You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Netherlands’ category.

We’re going west to east to south to farther east in today’s post, starting with the Missouri River north of Omaha by about 50 miles at the port of Blencoe IA.  From here grain and soybeans are barged all the way to the New Orleans area for transshipment to foreign markets.  That’s MV Tony Lippman stemming the current after dropping off some barges with fertilizer ingredients she’s pushed all the way here, fertilizer that arrived in the US by bulk carrier from foreign producers.

MV Tony Lippman is 144′ x 35′.  For more specs on this 1971 build, click here.

These two boats, at the Upper Mississippi River port of Hannibal, almost look familiar, but they are Sir Josie T and Sir Robert.  For more info, click here and see a photo by Tim Powell, frequent contributor on this blog.

CMT on the stack above stands for Canton Marine Towing. Near to far here are Sir Richard and Sir Robert

Now we’re back in the sixth boro and at the south side eastern tip of Motby.  From left, it’s Teresa, barge Acadia, Jane A. Bouchard, Evelyn Cutler, and Susan Rose.  Note that Teresa has a small US flag high in the rigging.  Might that be a courtesy flag in the wrong location, since she’s said to be flagged Liberian?  I was hoping to see her stern to confirm that. 

From Tony A and on a rainy day,

it’s Steven Wayne!  She first became a regular in the sixth boro as Patapsco.

Courtesy of a son of Neptune aka Neptuni filius himself, the vessel alluded to in a recent post and now here for all to see, it’s M. A. R. S. War Machine, ex-Paul T. Moran.   The photo was taken somewhere in the south.

And finally, from the mighty Ij River, it’s a 1907 or 1904 built Anna Sophia.  Photo by een zoon van Ij.

All photos, except of course those by Tony A and the sons above, WVD.

Rumor has it that tomorrow is an unusual day that in years past I have acknowledged.  I’m staying put.

Credit for all here goes to Sea Bart aka Zee Bart, which means the same thing.  He writes:  “When we moored in the Lekhaven in Rotterdam in August 2021 I saw a seemingly abandoned tugboat moored called Dynami, had some list, no lights on,  etc. etc.    During the following weeks we noticed more and more attention for this tug from the Rotterdam Port Authorities (RPA) that were regularly visiting.


One day they actually pulled a chain around the wheel house, not only to prevent people going in but also to detain the vessel.  Every day one or more of the RPA patrol boats would check up on Dynami.  End of last week suddenly there was a bilge boat alongside and they spent a full day sucking stuff (old fuel, bilges, sludge) out of the vessel.    Later, one of the vessels from HEBO Maritime Services arrived to to nail boards over all the doors and close off the funnels with big bags.

And then last Wednesday another tug showed up and  Dynami was pushed away to probably a safer, more secure berth awaiting her faith. I guess to be sold via auction in the near future and then off to the scrapyard.

“Dynami, from what I can find, was built in Spain in 1976 as Sertosa Diecisette, then in 1977 became Sertosa Dieciocho, and based in Cadiz.  In 2016, she was sold to Iceland as the Togarinn, where she worked until 2020.  She was then towed from Rekyavik with the destination of Belgium to be scrapped, renamed Dynami and flying the flag of Seychelles.  For whatever reason, she never made it to the scrapyard;  instead she arrived in Bolnes port near Rotterdam. In August 2021 Panamanian interests  purchased her and a crew began a voyage to Colon PA. She never made it there either, because the next day she was back in Rotterdam, with oil leaking and her latest crew disappeared.   She  has since been laying in  Lekhaven.

 

The little pusher tug called Gepke III is interesting as well, build in 1957 and still going strong….although it had some changes over the years: multiple times new bridge and accommodation, I guess it has been re-powered a few times in that time frame as well.
More info & pics here.”

Note the yellow RPA vessel off the starboard side of Dynami.

Many thanks to Sea Bart, one of the flying Dutchmen I have the pleasure of knowing.

 

Sleepboot . . .?  it’s Dutch for tugboat.  It’s pronounced more like “slape boat”

See the tricolor courtesy flag between the lower and upper wheelhouse?  The photos were taken Monday (July 5)  by Jan Oosterboer, in Het Scheur, aka “the rip”, a section of the Rhine-Maas-Scheldt delta near Rotterdam.

And those certainly are not buoys you’d see in the US.

Weeks tug Thomas recently arrived in Rotterdam area.

It’s just off the Nieuwe Maas in the Delfshaven section of Waalhaven.  The Plymouth pilgrims ended their Dutch sojourn by departing from the port of Delfshaven.  It’s not too far from all these kinds of sights.

Thomas towed barge Oslo and had an assist from Dutch telescoping-house tug Walvis

Thomas may be doing crew change in Rotterdam;  a few months back they were working off Ascension Island!

Many thanks to Jan and Jan for sending along these photos.  Evidently, a US tugboat in the Netherlands draws attention!  I’d love to hear more of the story.

 

 

A picture is worth a thousand words, even if the picture is a video still and grainy.  This picture launched a 1000  (actually about 1300) words, which you can read in the embedded link at the end of this post.

So, just the basics will be in this post, since the story is in the link.

It was cold and dark in early December when Sheri Lynn S cracked some new ice in departing from the dock in Picton ON,

heading into Picton Bay

to meet this ship . . . delivering steel from Korea.

Communications describe how the ship intends to dock, and

Sheri Lynn S accommodates the plan, crew on the tug here prepare to send a line up to the crew on the ship.

 

Once the ship Lake Erie is secure, the tug heads into the frozen area of the Bay

to tie up until the next job.

Here are some shots on Picton Terminals last summer.

Click here for the article I did on the boat, crew, and operation.

Many thanks to Picton Terminals for assistance.  All photos except the video still at the beginning by Will Van Dorp, who will have additional news from Picton soon.

Another tug Jed photographed in Rotterdam is

photo date 17 june 2018

Jaro II.

photo date 17 june 2018

The 1990 Damen STAN 2909 appears to have a stop in the Netherlands after having worked in the Dutch Antilles and before going to Portugal.   Unlike a lot of Damen STAN products, Jaro II was built in the Netherlands.

photo date 17 June 2018

 

photo date 17 june 2018

Thanks much, Jed.

 

 

 

Jed–John Jedrlinic–has been busy, but recently he sent some photos from Rotterdam.

photo date 17 june 2018

ALP Winger is a huge anchor-handling tug:  213′ 59′ x 25′

photo date 17 june 2018

He got these photos in Rotterdam, but the boat is currently in the Azores.

photo date 17 june 2018

With her five mains, she generates over 18000 horsepower.

photo date 17 june 2018

 

photo date 17 june 2018

This is definitely a boat for a niche.  Many thanks to Jed for these photos.  more to come.

The other nine ALP vessels can be found here. Their largest, ALP Striker, was built in Niigata, Japan.  Specs here, including over 24k horsepower, and dimensions of 291′ x 69′ x 28′

Here are previous installments.

I caught Invictus earlier this week as it came into the boro.  I had no idea then that by midweek, it would become newsworthy, although it would be on Page Six.  Anyone know what I’m talking about?  Answer follows.

I don’t know if this is the Invictus owner driving the tender or wearing the red shirt topside in the photo above, but this tender followed the bigger vessel in.  Invictus is US built by Delta, although it’s not US-flagged.

Lady May IV, tied up over at Chelsea Piers is Dutch built. It’s smaller than Invictus and for sale for about one-third the price of Invictus.

If I’m correct about the larger of two yachts directly below the Empire State Building, that Utopia IV, Italian built. I have seen a Utopia II and III in the boro in previous years, although I’m not sure there’s a connection.

Contina has been here before;  it appears to be Brazil built by Inace yachts of Fortaleza.  I wonder why the CO painted on the bow previously is no longer there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, and here’s the story of Invictus, one that has to do with soccer champions, about half of whom come from California.  The rich and famous used to travel in style on ocean liners.

Again, notice the variety of shoreline backgrounds?

Related:  Here’s a conversion from commercial vessel to motor yacht Voyager I’d love to see when it’s complete.

 

I took these photos this morning in North Cove, the same place I took photos of a youthful Brigitte Bardot about six weeks ago here.

If you saw Brigitte Bardot, you’ve at least a sense of what this could be, but I’ll leave any identification in suspension until the end of the post.  I wish I’d seen this vessel coming in at the Narrows.

Port beam above and stern quarter view below.

And bow quarter.  I took these around 0800 because I had other places to be later.  It has a color scheme that’s almost like a geometric dazzle.

 

Ready for a clue?

See the chrome lettering lower left?  Damen.

Click here for photos and info on this vessel, Ad-Vantage, a Damen YS (yacht support) 5009, a 182′ vessel.  See it launch toys including a mini submarine here.   Ad-Vantage has been around since 2012.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s posted previously on vessels in North Cove here, here, here, and more.

Here are all the previous installments of this series.

Glenn Raymo caught this photo up the Hudson the other day, as Joker assisted a Weeks crane.  Hays tugs do come up here occasionally, but I’ve never seen them.

Back almost exactly six years ago, the same boat headed upriver as a dead ship.  And eight years ago, working for a different company and painted in a different livery, here she was . . .  2011, eastbound in the KVK.

Justin Zizes was coming down the Hudson recently and caught this spring-evoking photo of Nathan G, her gray livery and aggregate cargo set off by the hint of leaves on the tree-lined far shore.

Thanks to Justin also for this photo of Mister Jim in her homeport in Coeymans.

Jan van der Doe sent these photos along of a group of northern European tugs at work, taken in early April by Jan Oosterboer, not far from Rotterdam.

Mutratug 32 is a Carrousel Rave tug, which means she rotate her point of attachment to better brake the assisted vessel.  To see her in action, click here.

And finally, see the tugs in this photo I took on the East River the other day?  Two of them?

Thomas J. Brown is obvious and always a delight to see.  But then there’s Bosco on the barge.  I believe she was heading for a job on the Hutchinson River.

Thanks to Glenn, Justin, Jan, and Jan for photos here.

 

Here are some previous posts with photos from Jan.

So here’s the tugboat, just out of the shipyard near the Arctic Circle and at work, the last in a series of five identical anchor handling tug supply (AHTS) vessels bringing more than 23000 hp to the job. This job starts in the Princess Arianehaven. 

And what’s the tow?

And how many tugs does it take?  Here’s Maker assisted by Mutratug 32,  quite interesting in her own right as a Carrousel RAVE tug. Click here for more.

But I digress.  Maersk Resilient (2008) is moving out to the Stella Oil/Gas Field with this assistance. The additional tugs are Multratug 5 and FairPlay 27 and 28.

 

And here Bugsier 3 intrudes on the scene.

All photos taken last weekend by Jan Oosterboer and delivered via Jan van der Doe.

You also have one more day to name the port and guess the date in yesterday’s post.

 

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