You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Netherlands’ category.

Click here to see previous sets sent along by Jed.  This set I’m arranging by year of build.   1972. A little info more, she’s 98′ x 30.’

photo date 5 SEPT 2012

photo date 5 SEPT 2012

1977.  She’s a bit larger, 115′ x 33.’

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

1978.  Husky has been renamed Maro, and she’s massive, 197′ x 50′ and moved by 12,000 hp.

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

1998.  115′ x 36′  Here was a post I did about an incident of near capsize with FairPlay 21.  FairPlay 22 did capsize with loss of life.

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

2001 and identical dimensions to FairPlay 23. 

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

2009, and 92′ x 35.’

photo date 8 SEPT 2012

photo date 8 SEPT 2012

2009 and 105′ x 43.’

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

2010 and 95′ x 39.’

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

2011 and 105′ x 39.’

photo date 8 SDEPT 2012

photo date 8 SEPT 2012

Many thanks to Jed, aka John Jedrlinic, for these photos, and for being patient while they collected in my inbox.  Here are some of the many Dutch tugs appearing here previously.

 

This is my Janus post . . . which I’ll start with a photo I took in January 2007 of an intriguing set of sculptures, since licensed to Trinity Church in Manhattan.

Since I’ve tons to do today, comment will be minimal.  The photo below I took near the KVK salt pile on January 14, 2016.  Eagle Ford, to the right, has since been scrapped in Pakistan.

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The history of Alnair, photo taken in Havana harbor on February 4, 2016, is still untraced.  It looks like an ex-USN tug.  Click here for more Cuban photos.

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This photo of JRT Moran and Orange Sun I took on March 12.

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This photo of Hudson was taken in Maassluis, very near where my father grew up,  on April 4. Many more Maassluis photos can be found here.

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Sandmaster I photographed here on May 6.  since then, she’s moved to Roatan, I’m told, and I’d love to go there and see how she’s doing.  Maybe I can learn some Garifuna while I’m there.

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June 1, I took this, with Robert E. McAllister and an invisible Ellen escorting Maersk Idaho out the door.

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July 14, I saw GL tug Nebraska yank bulkier Isolda with 56,000 tons of corn through a narrow opening and out the Maumee.

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August 23 I caught Atlantic Sail outbound past a nearly completed Wavertree.  And come to think of it, this is a perfect Janus photo.

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September 9 at the old port in Montreal I caught Svitzer Montreal tied up and waiting for the next job.

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October 18, I caught Atlanticborg and Algoma Enterprise down bound between Cape Vincent and Clayton NY.

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November 4, while waiting for another tow, I caught Sarah Ann switching out scrap scows in the Gowanus.

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And I’ll end this retrospective Janus post with a mystery shot, which I hope to tell you more about in 2017.  All I’ll say is that I took it yesterday and can identify only some of what is depicted. Anyone add something about this photo?

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I feel blessed with another year of life, energy, gallivants, and challenges.  Thank you for reading and writing me.  Special thanks to you all who sent USPS cards !  I wish everyone a happy and prosperous 2017.   Here’s what Spock would say and where he got it.

Here was my “last hours” post from 2015.  And here from the year before with some vessels sailing away forever.   And here showing what I painted in the last hours of 2013.  And one more with origins “oud jaardag” stuff from the finale of 2011.

I did this once before here.  This time I was deleting near duplicates to limit the size of my photo library to accommodate the many photos I brought back from the gallivants, and my mind quickly formed today’s post.  Enjoy all these from August through October 2009 and marvel at how much the harbor changes.   As I went through the archives, this is where I stopped, given the recent developments in Bella Bella BC.

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For background on this tug, check here.

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Notice also the Bayonne approach to the bridge.

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IMO 8983117 was still orange back then.

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King Philip, Thomas Dann, and Patriot Service . . .

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Odin . . .  now has a fixed profile.

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And these two clean looking machines — Coral Queen and

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John B. Caddell — were still with us.

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This is a digression to March 2010, but since I’m in a temporally warped thought, let me add this photo of the long-gone Kristin Poling.

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Back to 2009, Rosemary looked sweet here in fall scenes.

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John Reinauer . . . I wonder what that tug looks like today over in Nigeria.

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And Newtown Creek, now the deep Lady Luck of the Depths, sure looked good back then.

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And while I’m at it, I’ve finally solved a puzzle that’s bugged me for a few years.  Remember this post from three and a half years ago about a group of aging Dutch sailors who wanted to hold a reunion on their vessel but couldn’t find the boat, a former Royal Dutch Navy tug named Wamandai A870?  Well, here’s the boat today!  Well, maybe . . .

Another boat you can dive on is United Caribbean aka Golden Venture.

Photos and tangents by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are more photos from Aleksandr, taken on a canal between Middelburg and Vlissingen.    Ruurtje tows while

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F-50 takes the stern as they move

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the aluminum superstructure of a future Damen-built patrol craft on barge Risico 11.

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Click here for another view of the tow.   Click here for a view of the Damen yard there.

Aleksandr sent me these photos about a month ago.  He took them on April 20 passing Vlissingen and headed generally northward.   And I’m somewhat stumped.  What does Flintercoral look like to you?

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To me it looks like a new build, going elsewhere for completion.

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Multratug 27 takes the bow and

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Multrasalvor 3 at the stern.

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So I guess here’s the story:  it was completed as a container vessel, and although it has a Flinter- name, Flinter- never took ownership because the yard had gone bankrupt beforehand.  It seems then that some time later, the ship was purchased by Necon, and  converted into a semi-submersible.  Necon, it seems, has only this vessel.  But why it was under tow a month ago is a mystery.

My experience with Flinter is from 2009, when Flinterduin brought the Dutch sailing barges to the sixth boro, and then Flinterborg picked them up in Albany and returned them to Dutch waters.

The same day, Aleksandr caught Smit Sentosa on its arrival from a one-month passage in from Capetown.

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Many thanks to Aleksandr for these photos.  Previously his photos and drawings have appeared here.  Vlissingen (origin of the name of the NYC area called Flushing, settled in 1645) is a quite old port in Zeeland.

So here was 1 and in it I said I would answer a question in a few days and now a few weeks have passed.  The question pertained to the device mounted on the stern of vessel

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Husky.  Congrats to Seth Tane, who guessed correctly.  Here’s what Xtian writes:  “It’s a plough.  In French we talk about “nivelage” [leveling], which means after dredging the bottom of the sea is like a field that has just passed a plow.  This tool cuts the bump to fill the gap.  It’s also used in the rivers where the “alluvium” or the mud stays in always same places because of the current and built like “bottom hill” there.  And it happens also in some harbour (like ferries’ harbour) as because the ferries always doing the same maneuver and raise the mud that still lay at the same place.

With the plough used at the right time, ebb tide for example, the mud is raised and leaves the harbour with tidal current.  In some places the plough is used to feed the hopper dredger –  when the dredger is too large, the plough is used to remove a “bottom hill” when they are close to the bank to give the mud at the place where the hopper dredge is working.   The plough is not only used with mud but also with sand or pebble.  Google with words : Dredge – Plough.

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About Husky, the day I took this picture she was working closely with the dredge Rijndelta at the entrance of Maasvlakte harbor.   I add a picture of her below.”
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More of Xtian’s photos follow, like this closeup of the captain of Smit Cheetah,

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Fairplay 24 and 21,

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Union 11 passing the Mammoet headquarters,

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Smit Schelde,

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SD Rebel,

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Multratug 31, 

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Osprey Fearless, 

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Pieter (?) towing Matador 2,

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and finally the recently completed Noordstroom.

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Many thanks to Xtian for these photos of another watershed.

All these photos come through Fred Trooster.

Let’s start with the new build Noordstroom which wasn’t splashed until midMarch 2016.  Click here to see the triple-screw vessel at various stages of construction.

rrt1Calandkanaal - aan de trekpaal - 0107

 

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Catharina 7 on the other hand, is from 1958.  Here she passes the Bollard.

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Here’s 1973 built Pacific Hickory.  I’m not sure what’s brought her to greater Rotterdam.

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And we end today’s post with Osprey Fearless, 1997 built.

rr6OSPREY FEARLESS, Lekhaven - 141

 

All photos by Freek Koning and via Fred Trooster.  Thank you very much.

Traffic backed up.  But in Schiedam it’s because of a drawbridge that’s up to allow a self-propelled barge to back out.  More on that later.  That windmill?  It’s at the Nolet distillery, a Ketel One facility that makes many spirits besides vodka.

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Here’s the 1962 motorvrachtschip, Sentinela,

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squeezing through the lock and

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returning to the main waterway after delivering one of two loads of sand per day to the glass-making plant just up the creek from Ketel One.

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But Hercules is the reason I’m here today.  The big steam vessel event is only a month and some away, so it’s painting and refurbishing time to prepare her.  For a larger set of photos of the preparations, including the mounting of a new mast created out of an old spar by Fred Trooster, click here.

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Here is a set of photos I took of Hercules two years ago at the steam festival.

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The barge being towed here is loaded upside and down below with smaller steam engine applications.

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Click on the photo below to hear how silently she runs.

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To keep her running, the owner Kees Boekweit needs to fabricate some of the parts himself.  He works as a steam engineer over at –you guessed it–Ketel One.   Click on the photo below to see a shorter video of her running on the North Sea.

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Here are the fireboxes under the boiler.

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Here is a cold firebox and

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an empty coal pocket.

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And one last glimpse of traffic on the main waterway here, Friday last Ovation of the Sea arrived in Rotterdam for the first time.  See eight minutes of edited tape here.  By the way, the KRVE boats are the line handlers.  Clearly, though, the tugs steal the show providing what I’ll call a “Dutch welcome,” to coin a phrase.

 

 

This is a 1959 vessel with a rich and varied career.  Click here for photos from a maritime festival last year, and  here (scroll) with info about her sojourn in the US.

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Click on the photo below to hear her run.

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Click here to watch a 20-minute video documenting her meeting a near-sister a few years back.  The sister has been converted into a private yacht. See them together here. The next two photos I took in NL in 2014.

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That’s Fred Trooster and me in the photo below;  thanks Fred for the invitation to come aboard Elbe.

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For some of Fred’s photos of the visit, click here.

Marginally related, I wonder when a similar pilot boat–Wega–will leave its custody in Rio here (and scroll).

Also, marginally related and in response to a question from sfdi1947, click here for interactive navigation charts (waterkaarten or vaarkaarten) for Dutch inland waters, fun to play with but likely not guaranteed for actual use.

 

Now let’s bounce back south of Leiden, west of Rotterdam . . . to Maassluis.  Notice all the gray color upper left side of the aerial below . . .  all greenhouses!  I have lots of fun looking at this part of NL by google map.

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At the center of Maassluis  . . . you guessed it, there’s an island called Church Island,  because

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at its center is a church, completed in 1639.

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I believe the larger vessel here–seen next to the drawbridge above–is Jansje, built 1900. The smaller one . . . I don’t know.

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Check out the wheel

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I’m guessing this was a fish market . . .

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as my attempt (help?) at translation here is “people who sail something well, God takes them with him.”  How far off am I?

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Anyhow, that 1664 building is on Anchor Street and leads to the De Haas shipyard.

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Harbor tug Maassluis was built right here by De Haas in 1949.

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Below is a photo I took of her back in 2014 in Dordrecht.

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Salvage vessel Bruinvisch first launched in 1937, and has returned to a pristine state by the efforts of many volunteers.  You can befriend her on FB at “Bergingsvaartuig Bruinvisch.”

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Notice the white building off the stern of tug Hudson?  That is the National Dutch Towage Museum.  I wanted to visit but came at the wrong hour.  Oh well, next time, Kees.

 

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The next three photos come from John van der Doe, who sent them a few months back.

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Furie is a sea-going steam tug built in 1916.  You can see many photos of her on FB at “StichtingHollandsGlorie.”

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And Hudson, 1939, currently without an engine, narrowly escaped being scrapped.  She spent a number of years in the 60s and 70s as a floating ice-making plant.

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Many thanks to John for these last photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who has more Maassluis photos tomorrow.  One more for now, the day I was there, Furie was over in the De Haas yard.

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And below is a print I found on board Hercules–this coming Sunday’s p0st–showing Furie in a dramatic sea.

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I couldn’t get a photo, but as a monument in a traffic circle in Maassluis, there’s a huge beting aka H-bitt.  Here’s a photo . . . it may be the third one.

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