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Government Boats 14 was here, from over a year ago.  A subtitle here might be navy vessels future and army vessels present.  Like this vessel below, sent along by Rod Smith of Narragansett Bay Shipping, where you can savor more shots of the same vessel.  Can you identify it?  Does “FSF 1″ stand for “frighteningly sci-fi 1,” which this truly is?  More below.

Now onto army vessels.  Oxymoron?  Nope, Enjoy these two, contributed by Joe Herbert:  LT-2085 Anzio (US Army tug built in 1955) , and

a Nathaniel Greene class tug, LT-801.   More of the Nathaniel Greene class here.

For scale of the afterdeck, check out the size of the barbeque grille relative to the winch.

For a list said to be all Army vessels, click here.    More here.  For a close-up of LT-806 in Kuwait, click here.  More Army tug fotos here.

For a frighteningly sci-fi US ARMY vessel prototype built in Australia, click here.

Here’s a full-vessel shot of cement-gray FSF 1 aka Sea Fighter passing Fort Adams in Narragansett Bay.

Again, thanks to Joe (here are fotos he previously contributed) and Rod, whose Narragansett Bay Shipping blog –on my blogroll–chronicles the diverse traffic on that body of water;  check it out.

Any errors in the above info can be blamed on Will Van Dorp, aka tugster.

Thanks to Fairlane and Ben for pointing out an example of “you travel far away to find what you left behind”  :  shipbuilders in southern New England labored to create vessels like Cayo Largo (2008) , below and here (fotos 6 and 7).  In fact, Cayo Largo displays front-and-center on the Blount Boats Shipyard site here.

The same Blount workers built Isla Grande (1976)  and Cayo Norte (1995) , and if you want graphic evidence, look at this shot of Cross Sound’s  Caribbean Ferry (1972) that despite its name never left New England, I don’t think.  They built Isleno in 2004.  (third foto down) and La Princesa (2009) (fotos 2 and 3).

As you enjoy these “walk-around” shots of Isla Grande, some of you

might consider her applicability for short sea shipping on

the Hudson, if not elsewhere as well.

Other Blount boats already depicted on tugster include the following:

Twin Tube (1952)

Bergen Point and Vulcan III (ex-Bethtug I and Bethtug III, respectively.  1958)

Scotty Sky (1960)

Miss New Jersey (1991) and bunches of other Circle Line boats.

Mister T (2001)

Labrador Sea (2002)

I’m sure I’ve missed some Blount boats that I’ve seen.  The one I’d really like to know the disposition of . . . is Kasai (1960) and built for the rivers of the Congo, where I worked from 1973 until 1975.  Anyone know?  Here’s a story of a ferry disaster on the Kasai River just a few years back.

Unrelated:  I’ve looked high and low for fotos of Asso 22, the tugboat seized yesterday off Libya.  See story here, with fotos, of course, of politicians.

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Here’s a foto of a foto taken at Fort Wetherill.  I couldn’t make out the name of the vessel, but can you identify the objects on the dock in the foreground?  Answer follows.

Fort Wetherill serves as a great venue for shipwatching;  here’s another shot of Danalith bound for sea, and  

tailed by Northeast Pilot IV, which also

met Thalassa Desgagnes when she arrived.  Thalassa is an apt name for a vessel.

Here’s a close-up of Northeast Pilot IV, a product of Narragansett Bay’s own Gladding-Hearn.Here’s Northeast Pilot V, which I presume is

a newer boat.Also based in Newport is Tiger Shark,

WPB 87359, one of dozens in this 87′ class.

Hidden away here is the stern launch small boat.

Back to that first pic . . .  those are mines.

Does anyone know the name of that mine-laying vessel?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Last time I posted a foto of WLV-612, the year 2009 had just begun and she was docked in North Cove in Lower Manhattan.   Now she’s on the Newport waterfront;  I’ve no idea the identity of the huge  sloop at Nantucket‘s stern.

Narragansett Bay is a ria (never heard that word before today) Pell Bridge (below)  between Newport and Conanicut Island, and  Jamestown-Verrazano Bridge (who knew?)   between the Island and North Kingston

Lobsterboat Shamrock here passes Rose Island, between Newport and Jamestown.  Rose Island Light is a B & B.

Here’s a view of calm waters below the cliff that runs in front of the “cottages” of notables like the Vanderbilts and Astors of the Gilded Age.

Coastline Kidd moves one of the painting barges working on the Pell Bridge.  A year ago in the KVK I caught sibling Coastline Girls here.

Entering the Bay from the north around Castle Hill Light and accompanied by the pilotboat,  it’s

Thalassa Desgagnes, here passing Fort Wetherill.

Leaving the Bay and passing the same park, it’s 34-year-old general cargo vessel Danalith, here outbound for

the Republic of Cape Verde?

More Narragansett Bay soon.  Many thanks to Rod Smith (of NBS.com) and Birk Thomas (of tugboat information.com) for hospitality and info.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

No, I’m not switching over to other folks’ fotos, but I just read a story that I can’t pass up on.  I can’t wait until I find time to gallivant up to Eastport, Maine, for the next shipment of cows in CATS.  Eastport has suddenly called me, really loud.  Like MOO!  Pregnant Moo at that.  Let me explain.

Marcel took this foto of Artisgracht in IJmuiden, and put  it on Shipspotting.

During the second half of July 2010 Artisgracht transported 472 pregnant cows from Eastport, Maine, to Turkey.  All arrived safely thanks to “Comfort Animal Transport Suites,” aka CATS.   Pregnant Maine cattle have the additional distinction of being “bluetongue-free.” Further, thanks to a company called Sexing Technologies, 80% of the cows are guaranteed to be carrying females.   Read the story here.  Artisgracht is a particularly apt name for this vessel, since Artis is the common name of a zoo in Amsterdam, near a gracht (“canal”).

Excuse the brevity of the post, but I must get up to Eastport to see this.  I rest my case.  It also reminds me of some friends who worked for Livestock Air . . .  can’t make that up.

CATS . . . I’ve not located a description or foto of a CATS, but we can play with this a bit . . .  a lot . ..  til the  …. cows come home, in fact.

Imagine a shipping line offering to transport cars in DOGS (Dry Overseas Garaging Solutions).  Or local produce, brews, christmas trees, and milk products (SSS) coming down the Hudson on RABBITS ( Riverine Area Barged Box Initiatives for Transportation Sustainability).  Finally, oil on river TRUCKS (Transportation Remedation to Undo Congestion Kinks).

Unrelated to this post, but relevant to “Anatomy…,”  Kyran Clune from Michigan calls attention to “truckable tug” Nipigon, outa Toronto.  Click here and here.

Mystic, to quote Soundbounder, is “Disneyland for [proud] water rats” and  thrills even the dogs, at least water dogs.  Can you figure out what’s happening here?

Kingston II was launched in 1937 after being assembled by apprentice welders at Electric Boat.

 Amazon (an 1885 screw schooner) graces Mystic with her beauty until her lightning-charred electronics are repaired.  Just beyond her with the wildly raked masts is Amistad, also in for repairs.Amazon (83′ waterline x 15′ beam) embodies  long and lean.

Breck Marshall, a Crosby catboat, sails like a dream. 

Mina is a sweet “launchetta” from exactly a century ago.

Growler leaves early on Columbus Day. 

Be-puddinged garvey with dory and high-and-dry whaleship  Morgan.

And the dog question . . . John Paul (launched 1967, ex-Katrina, Nickie B, and U. T. 1) , moored for part of weekend, had a blueclaw on a piece of fendering designed to allow assisting of submarine.  Dog saw crab and became so curious it nearly tried walking on water. 

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  More on some of these vessels soon.

Pegasus, westbound across the Sound, is back in

the sixth boro as I write, having traversed the American Mediterranean.  She basked in attention

of thousands of

folks as well as dozens of  vessels who loved her visit.  Where?

Mystic!  More fotos tomorrow.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who–along with the entire  crew– needs some sleep.

To see a recap of the North River fireworks, click here, and for Queens/Bronx/East River fireworks foto’d by Mitch, click here.  In that foto, you can see three barges, each accompanied by a tug.  Anyone know which ones?   I mostly heard fireworks in what sounded like a north woods war, which must have chased all the fish into the deepest holes in the lakes.

On the way up, I sailed with Jeff Anzevino on Tide Rider and caught this view of NYS Marine Highway‘s  Margot‘s wake just after we had

circumnavigated this nameless

and peerless 1948 Chris Craft, which seemed to serve as waterside chase

crew for this hot air balloon, one of a half dozen launching from Poughkeepsie.

Later we headed to Portsmouth, where we talked to Bob Hassold (facing camera).  Interested in his 1966 tug (ex-Matinicus)?  It’s for sale.  See this article.  Bob runs a tugboat paraphernalia shop on the Portsmouth waterfront, where I found Thomas R. Flagg’s book New York Harbor Railroads in Color (a treasure for anyone interested in a “pre-truck intensive” when short-sea-shipping and cross-harbor shipping was the rule!) for less than Amazon’s price.    If you don’t know this book and are interested in the sixth boro, this IS a “must-read” book.  Tug Alley . . . it’s the most intense tug-oriented shop in the East . . . if not in the world–and I was not asked or paid to say that.

I love Portsmouth, up north in general . . . .  with its lights,

boats,

sights,

blue produce and brews,

planters painted in red-white-blue,

(actually these are Hudson River bottom feeders), and

the water.  Enjoy this gratuitous, top-feeder tugster-relaxing foto.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who continues gallivanting (from Puget Sound) soon.

And happy 234th . . .  read the sentiments here.

After a half year elapsed, the Piscataqua called me back.   But before I show you two posts of new shots of Portsmouth harbor, can anyone identify this wreck over in the Sommerville Basin in Jamaica Bay, Queens?  I don’t have an answer.

The Basin is located in the right side center of the chart between Far Rockaway and Silver Hole Marsh.  Click on the chart below to make it interactive.

Now to Portsmouth, left to right: Eugenia Moran and Carly A. Turecamo (both from 1966).

OK, I couldn’t resist:  an Auburn 866 Speedster just outside the Moran yard on Ceres Street.

As seen from the waterside, Mary M. Coppedge (1975) and then the two mentioned above.

Less than a mile away is the Portsmouth Navy Yard.  Here YTB 771 Keokuk.    Off Keokuk‘s stern is

YTL 602 Cocheco (1945). I cannot identify the quite modern tug facing Cocheco.

Anyone identify the type?

San Francisco has its Alcatraz, and in the Count of Monte Cristo, Marseille had its Chateau d’If.  Portsmouth has its Naval Prison, formidable and surrounded by vicious currents.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, now in major gallivant mode.   More Portsmouth tomorrow.

Three years ago I felt the Pow Wow was my headwaters, and it still floods my head and soul with freshness, but I have moved on, find centering in other waters now.  So I should call this post Merrimack watershed, but …  next time.

Also, notice a new tugster feature . . . flickr on the sidebar.  I’ve avoided overlap of fotos there and here.

Songfrog:  my invented term this trip.  They really do sing, so why not give them as much credit as we do birds?  For frog mating protocols, click here.  Notice all the pollen on the water surface.  Peepers:  songfrogs’ castrati accompaniment, longed for here.

Redwing blackbird:  if I had to choose one birdsong as soundtrack for my life, this would be it.  Know it?

Stunning beauty . . . the most beautiful flower on earth .  . . the watery part of earth, that is.

The elusive young beaver:  I spotted this one or its siblings again and again but got no closer than this.  They do share stealth with bigfoot.  For all you ever wanted to know about beaver life, check here.

Dragonflies:  a personal quest this trip.

A biologist of the anisoptera variety would spend an entire lifetime studying these ancient critters.  On the Pow Wow around midday, they come out by the millions.  Only if you’re curious about the mechanics of their mating should you read this unromantic detail here.

Young’uns and … dinner for the big’uns.

Elizabeth … when she’s fed up with the city.

And full frontal tugster . . . nothing about nudity here.  Said Elizabeth, “Why would you pose this way?”

“Because I can,” replied tugster.  Really, he’s something of a songfrog sometime.

The blog will have a lot of guest gallivant bloggers this week because next week, I will be locked away in the wilds of Brooklyn . . . training not detention.  Actually, one goal with tugster (the blog) is to turn it over to guest-bloggers periodically, to broaden the perspective.

Thanks for reading.  All fotos but the last one by Will Van Dorp.

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