You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Netherlands’ category.

Again, these photos come via Jan van der Doe from Vianen at the Merwedekanaal, and taken by  Huug Pieterse from Arkel and Leo Schuitemaker from Klundert.  By the way, Klundert became a city in 1357!

Noorderlight dates from 1941.  I’m not sure which small tug she’s towing.

Wiepke, 1946.

Zuiderzee, 1930.

Maartje Anna, 1923.

Finally, for now, Noorman, 1939.

Many thanks to Jan.  I’m working on catching up.  All these photos–today’s and yesterday’s–were taken in the second half of May.

 

These photos come via Jan van der Doe from Vianen at the Merwedekanaal, and taken by  Huug Pieterse from Arkel and Leo Schuitemaker from Klundert.  By the way, Klundert became a city in 1357!

I’m making an attempt at matching these up with some basic info.  So Storm dates from 1909 and David from 1947.

Harmonie is 1919,

Jan, 1917; and

Guardian is 1926.

 

Elizabeth . ..  I don’t know.

I have many, many more photos from Jan to catch up on, and will try to do so.  What always amazes me is how many restored tugboats/yachts there are in the Netherlands.

In the photos below you are looking at Time is Money, a famous parlevinker.  A what??!

Well, have a close look and you’ll know . . .

A parlevinker is basically a floating supermarket, or more like a bodega on the water.  In English it’s a bum boat, but when’s the last time you saw a functioning bum boat;  there might still be one in NY harbor here, but it’s been converted into a loft on water.  It wouldn’t work in the sixth boro, IMHO, because we don’t have a critical mass of people working and living on or in close enough proximity to the water.  Click here for more info on Time is Money and its longtime owner Wim van Vooren.    And if you look up-close at the exhibits on the top deck below the flags, they’re some Hertog Jan, sister beverages of Budweiser, siblings of the InBev family.

And while we’re on the unusual, ws, Walter, a frequent commenter here, told me about a lot of lobsters being released into the sixth boro last week:  “Last Friday, a group of local Buddhists released a lot of live lobster into the North River at 100th Street. It’s been done before.  I don’t know the lobster’s chances of survival, but it’s got to be a lot better than their chances of survival if they ended up on someone’s plate.”  Here’s a Huff Post account.

These photos and many more to come were taken last weekend in the Netherlands by Leo Schuitemaker and forwarded by Jan van der Doe.   Many thanks Jan and Leo.

Here’s a seven minute video clip on Time is Money.  It’s in Dutch, but the interesting images start after one minute.  Some translation:  His family started the  business in 1932, when there were about a hundred such boats working the inland waterways in the Netherlands.  He himself started in 1962.  He would serve 10–35 clients a day.  A few of the “shopping in the waterway on the fly” scenes are great. Here’s a 20-minute one.

More old steel today and all from Jan van der Doe.  I posted a stern view of the vessel below a few days ago . . . here’s more of the story, as much as I understand.  Between 1944 and 1990, it had German, Belgian, and Dutch owners, both governmental and private.  Since 1990, it’s been owned by Americans who keep it in Rotterdam.

The rest of these photos Jan took in Hamilton ON, and some of the boats

might be in greater jeopardy.  Florence M, Tony MacKay, and James A. Hannah have all been on this blog before, and with some of the same company.  One of these days, they may no longer be there, and they may no longer BE.

I gather these are Carrol C 1 and Bonnie B. from that same 2015 post.

Molly M I works for Nadro Marine and was built in 1962.

William is the name and Bermingham is the company here, and she’s almost 80 years old.   Unrelated:  What material is stored in the domes?

Many thanks to Jan for his updates from Rotterdam and Hamilton.

 

If you’ve yet to make your first trip to the Netherlands and you’re interested in tugboats, then Maassluis in one of a handful of must-see places.    Jan van der doe went there recently and sent these.  I was there last year and got some of the same photos, just two months later in the season.  As you can see,  the Dutch have wet and misty winters.  This is the “binnenhaven” or “inner harbor.”  For some great 1945 photos of the same place, click here.

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I’m not repeating details on these boats, because most of them I commented on last year.

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This boat’s name is tribute to the same person for whom our fair river is named, obviously.

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Here we move counterclockwise around the harbor;  that white building with the pointy tower is the National Tugboat Museum.

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I’d translate Krimpen as “shrink,” but I don’t know if that’s the sense here.

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Here we’re back to the location of photo #1 but we look to the right, toward the big river, the Nieuwe Waterweg.  “Waterweg” translates as “waterway.”

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If I walk in this direction a few blocks and follow this boat looking to my left, I’d be headed past Schiedam and the Mammoet Bollard Building and get to waters edge Rotterdam, about which I’ve done lots of posts.

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All photos thanks to Jan van der Doe.

Click here to see previous sets sent along by Jed.  This set I’m arranging by year of build.   1972. A little info more, she’s 98′ x 30.’

photo date 5 SEPT 2012

photo date 5 SEPT 2012

1977.  She’s a bit larger, 115′ x 33.’

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

1978.  Husky has been renamed Maro, and she’s massive, 197′ x 50′ and moved by 12,000 hp.

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

1998.  115′ x 36′  Here was a post I did about an incident of near capsize with FairPlay 21.  FairPlay 22 did capsize with loss of life.

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

2001 and identical dimensions to FairPlay 23. 

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

2009, and 92′ x 35.’

photo date 8 SEPT 2012

photo date 8 SEPT 2012

2009 and 105′ x 43.’

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

2010 and 95′ x 39.’

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

photo date 11 SEPT 2012

2011 and 105′ x 39.’

photo date 8 SDEPT 2012

photo date 8 SEPT 2012

Many thanks to Jed, aka John Jedrlinic, for these photos, and for being patient while they collected in my inbox.  Here are some of the many Dutch tugs appearing here previously.

 

This is my Janus post . . . which I’ll start with a photo I took in January 2007 of an intriguing set of sculptures, since licensed to Trinity Church in Manhattan.

Since I’ve tons to do today, comment will be minimal.  The photo below I took near the KVK salt pile on January 14, 2016.  Eagle Ford, to the right, has since been scrapped in Pakistan.

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The history of Alnair, photo taken in Havana harbor on February 4, 2016, is still untraced.  It looks like an ex-USN tug.  Click here for more Cuban photos.

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This photo of JRT Moran and Orange Sun I took on March 12.

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This photo of Hudson was taken in Maassluis, very near where my father grew up,  on April 4. Many more Maassluis photos can be found here.

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Sandmaster I photographed here on May 6.  since then, she’s moved to Roatan, I’m told, and I’d love to go there and see how she’s doing.  Maybe I can learn some Garifuna while I’m there.

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June 1, I took this, with Robert E. McAllister and an invisible Ellen escorting Maersk Idaho out the door.

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July 14, I saw GL tug Nebraska yank bulkier Isolda with 56,000 tons of corn through a narrow opening and out the Maumee.

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August 23 I caught Atlantic Sail outbound past a nearly completed Wavertree.  And come to think of it, this is a perfect Janus photo.

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September 9 at the old port in Montreal I caught Svitzer Montreal tied up and waiting for the next job.

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October 18, I caught Atlanticborg and Algoma Enterprise down bound between Cape Vincent and Clayton NY.

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November 4, while waiting for another tow, I caught Sarah Ann switching out scrap scows in the Gowanus.

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And I’ll end this retrospective Janus post with a mystery shot, which I hope to tell you more about in 2017.  All I’ll say is that I took it yesterday and can identify only some of what is depicted. Anyone add something about this photo?

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I feel blessed with another year of life, energy, gallivants, and challenges.  Thank you for reading and writing me.  Special thanks to you all who sent USPS cards !  I wish everyone a happy and prosperous 2017.   Here’s what Spock would say and where he got it.

Here was my “last hours” post from 2015.  And here from the year before with some vessels sailing away forever.   And here showing what I painted in the last hours of 2013.  And one more with origins “oud jaardag” stuff from the finale of 2011.

I did this once before here.  This time I was deleting near duplicates to limit the size of my photo library to accommodate the many photos I brought back from the gallivants, and my mind quickly formed today’s post.  Enjoy all these from August through October 2009 and marvel at how much the harbor changes.   As I went through the archives, this is where I stopped, given the recent developments in Bella Bella BC.

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For background on this tug, check here.

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Notice also the Bayonne approach to the bridge.

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IMO 8983117 was still orange back then.

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King Philip, Thomas Dann, and Patriot Service . . .

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Odin . . .  now has a fixed profile.

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And these two clean looking machines — Coral Queen and

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John B. Caddell — were still with us.

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This is a digression to March 2010, but since I’m in a temporally warped thought, let me add this photo of the long-gone Kristin Poling.

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Back to 2009, Rosemary looked sweet here in fall scenes.

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John Reinauer . . . I wonder what that tug looks like today over in Nigeria.

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And Newtown Creek, now the deep Lady Luck of the Depths, sure looked good back then.

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And while I’m at it, I’ve finally solved a puzzle that’s bugged me for a few years.  Remember this post from three and a half years ago about a group of aging Dutch sailors who wanted to hold a reunion on their vessel but couldn’t find the boat, a former Royal Dutch Navy tug named Wamandai A870?  Well, here’s the boat today!  Well, maybe . . .

Another boat you can dive on is United Caribbean aka Golden Venture.

Photos and tangents by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are more photos from Aleksandr, taken on a canal between Middelburg and Vlissingen.    Ruurtje tows while

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F-50 takes the stern as they move

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the aluminum superstructure of a future Damen-built patrol craft on barge Risico 11.

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Click here for another view of the tow.   Click here for a view of the Damen yard there.

Aleksandr sent me these photos about a month ago.  He took them on April 20 passing Vlissingen and headed generally northward.   And I’m somewhat stumped.  What does Flintercoral look like to you?

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To me it looks like a new build, going elsewhere for completion.

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Multratug 27 takes the bow and

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Multrasalvor 3 at the stern.

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So I guess here’s the story:  it was completed as a container vessel, and although it has a Flinter- name, Flinter- never took ownership because the yard had gone bankrupt beforehand.  It seems then that some time later, the ship was purchased by Necon, and  converted into a semi-submersible.  Necon, it seems, has only this vessel.  But why it was under tow a month ago is a mystery.

My experience with Flinter is from 2009, when Flinterduin brought the Dutch sailing barges to the sixth boro, and then Flinterborg picked them up in Albany and returned them to Dutch waters.

The same day, Aleksandr caught Smit Sentosa on its arrival from a one-month passage in from Capetown.

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Many thanks to Aleksandr for these photos.  Previously his photos and drawings have appeared here.  Vlissingen (origin of the name of the NYC area called Flushing, settled in 1645) is a quite old port in Zeeland.

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