Dolphin.

Just to break the pattern here, here’s a photo I took of Zachery a few days ago.

Take my word for this last photo . . . the distant unit I can’t identify although I’m guessing a Reinauer boat, but the closer vessel is outrageous.  Actually I mean Outrageous.  That’s the name.  Click here (and scroll) for a previous photo of Outrageous, which I believe used to be based in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Coming out of Newark Bay,

Hudson, the newest Vane 4200.

And a bit later, exiting the Arthur Kill past Shooters Island, it’s

Neptune, the former Chevron Snohomish.

 

I’ve not seen Neptune here much, and

here, thanks to Jonathan Steinman, here’s the first I see of Hudson pushing a barge likely toward the mid North Shore of Isle of Long.

All but the last photo by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Here was the first of Don’s great photos, from about a year ago.  And technically, it follows from this set of pizza seawall delivery photos I caught almost a decade ago.

Your own galley turns out some delicious fare, but sometimes you feel a craving for take out, for pizza that comes in a box, which is not so easy when you’re away from shore, but then, delivery . . .

for all!  And even an average pizza is

delectable!  And the photos, they give an exquisite hint of sixth boro culture.   Sometimes bumboats –like this one once did on the Great Lakes–do this, and more regularly crew boats do. No matter how an unexpected pizza gets delivered, the very unexpectedness of it makes it even tastier.

 

Thanks much to Don for use of these photos, especially for you who didn’t see them on FB.

 

I didn’t want to overload yesterday’s post, so I’m continuing it here.

08:44

To add a detail here, each time a ship or boat big or small approached, someone up there sounded an aerosol can horn;  once the vessel passed, a second “all clear” blast was made.

And whereas larger vessels stayed the middle of the channel, smaller ones like Jessica Ann prudently avoided the center of the channel above which the bridge work was happening.

08:45

 

08:46

08:59

Just a bit more info on the ship . . . she’s not that large (997′ x 131′) although I don’t know her air draft.  She’s not new . . .

launched in 2003 as Maersk Kolkata. as you can see from the remnant seven-pointed star. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The 1931 bridge has been so prominent on this blog over the past decade plus that the past few years of construction and now deconstruction mesmerize me.  Just look at the header photo I’ve not changed since 2006.  I’ll never change it now.

I spent a few hours watching the work yesterday and share some of the photos here today and tomorrow.  Photo 1 was taken at 06:49 before work began, from what I could tell;  I’m the observer only and speculate sometimes because I’m not privy to the communications.  NY is to the left and NJ to the right.

06:54 … NJ side.  A safety and planning meeting?

07:01.  Workers use various means to venture out to the severed transverse beam (?) to begin its removal.

07:30.  Similar activity starts on the NY side.

07:52

08:25.  Almost imperceptibly slow, the movement of the transverse progresses.

08:28.  And then it speeds up.

08:36.  A flatbed trailer has backed into place to receive the beam.

08:38.  Meanwhile, over on the NJ side, a similar evolution has begun.

08:39.

Meanwhile, at 08:43, a container vessel is rounding Bergen bend  and headed for sea, after “threading the needle,”  …  well, not really, it made it in with those beams in place . . .

08:43, and we’ll pick up the evolution here tomorrow with MSC Kolkata   . . .  Note the crewmen on the bow?

I’d like to give a hat tip to all the Bayonne Bridge workers who work with such skill and safety in this enormous project, one of at least six bridge projects happening simultaneously in the greater sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Kirby Moran here seems to have some symbiosis going on with the gulls,

and Jonathan C comes in for a closer look.

Zachery Reinauer repositions light under the parking lot forming on the lower deck of the Bayonne Bridge.

Diana B moves another load of product, likely to the creeks.

 

Thomas D. Witte is on the paper recycling run, I think.

Does anyone have a photo of her working up in the canals?

I’ve not yet seen Sapphire Coast light.

And finally, the unique paint scheme on Balisco 100 

moved into the Kills by Navigator.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

She was working in the sixth boro long before I lived here, as I understand it, a former Department of Sanitation tug. 

And although my “sampling” by no stretch qualifies as scientific, it seems she’s often towing this way, on gate lines. Here and here are some previous appearances of Buchanan 1 towing on lines.

Of course, this method of towing can be seen often enough, like here, here, and here.

Here’s a close up.

And here, from almost exactly three years ago, is B1′s fleet mate Mister T doing the same westbound of the East River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Name that tugboat?

Or this one?

Or these two?  Answer follows.

Enjoy the rest of these for what they are . . .

Bruce A. McAllister above and Fort McHenry below.

Meredith C. Reinauer on a sunny but

cold morning.   Ready for the answers on the first three?

Well, the first was Kimberly Poling, then

Dace Reinauer, which I first saw looking like this.

And finally Emily Ann, which reminds me of an email I once receivedfrom a reader named R. Pena, who wanted to track down the boat to which he owed his life after his own had sunk between Cuba and Florida.  I embed the link to that post here because it’s a story that bears repetition.

And finally pushing New Hampshire around,

it’s Scott Turecamo.  As a former resident of that state, I thought no one ever pushed New Hampshire around!

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

 

If you want to see what I’ve done with this title in the past, click here.

I’ll reveal this set of photos without explaining what’s going on.  Check out the six people in this photo.  They divide into two groups by “uniform,” but how are they related?

 

I might add that these photos are shown in reverse chronological order.

 

See the two men (or one of them at that moment) atop the superstructure in the photo below?

Now we’re moving forward in time again.

 

So the two groups of six total men in the top photo have nothing to do with each other.  The ship’s crew wearing orange were simply photographing the bridge work, demolition at this point.  I can’t say if they communicated, but my guess is that at their closest they were within 50 feet of each other.

 

All photo by Will Van Dorp.

 

Oh . .  I don’t mean the boat that more than

once caught my attention from miles away because of that glowing color back ten years ago.

Not that striking prime mover . . . that seemed always engaged.

No, I mean

her fine namesake who passed a week ago.  My condolences to her family and close friends.   Waterskiing the East River?  I wish I had photographed that!

 

Here are some classic Tennyson words.

Click here for more pics of the orange June K and fleet mates.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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