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Up, up,

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and in.  All new builds follow the same arc, even though the details differ.  Check out the splash of Onrust here over a half decade back.  Here’s how the water came up to meet Pegasus back five years ago.

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To finish the dory, there’s a trip

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through the Kills and

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across Raritan Bay to get to Cheesequake Creek.  Pam writes, “Carl Baronowshi, owner of the yard was helpful in determining the rig. Traditionally it would have been a push the boom up alongside the mast and unstep the whole business and lay it in the boat. I wasn’t strong enough to list the mast out of the step without raising havoc if it got out of the step, John help me figure out a gooseneck and track arrangement so we could lower the sail in a less cumbersome manner.”

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Ibis is launched,

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boarded, and

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eager to what she was built for.

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More photos follow.

 

The last photo of yesterday’s post here showed a dory in the beginning stages of construction.  Its placement there conforms to Chekhov’s gun principle.  So here’s what follows.  Maybe I should call this post  . . .” in the shadow of an old building and protected by the body of a Chinese laundry truck,  Ibis hatches, fledges, and more . . .” but that would be rather long.   So just enjoy.

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Garboards in place,

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planks fastened and plugs driven . . .  About the clamps, Pam says “they are simple and brilliant. They have really long jaws to be able to reach across a plank to clamp the new plank to the one already in place. Wedges get tapped into the other end to tighten the grip.”

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Sheer strake in place,  and now

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it’s time to roll her over.

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“Dories are usually built on their frames which act as the mold stations – I would do it that way if I built another dory. We used the mold stations and steam bent frames to go into the boat. Steam bending is an experience, although hair-raising… handling a hot piece of wood, and maneuvering clamps quickly before wood cools… It is hugely satisfying though.”

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Ibis has a beautiful bow, soon to be cutting through sixth boro waters

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Again, many thanks to Pamela Hepburn for use of her photos and in some cases, her commentary.

 

 

 

Dave Boone has contributed photos here once before, and his painting are the focus of the second half of this post. In the same post with his paintings, Timothy McAllister appears.

So what’s this orb off the port side of battleship New Jersey, BB-62.  BB .  . as in basketball?

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And what’s that experimental gear on the after deck  of Timothy McAllister?

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And is that orb headed for a swish . . .

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while this crew in unusual garb watch from the Big J?

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Here’s the story and more pics.  It’s Globetrotter week in these parts, and winter and its icy grip . . . be gone . . . this looks like fun!

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Many thanks to Dave Boone for sharing these really spring-fever inducing photos!  See Dave’s work here.

There’s fog of war, and then there’s warships in fog.  Click here for another.

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Note the Hoboken tower off the bow in the photo above and off the stern . . . below.

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Click here for a link to the vessel L-810 Johan De Witt, and here for its namesake, a Dutch politician who was murdered by his opponents.

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That’s Ellen McAllister at the stern and Elizabeth alongside midships.

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I’m guessing there is a photographer in this vessel.

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See it there off the stern?

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All photo taken this morning by Will Van dorp, who has been back in the sixth boro for over a week now but is still mostly “unpacking” the canal experiences, which will be shared shortly.

 

Here was my post two years ago, and here are some photos I took on and around the first CoWD.     Peter Stanford, several decades back, organized an annual Sea Day, which I think is a better name.  Squint your eyes looking at the photo below and you almost imagine a planet of water.   Almost, right?

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I’m happy that summer and winter brings sightseers onto the water using these vessels.

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Squint again and from this perspective the boro of Manhattan looks a bit like the bow of a vessel, WTC1 being the stem post.  Fireboat Harvey and the rowboat are much near New Jersey, though, than the city of NYC.

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It’s the city of Hoboken water day?

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It’s actually the sixth boro water day . . . with land activities on boros, islands, and cities in a neighboring state.   Below, it’s Village Community Boathouse rowers past Pier A.

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Meanwhile, in the midst of it all, work goes on along the front of the inimitable Manhattan skyline, Sassafras here with DoubleSkin 39.

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And here as the day starts, the iconic Pegasus  . . . and crew  . . . reporting for duty, getting those who signed up for free tours on

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the primordial boro.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who leaves with his red passport tomorrow for the north country.  Posting will happen when possible.

 

What attracted my attention was the gull, shrieking with anger.  Click here (and follow) to see all the previous posts I’ve done about this once-proud ferry.

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“How could you allow this prolonged death?”  said the gull.

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And as much evidence as you may have that I’m fascinated by ruins, I’m with the gull on this one.

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It’s painful to watch this agony, especially as the sequence of links following from the first one above shows how spectacular this one once was.

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Get it over already.

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I’ve taken the following photos from the following books, which I own.  If you’re interested in the sixth boro past, you should own them too.

Thomas R. Flagg  . . . New York Harbor Railroads, vol 2

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Here was the interior before it was converted to a restaurant.

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And the engine room.

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Raymond J. Baxter and Arthur G. Adams . . . Railroad Ferries of the Hudson

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The two books I cite are certainly a worthwhile purchase for anyone who looks at today’s sixth boro watersides and imagines the past.

It’s now docked near land’s edge Weehawken.  It served almost 20 years in the Army before  spending almost the same number of years in the Navy although

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click here to see how differently she appeared and was oriented in the two services as YFU-79 and then IX-514.   Click here for more.

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At least 100,000 helicopter landings occurred here, 346 of which all landed on the same day in June 1988.

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I’m not sure what role she’ll play in the sixth boro.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s what self-dubbed “crazy dave” has to say about his time on Bay Lander.

. . . or citrus yellow . . .  there was a movie almost half a century ago that intrigued me as a teenager, and the phrase has stuck.  But this post is about those tanker that call in the sixth boro with orange juice.  Click here to learn more about the Brazilian orange juice industry.    It made my morning Tuesday to catch Orange Sun leaving, after nearly a week in Port Newark at a facility I’d love to visit.  And I do have something I’m curious about.

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Orange Sun came here from Santos, Brasil.  Right now it’s speeding to Tampa before –I think–heading back to Brasil.  Here‘s a couple months of itinerary.  My question . . . why would it stop at a port in our domestic orange state before traveling back to the Brasilian orange state?

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Please let me know if you have answers to the question or connections with the Port Newark juice facility.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Previous orange juice posts can be found below:

https://tugster.wordpress.com/2013/03/01/orange-juice/

https://tugster.wordpress.com/2009/12/02/southern-juice/

https://tugster.wordpress.com/2012/12/01/bebes-baaack/

https://tugster.wordpress.com/2012/02/07/bebe/

https://tugster.wordpress.com/2008/09/13/osj/

https://tugster.wordpress.com/2008/06/18/random-ships-4/

There are probably more.

What’s this?  Answer follows.

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Ice . .  we love it in some drinks.  but on rivers and roads, it’s a nuisance.  Ice breakers try to keep strategic waterways open, and on roadways, salt is the weapon, but when the storehouse floor looks like this and

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and this, then you pray for another replenishment.   By the way, the top photo looks down into this hold from the exterior.

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Geography and time are  impediments, but so are well-intentioned regulations, as explained in this article.  We’re still a month from the start of spring this year, and according to the article embedded in the previous sentence, the state of NJ–I don’t know the info for NYC or NY–has used 1.5 times the amount of salt used all last winter.

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Many thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt for all the photos in this post.

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These photos were taken on M/V Rhine last week.

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Currently the next vessel has arrived and  . . . more are in the offing.

Many thanks to Brian for these photos.

It’s high time for me to reread Kurlansky’s Salt.

I could have called this a “scale” post, but I wanted to keep the thread.  The next two fotos were taken over a hundred years ago;  I used them back in 1989 in a now out-of-print book called Incomplete Journeys.  It was about shipwrecks in or near the mouth of the Merrimack River in Massachusetts.  The fotos show not salt but sand being loaded onto a schooner.  The vessel would be run onto the “sand pile” bank at high tide, loaded, and then floated off the next high tide.

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These ships were called sand droghers there, although that usage doesn’t seem very widespread.   But I digress.

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Let’s return to Port Newark, United Challenger, and salt.

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61,000 tons of salt arrived on this ship.

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Two men in cranes emptied the ship in about five days.

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That involved an additional eight men driving trucks to the mountain.

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Time lapse photography might be fun.

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Notice the spiral staircase into the hold.  Also, this hatch is midships;  the bridge is quite a distance away.

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Double click to enlarge (most fotos) this foto and just to the left of the Newark Bay Bridge, you’ll see WTC1.

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This is taken from just forward of the first hatch, counting from the bow.

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This is the bridge view.

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This parting shot is from the starboard bridge wing.

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Safe driving on icy roads.

All fotos (except the first two, of course)  by Will Van Dorp.   Many thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt.

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