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Amsterdam has appeared here  a lot, but all the photos in this post come from Jan van der Doe.  This tug looks a little like Odin, the telescoping house well-suited for the low bridges of A’dam.  I like the container-inspired deckhouse as well.

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Here, at the National Maritime Museum, is an exact replica of the East Indiaman Amsterdam, which wrecked on its maiden voyage before it had even left Europe.

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PA4 is a Damen built tug.

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The Zulu-class Soviet sub–well-graffittied over in the maritime area of North Amsterdam was “beyond belief,” not a surprise because a sign at the entrance to this dock calls it a “place beyond belief.”

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Let me digress and put up some photos I never got around to in 2014.

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You have to admit that a vandalized Soviet sub is quite strange.

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Here’s the entrance to this area;  notice the Botel–a repurposed North Sea oil field accommodations barge–in the background.

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For vessels big and

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small, Amsterdam is one of those cities everyone should visit at some point.

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Click here for some of the many port posts I’ve done.

 

All photos here by Jan van der Doe, except for #5–7, which were by me, Will Van Dorp.

“I have worked on two salvage tugs,” writes Jan.  “The first one, Hercules in 1957-1958, was a seagoing salvage-tug/icebreaker built in 1943 for the German Air Force/Navy to salvage plane wrecks in the Baltic Sea.  After the war the tug sailed for Bugsier and came under the Dutch flag in 1950.  In 1984 [ as Temi IV] it capsized and sank. Salvaged and scrapped.”
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“The second one was Zeepaard [ trans. Seahorse] in 1960-1961.   Zeepaard was built in 1947 and used as tug/salvage tug by Tak’s Berging (W.A van den Tak Bergings Bedrijf N.V.),  a sister company of L. Smit & Co. Internationale Sleepdienst Mij. N.V.  Still in service.  Now as a pusher-tug with the name Liberty.”
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Thanks, Jan.

What better vessel to post about on the winter solstice than a lightship.  Here, here, and here are some previous ones.

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This particular lightship I saw east of Rotterdam in May 2014.

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It’s not particularly old, so I hope it’ll be a reminder in dark times into the distant future.

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Here’s part of the story.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

One more winter solstice post from the archives here, but this year I’m not thinking about the 182 or whatever days until the summer solstice.  Maybe it just feels like the world’s a darker place than it used to be and we need light and relief now.

I took this photo back in 2008, and it seemed I never got back to it.  At the time, I didn’t realize it was built in 1904 and had once done the Buffalo–Duluth passenger run with first-class staterooms.  Buffalo–Duluth passenger ferry  SS Juniata . . . doesn’t even seem reasonable a century later.

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Between 1937 and 1941, she was thoroughly upgraded and  “returned to work  as the Milwaukee Clipper and carried passengers and their cars between Muskegon and Milwaukee until 1970 when the interstate highways and air travel rendered her obsolete.”    I’m told volunteers are working to preserve her.  I’d love to hear a progress report.

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In contrast, the rest of the photos I took on the Arthur Kill in 2010, and what you see here is no longer there.  I’m going out on a limb here, and guessing it’s the Astoria aka William T. Collins, built in 1925 and out of documentation in 1966.

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I recall reading that it was removed –as an eyesore–since then, but can’t find any newspaper record of such.  Anyone help out?   My co-explorer here is none other than frogma . . . .

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Click here for a post I did on a re-purposed 1929 NYC ferry still operational as a double-ended construction vessel,  click here for a post I did on a NYC-NJ ferry that operated as such between 1905 and 1970 before being repurposed as a restaurant until neglect and a certain Irene came along, and here for a post on what might be the oldest in service ferry in the US.

Below is P/S Majesteit, a 1926 steam ferry still operating in Rotterdam as a floating restaurant steam side paddle wheeler;

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here’s their site with photos of the steam machinery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Let’s start at the sixth boro’s own Kearny Point.  Federal Ship Building & Dry Dock used to be there.  On December 1, 1943, a time when that place was turning out a vessel a week or so, hull #303 was delivered as USS Stern, DE-187.     After eight years as a USN vessel, she was transferred to the Netherlands as F-811, HNLMS Van Zijll, her identity until 1967 when she was returned to the US and scrapped.

John van der Doe, frequent contributor on this blog, sailed on F-811 around the world in 1954–55, as he says “employed with the US Naval Task-force Pacific fleet 4 or 6 (forgot the number) during the Korean war.”

Port Said, 1954, north entrance to the Suez Canal.  The large statue shows Ferdinand de Lesseps.  A few years later, the statue was dynamited as celebration of the nationalization of the Canal.

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Aden, stop for bunkers.

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Hong Kong, awaiting orders.

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Yokosuka, Japan, here and

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here.   That background landscape is still recognizable today.

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Papeete.

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Click here for some more of that era.

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Pacific side of the Panama Canal, now 1955.

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Original “mule” style.  Click here (and scroll) for photos of the mules from 2012.  I wonder what the next generation will be.

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And here’s a photo of the Kearny-built vessel taking on stores in Ponta Delgada, Azores.

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Later, Jan took this photo in then-Leningrad.  I believe that’s St. Isaac’s Cathedral.

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Many thanks to Jan for these photos from long ago and faraway.

Call this GHP&W 11.

Botlek is a section of the port of Rotterdam.  Here tugs Smit Texelbank and En Avant 1 and 20 assist craneship Oleg Strashnov into port for regular maintenance.

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Prior to coming into port, Oleg Strashnov had been working in the North Sea gas fields.

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Click here for more particulars of the craneship.  Click here for some of the many posts I’ve done on the port of Rotterdam.

These photos come via Fred Trooster.

Here are the previous posts in this series, showing the removal and disposal of the wreck of the RORO Baltic Ace, which sank after a collision in December 2012.

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After more than two years underwater, this is how things appear.

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Many thanks for these photos to Jan Oosterboer via Fred Trooster.

 

 

Hudson, launched 1939, spent WW2 working for the British Ministry of Shipping, having left the Netherlands with a tow to Africa just before the Germany invasion and occupation.  After the War, it towed to ports worldwide until 1963, when it was deemed underpowered and sold for scrap.  Instead, it was purchased by a fishery as an ice-making ship, which it did until 1989.  And again it was to be scrapped.  This time, a foundation bought it, invested 14 years of restoration, and now, as a unique industrial  artifact, it’s berthed in Maassluis, where visitors can picture the life of those in ocean towing from just before WW2 until 1960.

 

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Hercules was built in the Netherlands in 1915 and worked for a Danish company until the late 1970s, when it was purchased for much-needed restoration.  See its condition here.

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Furie has a similar story:  it was built in the Netherlands in 1916, sold to a Swedish lumber company in 1918.  It worked mostly on the Baltic until 1976, when it was returned to the Netherlands for restoration and assumed a role in a Dutch TV series called Hollands Glorie, inspired by Jan de Hartog novel.  You can watch the 90-minute series pilot here.   It was made in 1977 and in Dutch, but it follows a new chief mate named Jan Wandelaar (hiker or wanderer) in the “hiring hall.”   Give it a shot.  If you want to skip around, the captain’s character gets established around the 10-minute mark.  Around the 21-minute mark they are off the coast of Ireland.  Around the 29-minute mark, the captain negotiates in his version of English for the tow and the next few minutes are exciting.  Around 41 minutes in, they are towing a dredge along the WestAfrican coast to Nigeria.  Around 1 hour 5,” they deal with a leak in the dredge.

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Equally picturesque although I don’t know the stories are Anna and

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Alphecca.

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These photos by Freek Konings come via Fred Trooster, to whom both I am grateful.

This post from 2013  was prompted by a request from Freek that I try to learn the disposition of a former Dutch Navy tug, likely sunk by the USCG.  We are still looking for info on the fate of Wamandai.

Sail Amsterdam ended a month ago, but these photos come from a relative who works for Dutch law enforcement and could mingle freely with his vessel.  Thanks cousin.

New Yorkers should easily recognize this vessel, in spite of some slightly different trappings.

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Guayas, the Ecuadorian tall ship, called in the sixth boro three years ago.  

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Guayas was assisted by Aaron on the bow.  Can anyone identify the tug hanging on the stern?  Aaron appeared here once a year ago.

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Sirius is an Iskes tug that outpowers Aaron by about four-fold.

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Steam tug Scheelenkuhlen (70′ x 21′ x 6′ draft and 65 tons) dates from 1927.

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Anny, built 1957, has a telescoping wheelhouse visible here and works Amsterdam’s canals, as seen here.

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A876 Hunze, launched 1987, is one of five large tugs operated by the Royal Dutch Navy.

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Shipdock VI measures 52′ x 13.’

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I can’t tell you much about Jan.

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Voorzan III dates from 1932.  Stadt Amsterdam has called in the sixth boro several times.

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Triton 2008 is another Iskes tug. 

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They’re all beauties . . . from Zeetijger to

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Maasstroom.

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And this has to be a tanker that delights when she calls into port at the end of the day.

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Let’s call it quits for today with a tug operated by the Port of Amsterdam . . . PA5 aka Pollux

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All photos by “Hans Brinker.”

I’ve gotten a bit behind with photos from the Netherlands.  These were taken in early June.

By now, Havila Neptune has made its way across the North Sea to Scotland, towing

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Paragon B391, with Multratug 4 and others.

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Seven Discovery is still in greater Rotterdam.

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Tug Atlas . . .has returned from Rotterdam to the Baltic.

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Here’s an interesting one . .  bucket ladder dredge Stepan Demeshev was in Rotterdam waiting for heavy lift ship Tern to take it to Mumbai.   As of this writing (July 8), Tern with cargo was in the southern Red Sea bound for the Mandeb Strait.

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Last but not least for this update and here assisted by Smit Cheetah and Smit Ebro,  . . . it’s Vanuatu-flagged Global 1200

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currently working off Normandy.

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Many thanks to Jan and Fred for these Rotterdam photos.  I’m struck–as always–by the variety of vessels  that call there and then move on to the next job.

Any errors in current info on these vessels is due simply to me.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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