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I’m doing a short post today, but it may be big in questions.  First of all, Goat Locker?  It’s a name rich in tradition.  Click here and make sure to read the reference by Mark D. Faram.

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So, 1200 hp on the stern of large RIB .  .  . That’s impressive.

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And then there’s this, the ONLY boat in North Cove.  Here’s what the website says it’s for.  Read what it says here about the use of this 25′ SAFE, i.e.,  “Plan B maintains your Military RHIB boat and keeps it fueled, maintained and ready to go. Then, in the event evacuation is required, you simply proceed to your boat’s Westside location.”  Wow . . . James Bond?

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Some six hundred miles farther south in Southport, NC . . . No Wake dwells in a wholly different climate.  It’s a nice boat, although I know nothing about it.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous posts in this series go back almost seven years.

 

Thanks to all of you who send me photos.  M & M McMorrow sent this photo taken at Atlantic Highlands just before Christmas.  And yes,

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Delta is the best Christmas red. I can’t seem to find a tugboat in the NMFS.NOAA registry called just “Delta.”   Someone help out?

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Richie Ryden took these photos just before New Year’s, sending them along with the note “I took these pic’s on 12/28/16 on the Hackensack River between Rt 3 east & west Bridges , It looks like they a are rebuilding the marina there !!! I saw Reliable from Coastline Marine Towing out of Belford NJ  switching barges empty for a full one with old pilings on it ! look at your blog all the time keep up the good work !!!! Happy New Year !!!!”

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Happy New Year, Richie!  And I have to admit I can find nothing about previous owners of Reliable also, although the late great John Skelson had a photo of her from a while back sans the upper house here.  Richie’s photos also helped solidify my image of what this vessel looks like compared with another Reliable that languishes up on the Oswego Canal. 

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Jed sent me this photo just after the start of 2017 with the note “Happy New Year from Maryland.  Here is your first tug of 2017, the ten-year-old Belgian Union Grizzly that I saw on the Scheldt in 2012.”   Thx Jed.  And since that time, she’s sent a half dozen more photos of European tugboats, which I’ll post soon.

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And Tyler Jones must be losing his patience:  he sent me this photo back on November 1, and I still have not put it up.  What I love about this photo, Tyler, is the fog giving the impression that Coral Coast pushing a cement barge upriver at Poughkeepsie  is weightless, floating lazily on the clouds.  Thx much, Tyler.

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Jan van der Doe periodically sends me photos from Canadian Lake Ontario ports.  He didn’t identify this boat although I’m wondering if it’s Lac Manitoba, which capsized on the Ottawa River back in June 2015.

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In Hamilton harbor, here’s (l to r) Florence M, Tony Mackay, and James A. Hannah.   Hannah is a sister of Bloxom, the cover model for my documentary about the Arthur Kill graveyard and the most intact tugboat in the graveyard on the Arthur Kill.

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And finally, on December 12, here are more McKeil boats tied up in Hamilton.

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Thanks much M & M, Richie, Jed, Tyler, and Jan.

 

 

I blame my dear friend Christina Sun for this post.  Well, “blame” is the wrong word, but I’ll use it. She started it many years ago with this post on her blog, a project which I believe is “under re-powering and life extension,” to borrow someone else’s phrasing, and needs some encouragement, although she’ll blame me now for speaking that.

I’m impressed by murals, official and otherwise.  Mayor Steven Fulop in Jersey City  has promoted this public art in the city on the west side of the sixth bor.  Enjoy these.

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I like the wave here, but even more, love that copper sheath on the cylindrical corner to the lower right.  It reminds me of a firecracker, or old-fashioned “rocket of the future.”

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Near FIT in Manhattan, folks were painting

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these as I passed.

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Here are some on 9th Street in Brooklyn in the block directly south of the Gowanus Canal.

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Back in Manhattan, here’s one seen from both ends on the west side of the Maritime Hotel, a once-maritime related building that was left as on the high tide mark when the port receded and left Manhattan.

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Upriver in Troy and under the Green Island Bridge, it’s Troybot, who in the third panel of four

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appears to be saving a sinking passenger vessel.

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Also in Troy and under the Route 7 Bridge, someone summoned the spirits of some exotic sirens.

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This is a unique form of tagging, drawing on the algae-covered walls of a lock chamber as it drains.

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Oswego invites its high school students in.

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That Great Lakes city also has this mural about an event in another Great Lakes city that inspired this quite profound hymn.

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Here’s a mural visible from the Cuyahoga and under a bridge in Cleveland.

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Ann Arbor’s Huron River has never known these faunas, but someone still imagined them.

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But it was in Montreal this fall that I saw the best murals, as on this wall, with a variety of influences.

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This one commemorates an actress from the Beijing opera. Click here for the back story and the artists.

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Here are some in Beacon NY a few years ago.

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And this brings me back to Staten Island, and Lina Montoya’s projects, these over along the tin sheets screening off Caddell’s.

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Philadelphia is where I first encountered the result of the city organizing a murals program. See some here.  I’ve heard about the Oakland project, but I’ve never been there.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, whose point here is that he takes photos of other things while focusing boat to boat.

 

Yesterday’s post showed the 1923 SS California, which was launched with three funnels until it the two dummies were removed.

The SS California below was launched in 1928 to operate as a vessel in the Panama Pacific division of the American Line Steamship Company, as shown below.  But a decade later, it was sold to the United States Maritime Commission, which modified it extensively to comply with new fireproofing requirements post-Morro Castle fire.   They also removed one of the funnels and renamed the vessel SS Uraguay.  Click here to see the two superstructures on the hull side by side.

Mr. Gmelin caught it here passing the Jersey-side Holland Tunnel vent.  Anyone have guesses on the two ferries shown?

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Actually this first in this series started here.   The ship is SS California, launched in April  1923.  If you look at the top photo in the link in the previous sentence, you’ll see this SS California started with three funnels, although it’s likely that two of the three were dummies.  Extra “dummy” funnels were “style enhancements,” added for appearance.  Notice the Lipton Tea building along the water in Hoboken?  The photo was cropped as shown.  Anyone help identify the tugboat company?

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As I mentioned in the September post linked above, I bought an album of prints at an antique shop in Oswego NY on one of my stops there this summer.  We were spending extra time there to replace a prop dinged on an immovable uncharted underwater obstruction.   Thanks to William Lafferty, I’ve learned that Mr. Gmelin “was a Cranford, New Jersey, based amateur photographer and maritime historian. He was one of the earliest members of the Steamship Historical Society of America and an occasional contributor to its journal, Steamboat Bill [now called Power Ships]. He died in 2001 at the age of eighty-eight.”  Click here and scroll for a photo of Mr. Gmelin, whose full name including the first name spelling I used above was stamped on the back of most of the photos.

Click here for SHSA’s online gallery.

I could not make the Sunday heats, so here are two more of my photos of the British entry showing how these boats perform . . .

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above the surface with most of the hull.  Approaching shore requires caution . . . but thanks to Frank Hanavan, here is a set of photos showing what happened along the Jersey shoreside, Morris Canalside . . . on Sunday.  The New York race over,

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one by one the boats were hooked and

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lifted above and beyond the watery confines,

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lowered carefully for a landing

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in the parking lot at Liberty Landing Marina, and

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disassembled,

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prepped for the road, and

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loaded into the containers that will likely travel beyond the sixth boro along I-80 and I-90 into Chicago for events starting June 10.  

For these bright Sunday photos, many thanks to Frank Hanavan, whose website here shows what he spends most of his time engaged in.

More photos from the event soon.

. ..  make that boats and ships.  Thanks to Allen Baker for sending along this set of T-AKR 294 Antares moving out of GMD back in January 2010.  Yup, some drafts get caught in an eddy and they spin round and round never getting posted.  But I’m a believer that late is better than never.

Antares is a Fast Sealift vessel.  Other Fast Sealift ships can be found here.

Charles D and Ellen McAllister assist her stern first out and

spin her around to head for sea.

Recent other government boats include this NJ State Police launch and

this one I’ve never seen before.  (Or since, unless it’s been repainted)

One more, here’s  300 of the New York Naval Militia.

First three fotos come thanks to Allen Baker, from early 2010.  Others are mine.

Here and here are the predecessors to this title.

So what’s this?

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Let’s zoom

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out.

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The photo above shows the stalk as I saw it Sunday, and the photo below shows the lifting gear near its base.  Let’s hope this means it’ll be making current with April breezes or before.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’ve a friend in the NJ town who pronounces her place of residence as if it started “H O B U . . . .”  The NJ city has a population density of 39,2012 people per square mile.  Many of them came down to the water in July 2014 for the City of Water Day, when I took these photos.

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Anyone know the vintage of this small yard tug?

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Many notable people are associated with Hoboken, but my association is with my parents, who both first set foot in the USA in Hoboken on the Holland-America pier, now long gone.

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As weird fate would have it, they traveled immediately to North Carolina, where their sponsor lived, which –as the seagulls fly–is about 30 miles from Hobucken, NC, where this USCG station is located.

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I don’t know if my parents ever visited Hobucken.  There’s the fish fleet just past the Route 304 bridge.

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I’d love to stop by the town someday soon.

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By the way, it has a population density of 25 people per square mile.

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Two Boys intrigued me, a 1966 44′ retired USCG boat.

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Anyone know if there’s a connection between the two place names?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Sorry if I confused a few of you with the acronym GHP&W.  You see how it expands above.  I suppose this is a sixth boro gunkhole of an upscale sort, and I’ll let you guess where at first.  And given the date today, my misleading clue is “turkey sailboat.”

I’ll use relative cardinal directions:  looking north,

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west,

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east,

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back west,

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looking southwest,

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And five minutes later . . . looking west,

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west,

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and east.  That’s Brooklyn over on the far side.

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And  . . . while staying in the channels, you could get to a Manhattan dock in less than 20 minutes from our initial photo.

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Here’s a chart view and here’s

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more context.  See the two green diamonds at lower left of this image?  The lower of the two is Teal Bulker, which you saw above.   The blue diamond down there is a NYWaterways boat, just 17 minutes from Pier 11.  And just north of the complex is a beach that might hint at what sixth boro coastlines once were. 

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Oh, and that clue intended to distract, here it is, and it has nothing to do with Thanksgiving.

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On a personal note, I’d like to thank all of you for reading tugster and contributing in so many ways.  To everyone that I’ve crossed paths with in the past year and the foregone 2950+ posts, thank you.

Happy Thanksgiving today and every day.  Life is precious and unpredictable.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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