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Some people are up before dawn on Easter because of work.  But at sunrise this morning from Bard Street and looking west . . . it was gray.

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Looking east . . . dawn smudged the rosy fingers’ painting.   Lucy Reinauer pushed RTC 83 in that direction, while the Moran 6000 hp tractors returned to the barn after helping Hanjin Shenzhen out to sea and southbound.

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And the Bayonne windmill has revived its current production.  Passing it in order were JRT Moran,

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and James D.  In the distance, that’s Barney Turecamo and

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Miriam also passed.

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Caitlin Ann and

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Hunting Creek also worked their way into Easter morning.

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And I decided to get to work also.  All photos by Will Van Dorp, who did versions 1 and 2 of this in previous years.  Here was a different take on Easter.  As for Caitlin Ann’s being blue . . .

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here’s how I first saw her.

 

I put these photos up because not everyone saw them on FB.

I took these photos of Specialist in October of 2010, before she went to Puerto Rico.

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Meow Man took the next two yesterday on the KVK as she passed by on a barge after she was raised.  RIP.

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The bottom two photos used by permission from Meow Man.

The top two by Will Van Dorp.

Many thanks to Erin Urban, executive director of Noble Maritime for those photos and information.

What’s this?

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The interior view is unique;  the exterior  . . . of course has been seen so often that your eyes might see right past it.  This beacon in the harbor has appeared in countless tugster posts, and will continue to do so.  Here’s just one. What you may not know is that in the lighthouse there is a “construction cam” focused on work at the New York Wheel.  Be sure to try “live stream cam 2” and its time lapse.  

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Below is a view of CMA CGM La Scala from a week ago, the same day the Noble Maritime crew was at the light.

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Here’s the abridged written report:

“Weather:  Cloudy, not windy, mid-60s°      Access:  The Emily Miller out; the Nicholas Miller back.  Left at 9:20; back at 12:30.

Tasks accomplished:  We brought out materials with which to clean up, including contractor’s bags, brooms, cardboard boxes, and another dustpan.  We also brought out a 60 lb. bag of mortar and water.  We added a new light in the cellar and brought out two more Mag lights and a long extension cord so we can light the cellar and any other places that need it.  We also brought out another 5-gallon can of gasoline.

André cemented the area in the cellar below the new cellar door.

Pete and Kevin got the light set up in the basement and then began the clear out.  Then, with Erin, they began removing accumulated trash and unneeded equipment.  We cleaned and cleared all the rooms, especially the second floor supply room and the stairwell, and organized a tool cabinet on the first floor.  We found a box of stuff having to do with the web camera and stored it on the fourth floor in the room where the web camera batteries are set up.

The New York Wheel worker charged up the batteries for the web camera and got it working again; it had been down since last fall.

Next steps: We will go out to do more work on the interior.   We have to shovel out the cellar, for example, and finish painting the small rooms on the fourth level.

We will at the same time do a video explaining all the aspects of the work we have to do at the lighthouse.  Our spring projects will include getting more ventilation and painting the exterior so we can set up the canopy and the solar power to light the interior and exterior of the site.”

Click here for a USCG history of aids to navigation.  Here are some 360 degrees views from Robbins Reef.

Many thanks to Erin and her crew for their work and for permission to use these photos and this report.

At the same moment, I was getting these photos of CMA CGM La Scala, with JRT Moran tailing and

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Kirby Moran made up to the lower set of recessed shell bits.

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Last two photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’ve been waiting to get a good photo of the latest FDNY vessel under way and I caught it here the other day.

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Her top speed exceeds 40 knots, an important feature given the need to urgently respond to a crisis.

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Another relatively new government boat in the harbor is NYPD 621, P. O. Harry R. Ryman.  

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Of course, RIBs like 25713 are always out and training.

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And finally, I’m guessing this is a government boat, given where it was, but it has no marking on it at all.  Anyone help?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

“Backing down” is a term I’ve heard used to describe a ship assist in which the tugboats control the sternwise movement of a vessel away from a dock.  Most of the work here seems to be tide current driven, if I saw it right.

Let’s pick this up at 16:28 hrs.

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The evolution waits for incoming traffic, in this case Seoul Express, which I watched getting backed down half a decade ago here and here.  Margaret Moran was involved that time as well.

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At 16:49, Seoul Express, accompanied by Kirby Moran, is passing and Margaret throttles up, catching

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the attention of a crew member on the superstructure of Seoul Express.

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By 16:51, Heina is well away from the dock, and now

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James D.Moran needs to get the stern out, but I’m not well placed to capture that.

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Margaret moves around to the bulb.  I love how the load markings mimic the tug profile.

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By 16:58, Heina is at least two ship lengths east of the salt dock, and

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by 17:07, Heina has begun to rotate counterclockwise in preparation to head under the VZ Bridge out to sea.  By now, she’s south of the Bahamas.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, to whose untrained eyes this all seemed to evolve with masterful control.

As to the meaning of “heina,” try this.

If you have a lot of free time, you can trace this back to the first installment.

These photos are all from the past week, starting out with Bouchard Boys, 1975.

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Pelham, 1960.  Behind her is USNS Red Cloud.

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Barney Turecamo (1995) and

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Scott Turecamo (1998).

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Eric R. Thornton (1960)

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Jill Reinauer (1967) and Dace Reinauer (1968) with RTC 61.

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Add Stephen-Scott (1967) and Ruth M. Reinauer (2008) pushing RTC 102.

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Margaret Moran (1979) starting a backing-down of Heina with

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James D. Moran (2015).  More on this backing down later this week.

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Captain D (1974) with CVA-604.

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Meagan Ann (1975)

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Houma (1970).

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Frances (1957) and I think I know the crewman forward of the house.

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And finally, I put this photo here because of a boat in the background.  Is that Kristy Ann Reinauer (1962)?  I thought she was scrapped half a year ago already.  Hmm.

Other boats here are L. to r.) Realist, Kristy Ann, Hubert Bays, Long Splice, Samantha Miller, Stephen B, and Hunt Girls, which has been in the yard there for (?) two years now?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

As you know, tugboats do all manner of work on the water.  They push train cars, increasingly these years–according to Peter D’Amato— after quite the plummet.

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Tugboat here is James E. Brown with barge 278.

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Christine M. McAllister is a 6000 hp tug that usually

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wired to RTC 502.

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Ditto Evelyn Cutler, usually working with Noelle Cutler.

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Mister Jim here is pushing sand (or aggregate?), and

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Gateway’s Navigator is pushing a newly painted GT Coast Trader dredge scow, in the same time/harbor as

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Balisco Marine Service’ Navigator pushes oil.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who offers this bonus below.

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Prayers for and condolences to families/friends of Specialist crew.  Here’s a photo I took of the boat back in 2007.

 

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Here was Janet D pushing crane barge Jared Walter the other day.

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Another crane barge, this one pushed by Quenames, which I never seen pushing anything but a petroleum barge.

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Tugboat Sassafras moving Doubleskin 30 into IMTT, and then going over to Brooklyn light.

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And finally, it’s Harry McNeal and Miss Julia  . .. again moving crane barges.

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Last one for today . . . it’s JRT Moran, and those do not look like deckhands on the bow.  I’m just wondering.

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The container ship being assisted is Northern Justice.

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No matter what you do, be careful out there.  Here’s the latest USCG report I could find.

Once upon a time in the sixth boro, there was a tug named Odin.  The photo below is from April 2010.

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Yesterday, I first thought Odin had returned, although I know that is not possible.

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Pike comes to CMT from the cleanup project up on the Champlain Canal.  Siblings of Pike back then were Hawk, Beaver, Otter, and Bass, some of which can be seen here.

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For now, let me just say I love the color scheme.  For history on Pike, click here.

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She’d be ideal for work on the Erie Canal, I’d think.

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And if you never saw Odin, here are a few more photos from 2010, and

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–is that a bell on the port rail?–

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and one photo from September 2008, showing how high she could raise the house.  To see how low she went, click here.

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Odin has since been completely (!!!) rebuilt and now looks like this, believe it or not.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Navigator . . . until I looked carefully, I assumed she operated out of the Chesapeake/Elizabeth River in Virginia, because her colors are similar to tugs like Kodiak.   But I stand corrected . . . Balisco Marine Services . . . I had not known that name.

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And Realist, the nearer tug, I thought she was always at the dock, as here, tied in front of Hubert Bays.

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Well, yesterday, Realist crossed the Upper Bay when I was there, and she needed the upper wheelhouse to see over GL66.

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Below is a photo of Realist, taken not quite a year ago.  In this batch of photos here from Paul Strubeck, you’ll find a photo of Realist fleet mate Specialist.

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Here’s Dolphin, which I last saw in the Mississippi here almost a year and a half ago.

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Yesterday the 70 degree air temperatures made the Upper Bay quite foggy, a nice effect.

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And finally . . . Genesis Liberty, you can see her here in some of her previous lives– Hornbeck and before– in this post from eight years ago!!

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Eight years ago, the skyline didn’t look this way either.

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For more older photos of two of the tugs in today’s post, click here, a post from three years ago.

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All the photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

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