You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Netherlands’ category.

Here are previous installments.

I caught Invictus earlier this week as it came into the boro.  I had no idea then that by midweek, it would become newsworthy, although it would be on Page Six.  Anyone know what I’m talking about?  Answer follows.

I don’t know if this is the Invictus owner driving the tender or wearing the red shirt topside in the photo above, but this tender followed the bigger vessel in.  Invictus is US built by Delta, although it’s not US-flagged.

Lady May IV, tied up over at Chelsea Piers is Dutch built. It’s smaller than Invictus and for sale for about one-third the price of Invictus.

If I’m correct about the larger of two yachts directly below the Empire State Building, that Utopia IV, Italian built. I have seen a Utopia II and III in the boro in previous years, although I’m not sure there’s a connection.

Contina has been here before;  it appears to be Brazil built by Inace yachts of Fortaleza.  I wonder why the CO painted on the bow previously is no longer there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, and here’s the story of Invictus, one that has to do with soccer champions, about half of whom come from California.  The rich and famous used to travel in style on ocean liners.

Again, notice the variety of shoreline backgrounds?

Related:  Here’s a conversion from commercial vessel to motor yacht Voyager I’d love to see when it’s complete.

 

I took these photos this morning in North Cove, the same place I took photos of a youthful Brigitte Bardot about six weeks ago here.

If you saw Brigitte Bardot, you’ve at least a sense of what this could be, but I’ll leave any identification in suspension until the end of the post.  I wish I’d seen this vessel coming in at the Narrows.

Port beam above and stern quarter view below.

And bow quarter.  I took these around 0800 because I had other places to be later.  It has a color scheme that’s almost like a geometric dazzle.

 

Ready for a clue?

See the chrome lettering lower left?  Damen.

Click here for photos and info on this vessel, Ad-Vantage, a Damen YS (yacht support) 5009, a 182′ vessel.  See it launch toys including a mini submarine here.   Ad-Vantage has been around since 2012.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s posted previously on vessels in North Cove here, here, here, and more.

Here are all the previous installments of this series.

Glenn Raymo caught this photo up the Hudson the other day, as Joker assisted a Weeks crane.  Hays tugs do come up here occasionally, but I’ve never seen them.

Back almost exactly six years ago, the same boat headed upriver as a dead ship.  And eight years ago, working for a different company and painted in a different livery, here she was . . .  2011, eastbound in the KVK.

Justin Zizes was coming down the Hudson recently and caught this spring-evoking photo of Nathan G, her gray livery and aggregate cargo set off by the hint of leaves on the tree-lined far shore.

Thanks to Justin also for this photo of Mister Jim in her homeport in Coeymans.

Jan van der Doe sent these photos along of a group of northern European tugs at work, taken in early April by Jan Oosterboer, not far from Rotterdam.

Mutratug 32 is a Carrousel Rave tug, which means she rotate her point of attachment to better brake the assisted vessel.  To see her in action, click here.

And finally, see the tugs in this photo I took on the East River the other day?  Two of them?

Thomas J. Brown is obvious and always a delight to see.  But then there’s Bosco on the barge.  I believe she was heading for a job on the Hutchinson River.

Thanks to Glenn, Justin, Jan, and Jan for photos here.

 

Here are some previous posts with photos from Jan.

So here’s the tugboat, just out of the shipyard near the Arctic Circle and at work, the last in a series of five identical anchor handling tug supply (AHTS) vessels bringing more than 23000 hp to the job. This job starts in the Princess Arianehaven. 

And what’s the tow?

And how many tugs does it take?  Here’s Maker assisted by Mutratug 32,  quite interesting in her own right as a Carrousel RAVE tug. Click here for more.

But I digress.  Maersk Resilient (2008) is moving out to the Stella Oil/Gas Field with this assistance. The additional tugs are Multratug 5 and FairPlay 27 and 28.

 

And here Bugsier 3 intrudes on the scene.

All photos taken last weekend by Jan Oosterboer and delivered via Jan van der Doe.

You also have one more day to name the port and guess the date in yesterday’s post.

 

Andrew J graced this port I’ve passed many times both by water and highway.  Any guesses where I took this photo?  I watched their July 4 2016 fireworks. Answer follows. That power plant opened in 1950 as well;  it’s shuttered and a plan to repower it from coal to natural gas has fallen through.

Andrew J is a 1950 build, less than 50′ loa. I took a photo of one of Andrew J‘s fleet mates here in 2016, although then West Wind –a boat with a really random history–was working for another company.

Kurt R. Luedtke has been working its way around Lake Ontario this season.  I missed her in Sodus Bay, but

the other day caught her in Fair Haven NY.   Kurt R. has previously appeared on this blog here and here.

Any guesses where Gulf Spray does her work?  I suppose the paint on the light house may be a clue.

Closer up . . .  both these photos come thanks to Justin Zizes.

Gulf Spray, a Nova Scotia 1959 build,  works in Halifax.

And finally, the flags are a clue here.  Spes was built in 1946, and the photo comes thanks to Jan van der Doe.  It’s one of many photos he sent me months ago that I’ve been saving for a rainy–or otherwise distracted– day.

Spes, of course, is a Dutch boat.  These photos were taken in the river town of Dordrecht, where I had gone in 2014 for the steam fest that happens there every other year.

Thanks to Jan and Justin for sharing their photos.

The lead photo here was taken in Dunkirk NY, where I had stopped to look for a fish tug.  No dice on the fish tug, though.

 

 

 

Here was the first in this series.  Guess the date these photos were taken?

Consider all that coal smoke.

As it turns out Dockyard III doesn’t always blow so much smoke. Click on this link if you wish, but what I find remarkable there is that Dockyard III and its sisters were built in WW2 for Murmansk and hence have the chimney-encasing wheelhouse (for heat) and an ice-strengthened bpw.

Adelaar dates from 1925.

Paddle steamer De Majesteit dates from 1926.  I saw her on the river in Rotterdam in 2014, and included her in a comparison of old passenger vessels here.

Dockyard IX, part of that same order that never made it to Murmansk, was completed in 1942.  Dockyard IX has been on this blog once before here.

Many steam tugs crowd the river below, but nearest the camera,  that’s Heibok 4, a floating steam crane dating from 1916.

SS Furie, dates from 1916.  I wrote about her extensively here in 2016.

George Stephenson had me fooled;  it was built starting in 2007, ie., she might be called steampunk.  I saw her in May 2014.

Hercules is the real deal steam, launched in 1915.  I was aboard her in 2016, as seen here.

And the answer is late May 2018 at the Dordrecht Steam Festival.  The photos come via Jan van der Doe from the photographer Leo Schuitemaker.

Looking at these photos, I’m again struck by the number of historic vessels preserved and in operating condition in the Netherlands.  Some are scrapped there of course.  Has anyone ever heard of the Dutch reefing boats to create North Sea fish habitat?  These, and I have many others from Jan and Leo I’d love to post,  have benefitted from loving restoration. Let me know if you want more steam tugs.

Amicitia, which I wrote about in 2011, is back to life after 60 years (!!!) underwater as a result of being bombed, not reefed, back then.

Do the Dutch have different financial tools that produces this fruit?  Is it because of their different attitude toward maintaining machines and buildings?  Are there just different priorities throughout Dutch culture?

A google search leads to this article referring to “artificial reefs around the world,” but the headline is quite misleading.

 

New styling for a superstructure?  Ocean7 Projects is an organization I’ve not seen in the sixth boro before.

For a Dutch company, 

it has a great logo with that tulip.

Urk is a small town dating back to medieval times, accustomed to surviving against the sea. I’ll never forget a visit there with cousins on a raw November day, ducking out of the rain into a small bar with nary a straight line anywhere in its construction due to sagging.  The genever warmed otherwise cold bones.

She danced around Bergen Point this morning, seemingly empty from

Haiti.  I’m not sure what she’ll load in Port Newark.

It made my day to see this unusual cargo ship.  As of this posting, she’s southbound along the Delmarva peninsula.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And following up on yesterday’s post, the top AIS screen capture represents many Sunday evenings-into-Monday mornings.  Although Port of NYC/NJ operates non-stop, there’s often a rhythm of emptying-out on the weekend with a surge of new boats at the work week’s start.  The exact  capture was from wee hours of Monday, this week.

More interesting is the followup to the second photo showing Grasp anchored off Fire Island.  Frank Pierson found a news article corroborating what Mike had said . . .  that USNS Grasp (T-ARS-51) was indeed operating at the wreck site of USS San Diego (ACR-6).  Be sure to read the article embedded in his comment. Here’s a video of the ceremony.  Thanks much, Mike and Frank.

On a windy day recently in the Beerkanaal section greater Rotterdam harbor, Jan Oosterboer took these photos, passed along by Jan van der Doe.

The small boats here are operated by the KRVE, self-translated as “rowers” but more likely we’d call them linesmen.  The more distant KRVE boat is alongside Smit Cheetah.  The link that follow are mostly for previous instances these boats have appeared on this blog.

Here’s their own site in English.

Fairplay 27

SD Rebel

Multratug 31

In the distance newly-launched LNG carrier Vladimir Rusanov, shuttling between Rotterdam and Russian Kara Sea port of Sabetta.   I had to look up Sabetta, since I’d not heard of it:  average annual temperature is 14 degrees F, -10 C

Above and below, that’s Smit Hudson.

Iskes tug Venus is about three years old. 

 

Above and below FairPlay X,

which has not been on this blog before.  Multratug 5 shows her Japanese origins, 

here with Beagle, new this spring.

Many thanks to Jan and Jan for these photos.  Any errors in text are mine.

 

These photos come via Jan van der Doe and were taken by Jan Oosterboer in the Lekhaven area of Rotterdam.

Lingestroom, a Damen Shoalbuster 3512 design and launched in 2017, measures 114′ x 39′ and is powered by triple screw driven by three Caterpillar C32-TTA SCAC.

Unrelated, notice the stack for the Atlanship SA orange juice tanker on the far side of the building?  I’m not sure which tanker that is.

MTS Indus is 82′ x 24.’    More info here.  Just beyond Indus and against the dock is MTS Vanquish, a 2909 Stantug design from Damen.

Sea Bronco is a SeaContractor tug with two Caterpillar 3508B engines.

En Avant 20 is a twin Schottel 5000 hp tug built in 2006.  I like the slogan on the building on the right side of the photo.

 

Union Princess is queen of the dock here:  221′ loa x 51′ and powered by two Wärtsilä 16v32 LND engines for a total of just over 16,000 hp.

Dian Kingdom measures 107′ x 36.’

 

I hope you enjoyed this look around the dock in Lekhaven, thanks to Jan and Jan.  For the first seven in the series, click here.

 

Again, these photos come via Jan van der Doe from Vianen at the Merwedekanaal, and taken by  Huug Pieterse from Arkel and Leo Schuitemaker from Klundert.  By the way, Klundert became a city in 1357!

Noorderlight dates from 1941.  I’m not sure which small tug she’s towing.

Wiepke, 1946.

Zuiderzee, 1930.

Maartje Anna, 1923.

Finally, for now, Noorman, 1939.

Many thanks to Jan.  I’m working on catching up.  All these photos–today’s and yesterday’s–were taken in the second half of May.

 

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