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This is the third of three digressions before getting on with the account of my trip west.

The saga of SS Binghamton started in 1904,

and I last saw it from land on January 6, 2017, when demolition was said to have started.  Demolition had started but defined as “asbestos abatement” by the alien looking figures clustered near the tender and the stack.

As a relative newcomer in the sixth boro, I first set foot on the ferry in 2011, when some thought a chance still existed to save her or parts of her.  I’ve also been holding off doing this post in hopes that more photos of the demolition process would surface.  I hope I can still do another post if such photos emerge.  I would have been there, but I was on my trip west.

The next two photos I took on July 16 from the water, the last it turns out.

 

Paul Strubeck took the photo below as he passed by about 10 days later when the stack had just been removed . . . as in a decapitation.

Only a few days later, Glenn Raymo took the next two shots from the Walkway over the Hudson, rubble going up the river.

 

Here’s a TV commercial once intended to attract patrons to the now gone restaurant.

Thanks to Paul and Glenn, more of whose work is available here.

 

 

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The flight back home through LaGuardia the other day chilled with its turbulence but thrilled with scenery.  I used my phone rather than camera to avoid hitting the window with the lens.

Here we enter  NYC airspace over Raritan Bay.  Imagine this on a clock face at the 0800 and heading clockwise. The land is the SW corner of Staten Island.  That’s Outerbridge Crossing over the Arthur Kill (AK), and the cargo vessel following the ever-so-strange channel is SCT Matterhorn, all 538′ of her outbound.

Here we look at the creeks in Freshkills Park, Isle of Meadows, and then Carteret NJ on the other side of the AK;  just off the left side of the photo is the location of the marine scrapyard featured in my documentary, Graves of Arthur Kill

A few seconds later, our Embraer 190 crosses the KVK;  dead center is the Bayonne Bridge and Shooters Island at the confluence of Newark Bay (to the north, or right on this photo) and the Kills . . . Arthur and Kill Van.  We’re now at about 0900 on our clock face.

Here’s my favorite shot of the series . . . the entire length of the curvy KVK.  Exiting the Kills and bound for sea past the Staten Island Yankees stadium is the 751′ Hoegh Asia.   I’ve no idea who’s on first.   The salt pile and the IMTT tank farm are key landmarks.

Below are the twin peninsulas of MOTBY, with Bayonne Drydock and the Bayonne Cruise terminal directly across that peninsula.  In the lower rightmost patch of green on this peninsula you can locate the statue dedicated by Putin . . . yes, THAT Putin.    The peninsula to the right–the Global terminals Bayonne— accommodates container ships and ROROs. In the distance Newark Bay Bridge and the rail bridge to its right cross Newark Bay.

Slightly farther north, you can see Global terminals, the Weeks Marine yard, the Greenville rail docks serving NYNJ Rail, and Sims scrap yard in Jersey City, where an unidentified bunker loads.

Approaching 1000 on my clock, here’s the confluence of the Hackensack (nearer) and Passaic Rivers, forming the SE point of Kearny NJ where they become the north end of Newark Bay.  Several hundred ships were built in the Kearny yard–this side of the point–in the first half of the 20th century. The Passaic disappears here into the tall buildings of Newark NJ.

Behold the meadowlands, and if you want to read a good book about that marsh, here’s a review of Robert Sullivan’s book, one of my all-time favorites.  Captains Bill or Hughie give fun tours there too.

So remember this flight is headed into LaGuardia from the NE, so that puts us at 1400 on our clock face, and that means we’re over New Rochelle this point in the approach pattern and that’s Hempstead Bay beyond Sands Point, with Execution Rocks Light looking like a submarine near leftish  center of photo.   The top of the photo looks SE across Nassau County.

It’s City Island, the most unlikely part of the Bronx, to which it’s connected by the City Island Bridge.

And just before landing . . .  it’s Throgs Neck …  and a few seconds later, touch down.

All I can add is that I was glad for a portside window seat on the Embraer.  All that water, that’s what I call the sixth boro.  More Jetster soon . . . .

 

I think of ROROs like Dignity Ace as being fairly large, but this juxtaposition made me re-evaluate.

So let’s let the tape tell its tale:  three vessels here are (l to r) Anthem of the Seas, YM Utmost, and Dignity Ace with respect to their length and breadth; and I realize that the photo does nothing to show loa.  It comes out as 1141′ x 162′  v.  1099′ x 140′ v.  656′ x 106.’

The two Vane tugs are 90′ x 32,’  although I know it’s Fort McHenry alongside Anthem and cannot identify the tug alongside Dignity.

I’m guessing the fishing boat anchored here is about 20′ and

Franklin Reinauer is 81′ x 27.9 . . . .

And since we’re doing numbers . . . from the “globe” atop the “sky arm” to the water . . . that’s 300.’

That puts some perspective on scale of some sixth boro traffic.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous installments focusing on background.

Sometimes the partial reveal and the juxtaposition highlight what’s on the shorelines, like those triple deckers in Bayonne that would blend in perfectly in many 19th century mill towns.

Or the hugely forgotten Singer plant in Elizabeth, hugely forgotten by most residents of Elizabeth, that is.  Imagine, if someone could turn the clock back on that one, 10,000 people would have manufacturing jobs . . . either sewing machines, or

weaponry of all sorts.

 

But one detail on the bank over by the NJ-side of the Bridge caught my attention.  So I thought these beams would be trucked from the disappearing bridge to a scrapping yard.  How surprised I was when the crane lifted the beam off the truck not 1000 feet from where they’d been on duty for decades and

lowered them

one after the other

to what might be a series of trucks below.  I can’t quite see what becomes of the beams on the ground at Bergen Point.  And I think that’s the Passaic small boat.  ??

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Keep your eyes open and stay safe.

I’ve done posts with titles like 15 minutes or 18 . . . but here’s a set shot in just three minutes, just after that strange cloud–comet’s tail?–passed the day the temps went up to 65 midday for a few hours, setting a NYC record for that day.

Here’s Jonathan C from head-on, with Shooters Island off the stern.

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Zooming out shows Pegasus and Kimberly Poling using Edwin A. Poling, and the cranes at Howland Hook.

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It looks like some refinishing is happening on Pegasus.

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Mary H pushes Patriot heading the other direction.

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That church in a lot of photos is Immaculate Heart in Elizabeth NJ.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous weather posts, and although today the sixth boro and surrounding land masses are experiencing the first serious snowfall this season, this post is not about that.  Rather, it’s about something I saw and felt yesterday, when it was 65 degrees F for a few midday hours.  65!!

So here was the weather phenomenon photo taken at 0834.  I take it that’s a squall line, but it seemed so isolated.

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Here was the scene at 0826.  CMA CGM Amber headed into Port Elizabeth with JRT on the stern quarter.  Tomorrow I’ll have more Moran photos.  Notice how clear and calm it was right at the bridge, although Elizabethport seems enveloped in some mist.

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0827 . . . shows HMS Justice in that mist.

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So here I repeat the 0834 photo of that line moving rapidly in my direction.

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Here’s 0840 and

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below,  0841, as Jonathan C escorted CMA CGM Georgia around Bergen Point to Port Eliz.  Notice the dull finish on the Bayonne Bridge, since that squall line has obscured the morning sun at my back.  The temperature also dropped noticeably.

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At 0846, besides Jonathan C, we can now see (l to r) Jennifer Turecamo with barge Portland, James D., and Miriam.

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By 0922 my back was nicely warmed by the sun again, with the temperatures heading to a blue sky 65 in February, although Elizabeth seemed still misted in.

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All photos taken on February 8 by Will Van Dorp.  Did anyone else see and feel this front move through?

 

I’m doing a short post today, but it may be big in questions.  First of all, Goat Locker?  It’s a name rich in tradition.  Click here and make sure to read the reference by Mark D. Faram.

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So, 1200 hp on the stern of large RIB .  .  . That’s impressive.

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And then there’s this, the ONLY boat in North Cove.  Here’s what the website says it’s for.  Read what it says here about the use of this 25′ SAFE, i.e.,  “Plan B maintains your Military RHIB boat and keeps it fueled, maintained and ready to go. Then, in the event evacuation is required, you simply proceed to your boat’s Westside location.”  Wow . . . James Bond?

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Some six hundred miles farther south in Southport, NC . . . No Wake dwells in a wholly different climate.  It’s a nice boat, although I know nothing about it.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous posts in this series go back almost seven years.

 

Thanks to all of you who send me photos.  M & M McMorrow sent this photo taken at Atlantic Highlands just before Christmas.  And yes,

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Delta is the best Christmas red. I can’t seem to find a tugboat in the NMFS.NOAA registry called just “Delta.”   Someone help out?

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Richie Ryden took these photos just before New Year’s, sending them along with the note “I took these pic’s on 12/28/16 on the Hackensack River between Rt 3 east & west Bridges , It looks like they a are rebuilding the marina there !!! I saw Reliable from Coastline Marine Towing out of Belford NJ  switching barges empty for a full one with old pilings on it ! look at your blog all the time keep up the good work !!!! Happy New Year !!!!”

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Happy New Year, Richie!  And I have to admit I can find nothing about previous owners of Reliable also, although the late great John Skelson had a photo of her from a while back sans the upper house here.  Richie’s photos also helped solidify my image of what this vessel looks like compared with another Reliable that languishes up on the Oswego Canal. 

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Jed sent me this photo just after the start of 2017 with the note “Happy New Year from Maryland.  Here is your first tug of 2017, the ten-year-old Belgian Union Grizzly that I saw on the Scheldt in 2012.”   Thx Jed.  And since that time, she’s sent a half dozen more photos of European tugboats, which I’ll post soon.

photo date 6 SEPT 2012

And Tyler Jones must be losing his patience:  he sent me this photo back on November 1, and I still have not put it up.  What I love about this photo, Tyler, is the fog giving the impression that Coral Coast pushing a cement barge upriver at Poughkeepsie  is weightless, floating lazily on the clouds.  Thx much, Tyler.

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Jan van der Doe periodically sends me photos from Canadian Lake Ontario ports.  He didn’t identify this boat although I’m wondering if it’s Lac Manitoba, which capsized on the Ottawa River back in June 2015.

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In Hamilton harbor, here’s (l to r) Florence M, Tony Mackay, and James A. Hannah.   Hannah is a sister of Bloxom, the cover model for my documentary about the Arthur Kill graveyard and the most intact tugboat in the graveyard on the Arthur Kill.

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And finally, on December 12, here are more McKeil boats tied up in Hamilton.

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Thanks much M & M, Richie, Jed, Tyler, and Jan.

 

 

I blame my dear friend Christina Sun for this post.  Well, “blame” is the wrong word, but I’ll use it. She started it many years ago with this post on her blog, a project which I believe is “under re-powering and life extension,” to borrow someone else’s phrasing, and needs some encouragement, although she’ll blame me now for speaking that.

I’m impressed by murals, official and otherwise.  Mayor Steven Fulop in Jersey City  has promoted this public art in the city on the west side of the sixth bor.  Enjoy these.

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I like the wave here, but even more, love that copper sheath on the cylindrical corner to the lower right.  It reminds me of a firecracker, or old-fashioned “rocket of the future.”

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Near FIT in Manhattan, folks were painting

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these as I passed.

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Here are some on 9th Street in Brooklyn in the block directly south of the Gowanus Canal.

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Back in Manhattan, here’s one seen from both ends on the west side of the Maritime Hotel, a once-maritime related building that was left as on the high tide mark when the port receded and left Manhattan.

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Upriver in Troy and under the Green Island Bridge, it’s Troybot, who in the third panel of four

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appears to be saving a sinking passenger vessel.

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Also in Troy and under the Route 7 Bridge, someone summoned the spirits of some exotic sirens.

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This is a unique form of tagging, drawing on the algae-covered walls of a lock chamber as it drains.

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Oswego invites its high school students in.

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That Great Lakes city also has this mural about an event in another Great Lakes city that inspired this quite profound hymn.

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Here’s a mural visible from the Cuyahoga and under a bridge in Cleveland.

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Ann Arbor’s Huron River has never known these faunas, but someone still imagined them.

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But it was in Montreal this fall that I saw the best murals, as on this wall, with a variety of influences.

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This one commemorates an actress from the Beijing opera. Click here for the back story and the artists.

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Here are some in Beacon NY a few years ago.

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And this brings me back to Staten Island, and Lina Montoya’s projects, these over along the tin sheets screening off Caddell’s.

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Philadelphia is where I first encountered the result of the city organizing a murals program. See some here.  I’ve heard about the Oakland project, but I’ve never been there.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, whose point here is that he takes photos of other things while focusing boat to boat.

 

Yesterday’s post showed the 1923 SS California, which was launched with three funnels until it the two dummies were removed.

The SS California below was launched in 1928 to operate as a vessel in the Panama Pacific division of the American Line Steamship Company, as shown below.  But a decade later, it was sold to the United States Maritime Commission, which modified it extensively to comply with new fireproofing requirements post-Morro Castle fire.   They also removed one of the funnels and renamed the vessel SS Uraguay.  Click here to see the two superstructures on the hull side by side.

Mr. Gmelin caught it here passing the Jersey-side Holland Tunnel vent.  Anyone have guesses on the two ferries shown?

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