You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘New England’ category.

I may need some correction here, but it appears Boothbay Harbor is an entity different than Boothbay, and there’s an East and West Boothbay as well.  It’s sort of like the Hamptons in NY and the Oranges in NJ, I suppose.  Anyhow, I saw the scene below in Boothbay harbor and I realized I’d located one of the things I was seeking.  So the connection is the gray/white/red pinky schooner at the end of the wharf:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It’s Ardelle in Boothbay.  I’d seen Ardelle before here in one of my favorite places . . . Essex, MA, home of Lettie G. Howard and many other boats.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The connection is that the person who built Ardelle and others would be–is–an excellent choice to work on  . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

the hauled out Ernestina.  Watch the short video at that link if you have a minute and a half to spare.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I was just a visitor, so I left the crew alone.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The quicker the work’s done, the quicker it gets

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

back here to its empty dock at the New Bedford State Pier.  But again, I digress.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A few miles to the east of Boothbay Harbor is East Boothbay, home of Washburn & Doughty, but also Hodgdon Yachts, who went from wooden fishing boats to world-class yachts like Asolare, below.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Monitor, below, is an aptly-named state-owned Department of Marine Resources vessel, passing here near Ram Island Light.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And here I really digress, but seeing isolated lighthouses like this reminds me of the stories I heard long ago of William H. Wincapaw, also known as Flying Santa.

All photos, digressions, and faux-pas by Will Van Dorp.

If you want to share photos of a gunkhole, harbor, port, or wharf before the end of this month, send me an email.  This was GHP&W 24.

Click here for many more posts I’ve done with some connection to the Boothbays.

And this–believe it or not–is Galilee.  Galilee, Rhode Island.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s a close up of Tradition.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Amelia Bucolo intrigues me because of what it’s towing to port.  I’ve no context to tell how common this is.  The builder, by the way, is Gladding-Hearn, 1966.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The rig is unlike any fishing rig I can recall seeing, too.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Is it a market boat?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

True American is fiberglass.  See the gloves atop the cabin?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

I stopped in Point Judith only to catch the ferry to Block Island, but I’ll definitely be back.

Here’s a similar port post from six years ago.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

I took these photos in early September.  That’s New Bedford on the far side of the Acushnet River;  I was standing on the Fairhaven side of the hurricane barrier.  Acushnet was also the whaleship name in Moby Dick.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Note the Portuguese name:  Sao Paulo, built 1977

A member of the crew looks homeward.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mary K, built 1990, and registered

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

in Woods Hole.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Megan Marie, built 1980, is registered in

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Montauk.  If you want to watch fish boats, the hurricane barrier is a good spot.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sao Jacinto, 1977, and registered n New Bedford. And following them out, it’s

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Jim Dandy, 1977,  of So. Dartmouth.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Direction, Westport, MA.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Michigan, Fairhaven, 1947.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Nicole Danielle, Atlantic City, NJ.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Whitewater, Marathon FL!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here are four vessels of the Eastern Fisheries fleet. 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There are two boats by this name in New Bedford, as is

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

true of this one.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The registration on the stern says “New Bedford.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The density of boats on the docks makes credible that this port is rated #1 in the US for catch value, and has been for the past decade and a half.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Check out Cape May NJ and Lowland, NC.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

All photos taken over a two-day period around the mouth of the Acushnet by Will Van Dorp.

Someone more informed than me could identify what fishery each of these vessels engages in.

GHP&W 3.   And I don’t mean the northern Staten Island area named for a developer with the first name George.

As the lobster might suggest, this St. George is in Maine, and named for the river which is named for the English explorer/captor of Squanto who visited this area in 1607.   I was confused the first time I arrived here because I was looking for Port Clyde and all the signs said was “St. George.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

But it turns out that within the town of St. George are villages like Tennants Harbor, Martinsville, and Port Clyde.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I hope to return to Port Clyde next year, in part because this is the mainland wharf for the Monhegan Boat Line.  Elizabeth Ann was preparing for the passenger run, but

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I didn’t get to see the “world-famous Laura B,” a repurposed 1943 Army T-boat, which after doing WW2 duty in the Pacific, ran lobsters from Maine to Boston and New York. Anyone know of old NYC sixth-boro photos of Laura B delivering Maine fruits of the sea to the city?   Laura B was working, delivering freight to Monhegan.  And these cargo nets filled with firewood await for the next cargo run.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A glance at a map or chart of the peninsulas of Maine is enough to explain the value of craft like Reliance and her sisters.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The work boats in the harbor represent only part of the “gear” needed to fish;  the rest is on paper.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Even on rainy days, I like looking at these boats.  Taking photos of paperwork  . . . never so much.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

From a short conversation of the wharf, I have the sense that the paperwork and regulations keep vessels like these in port many more days than they fish. And global water temperature trends make this an even harder way to earn a living.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who wants to get back up here soon.

 

Really random means just that . . . and here are previous posts in the series.

So–thanks to Harry Thompson– let’s start with this assemblage . . . barge Amy B, Evelyn assist on the far side, but prominent is the 1941 Bushey built Jared S–ex-Cheyenne II, Sally Carroll, and Martin J. Kehoe.

0aahtjse

The closest I ever got to Jared S was here . . . about a mile in from the mouth of the Genesee River in October 2014.  See the white buoy 20 feet off the bow of the decrepit Spirit of Rochester . . .  that marks the hazard created by the sinking of Jared S.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Also thanks to Harry, here’s a repost of Ocean Queen, cropped slightly tighter than I had two weeks ago . . . but check this link for the particulars.    In that link you learn that she sank after getting rammed near Hell Gate.  Well, thanks to

0aaaarsrt

Robert Silva, here are some photos of Ocean Queen after she was raised.

0aarrt2

You can see exactly where a bow struck her.   Thanks, Robert.

0aarrt3

I took the photo below last week in Boothbay, Maine, where I checked out the Tugboat Inn.  Of course, I needed to know the story, since the superstructure here looked authentic.  All the info I collected online and from the staff there said the boat was built in 1917–probably in New York–and worked all its life until 1973 in Maine waters as the tugboat Maine.  However, nowhere could I corroborate this.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Thanks to Dave Boone, I received the photos below and learned a different narrative that seems plausible if you carefully compare the photo above with the one below.  The Boothbay pub was once the Richard J. Moran, built at Gibbs Gas Engine in Jacksonville in 1920.  Actually, it was built in Greenport NY in 1917 as Socony 3.  Then it became Maine and still later Richard J. Moran became the name.    Thanks again to Dave Boone for the correction.

0aarrt5

But was Richard J.  scrapped in 1950, as these databases say, or did it get renamed Maine at that point and then get transformed into a pub in the early 1970s? To be continued.

0aarrt6

The rest of the photos in this post I took last week.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In Rockland on the hard, it’s the mid-1950s Kennebec, and she’s available.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Dimensions are 41.9′ x 12.4.’

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s the info, but she might be sold by now.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Thanks to Harry, Robert, and Dave for vintage photos.  All other photos by Will Van Dorp.

And if you’re interested in collaboration, I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.

Tis the season . . .  to keep your eyes and ears on the weather.  In 1938 . . . before hurricanes had names or we had satellites to track them thousands of miles off, a big one came ashore on Long Island, a once-a-century-or-longer storm.   Do you know this structure below?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s the ocean side view . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

and the inland side.  To the right and up the Acushnet River are the ports of

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

New Bedford and Fairhaven.  Click here for info and photos on the building of the barrier.

The benchmark storm for the sixth boro is Sandy, and an event this past weekend happened on a location wiped out by the storm, Rockaway Beach at 106th Street.  Click here for posts/photos from my friend Barbara that chronicle the before/after in that part of NYC.  Welcome to the first annual Poseidon parade.

0aaaarp1

 

0aaaarp2

and a temporary replacement for Whalemina, the glacial erratic rolled away by Sandy.

0aaaarp3

 

Of the 10 worst hurricanes of the 20th century (judged by impact on the US), almost all happened  in September.  Since that link leaves off Katrina (??), I add this one.

Thanks to Barbara Barnard for the Poseidon Parade photos;  the ones from the Achushnet are by Will Van Dorp, who will have photos from up the Acushnet soon.   Technically, this fits into my “other watersheds” series.

I spent altogether too little time in Friendship recently.  Gotta go back. Here are a few of the other photos I took there while getting a close-up of Gallant.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Tiny Barge Transport has cordwood going over to one of the islands in the Bay.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Now if you read this 2008 news article, you get a sense of Friendship.  ““Friendship is good enough for me,” he said. “I stuck my nose into about everything. Never made much money but I kept a-going.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As a way-out-towner, I can’t tell you much about these boats.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

But to be redundant, I’d love to come back.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Three years ago, Sally W came thru the sixth boro and I had the great pleasure of seeing this beautiful Lord Nelson Victory tug with owners Allan and Sally Seymour.  They’ve kept the vessel in Camden ME since then, and it was a joy to see them recently.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Camden harbor opens to Penobscot Bay, a universe unto itself. Many boats caught my attention, but none so much as Prophet.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Grace Bailey has to be the doyenne of the windjammer fleet.  Built in Patchogue NY in 1882, she transported as much food as she did building materials.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mary Day and Angelique are two more of this unique fleet.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Camden is also home to this floating laboratory of electronic . . . gizmos.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Abigail & Warren illustrates thehandiwork of John’s Bay Boat Company.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Enjoy more . . .  like Appledore, 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Galatea,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

and Timberwind.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

But the one that captured me . . . that day was Prophet.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Many thanks to Allan and Sally.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Back in September 2007, I was paying attention to the green Gladding-Hearn 1966 Dragon, when a schooner with tanbark sails entered my field of view, and what

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

a schooner she was.  I never got any nearer than to take the photo below. Twice, however, I got requests for copies of that photo.  Fulfilling the more recent request led to an invitation to see the boat, which had undergone a long restoration process, and sans masts was back in the water.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

So here she is, two weeks ago in Friendship Maine.  Drool . . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Click here for some specs.  Her name is Gallant and she’s actually only slightly older than Dragon and built less than 15 miles from GH, as the gull flies.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’m eager to see her masts stepped and sails bellied.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Many thanks to Don Zappone for the tour of this sweet schooner.

Click here for previous posts on SAILing cargo.  You may recall the vessel Ceres, which moved cargo from Vermont to NYC two years ago and which this summer suspended those efforts.

The sailing vessel below–credit to Stefan Edick– is the venerable schooner Adventure.  Built in 1926 in Essex MA, she doryfished for three decades before times forced several re-invention.  Recently, she got back into moving food, transporting $70,000 of Maine farm and sea bounty from Commercial Wharf  in Portland to Boston’s Long Wharf.

0aaaaadvt

Here she passes Spring Point Ledge Light, with Fort Gorges in the distance.  All the photos that follow are used with credit to Mark Hartman via Jessica Suda.

0aamsf1

0aamsf2

She’s prepared for the cargo and

0aaaamsf3

loaded.

0aaaamsf4

0aaaamsf5

Here’s Adventure arrived in Boston, where

0aaaabos1

Metro Pedal Power takes over to move the goods to market.

0aaaabos2

Click here for the Maine Sail Freight Flickr page.

 

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 842 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

February 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
29  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 842 other followers