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I could not make the Sunday heats, so here are two more of my photos of the British entry showing how these boats perform . . .

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above the surface with most of the hull.  Approaching shore requires caution . . . but thanks to Frank Hanavan, here is a set of photos showing what happened along the Jersey shoreside, Morris Canalside . . . on Sunday.  The New York race over,

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one by one the boats were hooked and

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lifted above and beyond the watery confines,

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lowered carefully for a landing

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in the parking lot at Liberty Landing Marina, and

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disassembled,

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prepped for the road, and

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loaded into the containers that will likely travel beyond the sixth boro along I-80 and I-90 into Chicago for events starting June 10.  

For these bright Sunday photos, many thanks to Frank Hanavan, whose website here shows what he spends most of his time engaged in.

More photos from the event soon.

. ..  make that boats and ships.  Thanks to Allen Baker for sending along this set of T-AKR 294 Antares moving out of GMD back in January 2010.  Yup, some drafts get caught in an eddy and they spin round and round never getting posted.  But I’m a believer that late is better than never.

Antares is a Fast Sealift vessel.  Other Fast Sealift ships can be found here.

Charles D and Ellen McAllister assist her stern first out and

spin her around to head for sea.

Recent other government boats include this NJ State Police launch and

this one I’ve never seen before.  (Or since, unless it’s been repainted)

One more, here’s  300 of the New York Naval Militia.

First three fotos come thanks to Allen Baker, from early 2010.  Others are mine.

Here and here are the predecessors to this title.

So what’s this?

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Let’s zoom

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out.

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The photo above shows the stalk as I saw it Sunday, and the photo below shows the lifting gear near its base.  Let’s hope this means it’ll be making current with April breezes or before.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’ve a friend in the NJ town who pronounces her place of residence as if it started “H O B U . . . .”  The NJ city has a population density of 39,2012 people per square mile.  Many of them came down to the water in July 2014 for the City of Water Day, when I took these photos.

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Anyone know the vintage of this small yard tug?

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Many notable people are associated with Hoboken, but my association is with my parents, who both first set foot in the USA in Hoboken on the Holland-America pier, now long gone.

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As weird fate would have it, they traveled immediately to North Carolina, where their sponsor lived, which –as the seagulls fly–is about 30 miles from Hobucken, NC, where this USCG station is located.

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I don’t know if my parents ever visited Hobucken.  There’s the fish fleet just past the Route 304 bridge.

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I’d love to stop by the town someday soon.

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By the way, it has a population density of 25 people per square mile.

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Two Boys intrigued me, a 1966 44′ retired USCG boat.

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Anyone know if there’s a connection between the two place names?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Sorry if I confused a few of you with the acronym GHP&W.  You see how it expands above.  I suppose this is a sixth boro gunkhole of an upscale sort, and I’ll let you guess where at first.  And given the date today, my misleading clue is “turkey sailboat.”

I’ll use relative cardinal directions:  looking north,

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west,

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east,

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back west,

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looking southwest,

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And five minutes later . . . looking west,

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west,

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and east.  That’s Brooklyn over on the far side.

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And  . . . while staying in the channels, you could get to a Manhattan dock in less than 20 minutes from our initial photo.

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Here’s a chart view and here’s

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more context.  See the two green diamonds at lower left of this image?  The lower of the two is Teal Bulker, which you saw above.   The blue diamond down there is a NYWaterways boat, just 17 minutes from Pier 11.  And just north of the complex is a beach that might hint at what sixth boro coastlines once were. 

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Oh, and that clue intended to distract, here it is, and it has nothing to do with Thanksgiving.

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On a personal note, I’d like to thank all of you for reading tugster and contributing in so many ways.  To everyone that I’ve crossed paths with in the past year and the foregone 2950+ posts, thank you.

Happy Thanksgiving today and every day.  Life is precious and unpredictable.

 

Let’s start at the sixth boro’s own Kearny Point.  Federal Ship Building & Dry Dock used to be there.  On December 1, 1943, a time when that place was turning out a vessel a week or so, hull #303 was delivered as USS Stern, DE-187.     After eight years as a USN vessel, she was transferred to the Netherlands as F-811, HNLMS Van Zijll, her identity until 1967 when she was returned to the US and scrapped.

John van der Doe, frequent contributor on this blog, sailed on F-811 around the world in 1954–55, as he says “employed with the US Naval Task-force Pacific fleet 4 or 6 (forgot the number) during the Korean war.”

Port Said, 1954, north entrance to the Suez Canal.  The large statue shows Ferdinand de Lesseps.  A few years later, the statue was dynamited as celebration of the nationalization of the Canal.

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Aden, stop for bunkers.

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Hong Kong, awaiting orders.

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Yokosuka, Japan, here and

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here.   That background landscape is still recognizable today.

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Papeete.

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Click here for some more of that era.

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Pacific side of the Panama Canal, now 1955.

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Original “mule” style.  Click here (and scroll) for photos of the mules from 2012.  I wonder what the next generation will be.

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And here’s a photo of the Kearny-built vessel taking on stores in Ponta Delgada, Azores.

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Later, Jan took this photo in then-Leningrad.  I believe that’s St. Isaac’s Cathedral.

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Many thanks to Jan for these photos from long ago and faraway.

The title is such a mouthful that I’ll soon reduce it to GHP&W. Although this blog began with photos and observations of mostly working vessels in the great harbor associated with New York City, the watery part of which I call the sixth boro, the blog followed a course suggested by these vessels to other GHP&Ws. And given then the global nature of water traffic, it seems logical to devote at least a month to other GHP&Ws.

I’ll kick off with this post about a port I’ll likely never visit, the former Aral Sea fishing port of Moynaq in Uzbekistan.  The photos come from Getty Images by Bjorn Holland and Kelly Cheng. Surprisingly maybe, I live in a neighborhood of NYC where Uzbek is the dominant language, which was part of my motivation to read a Tom Bissell book called Chasing the Sea:  Lost among the Ghosts of Empire in Central Asia.  I highly recommend it.

So here are some detail areas of a huge aerial photo print I saw the other day.  Can anyone point to detail that confirms a date?  My guess is somewhere in the 50s or 60s.   The first photo below shows the southeast point of Bayonne NJ.  The peninsula bisecting the top and bottom is MOTBY.  Governors Island is upper right and the Statue is upper left with the southern tip of Manhattan along the top.

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Below is a closer up of the lower right corner of the photo above, showing that tugboat, some barges, and two sets of  trucks  at the cement dock.

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Note the Statue and Ellis Island.  To the left of it is now Liberty State Park.  The Caven Point Pier crosses the center of the photo and the current Global Terminal is still waiting for fill.

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Below is the just capped landfill that is topped by the Bayonne Golf Club.   Lower left is quite the gunkhole with disintegrating watercraft I’d love to see a closeup of.

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Remember that all the B/W “photos” above are parts of the same aerial shot.

Let’s have a fun month with lots of GHP&Ws.  And not to be too prescriptive, I’d love photos from a variety of GHP&Ws in Asia and Africa, mostly lacking in my previous 2900+ posts.  Of course, here and here are a few posts I’ve done on African ports; here,  Asian; and here and here, South American.

While I’m asking for collaboration, I have a chance to replicate a trip on a major African river that I originally did in 1973-74;  what I seek is leads to a publication that might be interested in the story and photos. The trip is pricey, and if I can sell a tale with photos, I can offset some of the expense. Anyone have ideas or connections?

Up, up,

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and in.  All new builds follow the same arc, even though the details differ.  Check out the splash of Onrust here over a half decade back.  Here’s how the water came up to meet Pegasus back five years ago.

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To finish the dory, there’s a trip

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through the Kills and

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across Raritan Bay to get to Cheesequake Creek.  Pam writes, “Carl Baronowshi, owner of the yard was helpful in determining the rig. Traditionally it would have been a push the boom up alongside the mast and unstep the whole business and lay it in the boat. I wasn’t strong enough to list the mast out of the step without raising havoc if it got out of the step, John help me figure out a gooseneck and track arrangement so we could lower the sail in a less cumbersome manner.”

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Ibis is launched,

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boarded, and

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eager to what she was built for.

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More photos follow.

 

The last photo of yesterday’s post here showed a dory in the beginning stages of construction.  Its placement there conforms to Chekhov’s gun principle.  So here’s what follows.  Maybe I should call this post  . . .” in the shadow of an old building and protected by the body of a Chinese laundry truck,  Ibis hatches, fledges, and more . . .” but that would be rather long.   So just enjoy.

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Garboards in place,

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planks fastened and plugs driven . . .  About the clamps, Pam says “they are simple and brilliant. They have really long jaws to be able to reach across a plank to clamp the new plank to the one already in place. Wedges get tapped into the other end to tighten the grip.”

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Sheer strake in place,  and now

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it’s time to roll her over.

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“Dories are usually built on their frames which act as the mold stations – I would do it that way if I built another dory. We used the mold stations and steam bent frames to go into the boat. Steam bending is an experience, although hair-raising… handling a hot piece of wood, and maneuvering clamps quickly before wood cools… It is hugely satisfying though.”

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Ibis has a beautiful bow, soon to be cutting through sixth boro waters

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Again, many thanks to Pamela Hepburn for use of her photos and in some cases, her commentary.

 

 

 

Dave Boone has contributed photos here once before, and his painting are the focus of the second half of this post. In the same post with his paintings, Timothy McAllister appears.

So what’s this orb off the port side of battleship New Jersey, BB-62.  BB .  . as in basketball?

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And what’s that experimental gear on the after deck  of Timothy McAllister?

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And is that orb headed for a swish . . .

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while this crew in unusual garb watch from the Big J?

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Here’s the story and more pics.  It’s Globetrotter week in these parts, and winter and its icy grip . . . be gone . . . this looks like fun!

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Many thanks to Dave Boone for sharing these really spring-fever inducing photos!  See Dave’s work here.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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