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Each year around this time, SUNY Maritime cadets go to sea.  Click here for photos from last year’s departure and here, for ports throughout the summer.  You can track the vessel here.

Here was a clue that a ship was headed this way.

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The next three photos here come from Roger Munoz, high atop the 74th St ConEd plant.

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That’s Roosevelt Island on the other side, at the southern tip of which i waited.

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Here the training ship passes under the 59th Street Bridge,

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and past the Empire State Building . . .

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escorted by a fireboat and

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two McAllister tugboats.

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Some of the cadets who made this journey last summer are already employed as professional mariners today.  And somewhat related, any guesses how long ago this particular T/S Empire State, the VI,  was launched?  Click here for info on her former life.   To see some dramatic shots of the knife edge cutting through the middle of the Atlantic, click here.  If you’re impatient, jump ahead to the 3-minute mark.

Thanks much to Roger Munoz, a SUNY grad,  for the three photos from high atop the East River.

And here is a time lapse gif of ES VI passing, thanks to Rand Miller.

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So were the words of a bold attendant to Queen Victoria when the royal yacht was bested by a strange-looking upstart vessel from the former colonies called America.  As the Queen revealed her ignorance of the rules, I too must confess that–like a an inhabitant recently retrieved from a remote island and watching a MLB or NFL game for the first time–I was largely unaware of what I was seeing.  No matter, I enjoyed it and hope you enjoy these photos.

First, the muster. If you want the instructions, click here.

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It certainly appears the Japanese boat here is being towed.  Is this to demonstrate the foiling or train for it?  Here’s an explanation of how these 3000-pound vessels fly .. . or foil.

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If it seems that all the boats are identical except for the sponsors, you’re right.

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The logo at the top of all the mainsails is for Louis Vuitton.  Can someone explain why a trunk maker chooses to sponsor this race?   Isn’t it somewhat like an Indy car race sponsored by Victorias Secret, Epifanes,  or Penguin Books?

No matter, notice the throngs along the shore and the ledge of the building to the left?  I think of the third and fourth paragraphs from Moby Dick:

“Go from Corlears Hook to Coenties Slip, and from thence, by Whitehall, northward. What do you see?—Posted like silent sentinels all around the town, stand thousands upon thousands of mortal men fixed in ocean reveries. Some leaning against the spiles; some seated upon the pier-heads; some looking over the bulwarks of ships from China; some high aloft in the rigging, as if striving to get a still better seaward peep. But these are all landsmen; of week days pent up in lath and plaster—tied to counters, nailed to benches, clinched to desks. How then is this? Are the green fields gone? What do they here?

But look! here come more crowds, pacing straight for the water, and seemingly bound for a dive. Strange! Nothing will content them but the extremest limit of the land; loitering under the shady lee of yonder warehouses Battery Park City will not suffice. No. They must get just as nigh the water as they possibly can without falling in. And there they stand—miles of them—leagues. Inlanders all, they come from lanes and alleys, streets avenues—north, east, south, and west. Yet here they all unite. Tell me, does the magnetic virtue of the needles of the compasses of all those ships attract them thither?”

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The answer to that last question, it seems, is Yup!

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I’m intrigued by this power cat .  .  .  the timing vessel.  Is its work called telemetry?  Anyone tell me more about what instrumentation it contains?   I’m wondering if this will be the official timer for the larger boat race next year in Bermuda.

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I’m posting these photos earlier than usual today in hopes that they may prompt anyone who missed the race yesterday to brave the weather and watch today.

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I’ll post some more tomorrow.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to Gerard Thornton for this platform.   Click here (and scroll) for a photo of Eric R. Thornton.

 

This is a singular image, a 1969 tugboat in a century-and-a-half-old graving dock in Brooklyn.  Some of you maybe saw it on FB, but not everybody wades in FB waters.  What makes this photo so powerful to me is such a combination of composition, subject matter, and light that different people will look at this and see not all the same things.  Some might see beauty, and others defeat . . . or power, or fatigue, expense, challenge . . . .  It strikes me as not unlike this Mark Twain passage on conflicting ways of seeing a river.  And I’ll stop myself here.

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Click here for a favorite I took of the 1969 YTB-803 Nanticoke, now Robert E. McAllister.

Thanks again to Donald Edwards for permission to use this exquisite photo.

And while we’re on a Mark Twain morning, at the end of this post is a clue to my summer/fall employment.

With a tip of the hat  to Hildegarde Swift and Lynd Ward, the title that came to mind as I shot these, and you’ll see why by the end.  See the road signs up there intended for drivers on the Triboro Bridge?

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Rewarding my wait, it’s Jaguar towing Highlander Sea into the Gate,

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past the Ward’s Island Footbridge, and

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past Archibald Gracie’s cottage on the point. Click here for peers of the 1978 Jaguar.

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Westbound the tow came at almost slack water and past

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RTC 104 and

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the Twins bound for Riverhead.

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More on the brick building there with romanesque windows and green roof at the end of this post.

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And here, when they were under the Queensboro Bridge,  the title occurred to me . . . having the same syllabication and cadence as the Swift and Ward title.

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Now we need a story, one that starts as hundreds could in tiny but huge Essex.  Click here for my previous posts on Essex.

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Maybe one about a fishing schooner design turned pilot boat turned yacht turned school turned . . .

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fish market and restaurant/bar in the sixth boro.  I hope they sell monkfish.  These photos are compliments of my brother taken in Zwolle at a

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pop-up market.

Thanks bro . . .

All other photos here by Will Van Dorp.

So, thanks to identification by Jonathan Steinman, the brick building there is ConEd’s cogeneration plant at East  74th St.  And this is a digression, but 74th Street has long been quite the interesting place.

As a review, here and here were the posts I did on Wavertree going TO Caddell 11 months ago, and here is the series 1 through 4 focusing on Wavertree AT Caddell’s.

Below was she on March 10.  While I was away, she was refloated.

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Below is March 19.  To my surprise, the masts had been unstepped.

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And below was yesterday, April 17, the day when Executive Director of South Street Seaport Museum, Jonathan Boulware,  conducted a tour of the work in progress.  Any errors in this reportage are due to my having forgotten my pen and pad.

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Since the masts–at up to 20 tons each, if I heard that right–were unstepped, their cleanup and refurbishment has begun.

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A house has been built over the whaleback stern to protect the interior spaces.  There is some beautiful birdseye maple panelling in there.

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The underside of the whaleback shows the details of work already completed.

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This is the interior of the upper stern, looking to starboard.

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Access to the cargo areas during the tour was forward.

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I’m eager to see what work gets done to the bowsprit. Check out this post (and scroll) from many years ago when Frank Hanavan and I put fresh paint on that bowsprit.

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This is a new deck . . . the tweendeck.  If you’ve ever eaten on Moshulu in Philadelphia, the restaurant is in this space.

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Wavertree had a tweendeck back in 1895, when she called briefly in the sixth boro, which you can read about here (scroll).  In the photo below, you are looking through a hatch in the tweendeck down into the main cargo hold.

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And here is the main payload space, the cathedral of cargo, looking toward the stern.  On a modern vessel, this would be divided into watertight compartments.

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I can’t say this is the manufacturer, but this is the concept–as I understand it–for this ballast.

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Mainmast will be restepped here.

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Here Jonathan explains the spar work.

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When the project is completed, all these spars will be aloft and potentially functional.

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This cross section of a spar shows the lamination of the wood.  Some of these products are provided–I believe–by Unalam.

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Here are some of the finer spars, along

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with the directions for re-assembly.

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Work going on in the rigging shed included stripping  off the old coatings and recovering the high quality old wire of the standing rigging.

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Worming, parcelling, and serving protects the wire and produces such sweet smells of pine tar.

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Many thanks to South Street Seaport Museum for offering this work progress tour.   Any errors here are unintentional and mine.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks anyone who hasn’t read A Dream of Tall Ships by the late great Peter Stanford would really enjoy the saga of Wavertree‘s arrival in the sixth boro as told in that book.

Navigator . . . until I looked carefully, I assumed she operated out of the Chesapeake/Elizabeth River in Virginia, because her colors are similar to tugs like Kodiak.   But I stand corrected . . . Balisco Marine Services . . . I had not known that name.

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And Realist, the nearer tug, I thought she was always at the dock, as here, tied in front of Hubert Bays.

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Well, yesterday, Realist crossed the Upper Bay when I was there, and she needed the upper wheelhouse to see over GL66.

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Below is a photo of Realist, taken not quite a year ago.  In this batch of photos here from Paul Strubeck, you’ll find a photo of Realist fleet mate Specialist.

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Here’s Dolphin, which I last saw in the Mississippi here almost a year and a half ago.

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Yesterday the 70 degree air temperatures made the Upper Bay quite foggy, a nice effect.

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And finally . . . Genesis Liberty, you can see her here in some of her previous lives– Hornbeck and before– in this post from eight years ago!!

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Eight years ago, the skyline didn’t look this way either.

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For more older photos of two of the tugs in today’s post, click here, a post from three years ago.

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All the photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Here were the previous 28.

I hope what this is becomes apparent through the series.

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I guess by now the question should be wherezit?

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Answer is tomorrow . . .  Many thanks to the crew, who knows who they are.

All photos this weekend by Will Van Dorp.

 

I don’t actually go looking for parallel posts;  maybe it’s just that my brain thinks and eyes see in similar ways from one year to the next in March, but here and here are posts from exactly four years ago.

Although this blog focuses on work boats, I’ll comment on backgrounds today.  What’s on the water is fluid, but all the constant transformations on the landsides here are more permanent and yet constantly evolving.  Baseline might have been 500 years ago, but even by then it had evolved.  The cruise ship here is docked at what today is called Cape Liberty Cruise Port;  thirty years ago it was MOTBY.

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Frances waits at a barge anchorage near Anthem of the Seas

Over on the nearest shore, left half of the photo is evidence of work where next year an attraction called New York Wheel will spin.  I know we’re way past name discussions now, but I’m still for alternatives like Ferries Wheel or NY Wheeler Dealer . . . .  And with the reference to “pods,” I’m thinking of a series of sci-fi movies . . .

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Eastern Welder fishes as New Jersey Responder exits the KVK.

The uneven, brown land just off the starboard bow of USNS Red Cloud is part of the Bayonne Golf Club, below the surface of which is a capped landfill.

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Discovery Coast passes in front of Red Cloud.

Off to the left, you see current status of the Bayonne side of the bridge named for the same town.

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From l. to r., there’s Chandra B, Celsius Manila, New Jersey Responder, and (I think) Robert E. McAllister.

Looking from behind the construction site for the Wheel, some miles to NE are part of the Statue of Liberty and  the iconic 1931 Empire State Building.

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Anacostia (2009)  and Tangier Island (2014)  look a lot alike, but the older boat has 1200 more horsepower.

Note the double deck traffic on the VZ Bridge.

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l. to r. it’s Caroline Oldendorff and Australian Spirit.

This is looking from the middle of Upper Bay across Red Hook to downtown Brooklyn.

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In front of the busy background, it’s Alice Oldendorff, Rossini, and Robert E. McAllister.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

All photos today come thanks to John Huntington.  Check out his new site here, one which I mentioned a week and a half ago here.

Here are the basics on what you are looking at, mostly from John’s caption:  “FAR ROCKAWAY, QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY, NY/USA – FEBRUARY 25, 2016: The 24 meter (78 foot) scallop fishing vessel the Carolina Queen III, rests in surf in the Atlantic Ocean off Far Rockaway on the Rockaway peninsula of the borough of Queens in New York City. The boat ran aground at about 2am and all the crew were safely evacuated by the US Coast Guard.”   Of course, there are also the related stories about the USCG 25′ RIB attempting a rescue and capsizing in the 10-12′ seas, and its crew, trained and geared up for such a possibility, safely swimming to shore;  and the rescue of Carolina Queen III crew by helicopter.  Photos here.  A number of the RIBs can be seen here.

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Salvage plans are underway.  The fishing vessel–to my untrained eye–seems to have held up well, a tribute to its builders as well as to the fact of coming ashore on the sand.  Those builders are responsible for two of the newest tugboats in the sixth boro as well.

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I’m sure the owners and crew of the vessel feel sick right now.

FAR ROCKAWAY, QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY, NY/USA – FEBRUARY 25, 2016: The 24 meter (78 foot) scallop fishing vessel the Carolina Queen III, rests in heavy surf in the Atlantic ocean off Far Rockaway on the Rockaway peninsula of the borough of Queens in New York City. The boat ran aground at about 2am and all the crew were safely evacuated by the US Coast Guard.

 

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But looking at John’s remarkable photos, I’m struck by their allure.  The calm water, patches of blue sky, reflection of a beautiful machine misplaced on soft sand  . . .  contrast sharply with how the scene must have appeared to the crews Wednesday night when the wind and spray made the decks feel like hell, a time of uncertainty and fear.

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I’ve previously done a set of posts on a vessel ashore here.  And from South Africa four years ago, these photos from Colin Syndercombe and another fishing boat astrand.

Thanks again to John Huntington for use of these photos.

For a photo of Rodriguez Boatbuilders’ 2015 James E. Brown, click here and scroll.

For a sense of how shipwreck has attracted photographers of four generations of a British family, click here.

 

Here are previous posts in this series.

These photos come thanks to Jonathan Steinman, who keeps vigil on the East River.  Here, he reports from a week ago, “construction of Rockefeller University’s River Campus continues apace … see Susan Miller guiding a barge and crane into position.”

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While the day passes, Paul Andrew (?) comes by with a recycling barge, I believe.  Here’s an interesting article by David Gelles on the effect tumbled oil prices have had on the recycling business.

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And that’s Kimberly Poling . . . but has her color scheme changed back slightly?  Or just snow in my eyes?

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And on a day when the sixth boro is seeing single digit temperatures, I know it’s inhuman to post these next two photos.  I took them about three weeks ago in this location, where I started my sailing project. Any guesses?

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Here’s a shot I took about a mile south of the previous photo.

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Answer tomorrow.   Meanwhile, if you need warming up, here’s my tribute to today . . . .

Thanks to Jonathan for the first three photos; Will Van Dorp took the last two.

 

 

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Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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