You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Netherlands’ category.

It’s really this although it looks like this.  They’re actually supposed to look like this, NOT heart-shaped.

Enough frivolity.  Be nice today and loving.

All these photos I took in Brooklyn locations in September  2009.

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Brooklyn Navy yard. . . .

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and

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Atlantic Basin.

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Some decades ago, I knew a schooner in Newburyport called Hearts Desire, but otherwise, there is a dearth of vessels with nomenclaturus valentinus.  Why?

Although bowsprite put something different up, here’s my favorite one of her past V-day posts.

For a low-emissions all-weather pilot boat, the Dutch port of Rotterdam  looked . . .  to the US.  Kvichak has built for many ports.  Fotos courtesy of Fred Trooster.

So would that be a Dutch pilot in middeck with the bare-shoulder uniform?

Sandy Hook Pilots, serving the port of New York, have gotten some of their boats, like Yankee,  just up the Sound at Derecktor Shipyards in Bridgeport.

Docking pilots travel in  . .  tugs like Laura K. Moran.

Click here for a link to vessels carrying pilots in a number of East Coast ports.  A highlight of 2011 has to be the ride on an Edison-Chouest C-Tractor, thanks to JED.

Unless otherwise credited, fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Hercules . . . (keel was laid in 1915)  has never visited the sixth boro and never will, but some rough water

she appears able to handle.  You saw Hercules on this blog a few months back burning some coal to set a towing record here.  Read the narrative here in the July portion of the log here.

The body of water in question here is between Zierikzee (marked with the red balloon with capital A) and Veere . . . on the island off to the southwest.  Also notice Rotterdam, Antwerpen, and Brugge on the map.

Speaking of Brugge, notice what they call this Brugge-registered vessel working on the Rhine?

Top two fotos used with permission from Kees (pronounced “case”) and Ingrid van Trigt;  bottom foto thanks to Patty Nolan‘s own Capt. David Williams.

Finally, tugster made the front page of the Wall Street Journal, and . . . no ATF, FBI, IRS, EPIRB . . . no handcuffs, no raincoat covering my face, no sex or financial scandal, no announcement of  an imminent run for office.  Running FROM office to pick up a copy of the paper sounds like a much better idea.  Lots of thoughts there from Cornell‘s Capt Matt Perricone there too.  See “Old Salt” Rick’s post on the article AND the upcoming 19th annual Great North River Tug Race here;  watch the video and you’ll see some of Rick’s and my footage from a previous race.

Unrelated:  This weekend tugster has dispatched me on assignment/hazardous duty at the Pageant of Steam.

In case you worried that Patty Nolan‘s figurefigure would go unrefurbished, check this out . .  and just in time for the holiday.  The 1931 vessel is updated, state-of-the-art, and decent!  More Patty soon.    If you don’t get the “figurefigure” reference, well, this is a “headless” and limbless figurehead.

If you’re really coordinated with screen controls, you can tour 1939 Hudson, the only pre-war sea tug museum in the Netherlands.

Here’s Hudson posing with Elisabeth, Netherlands 2011 tug of the year.  Click here to tour Hudson‘s engine room and see the Burmeister & Wain engine.


Ellen McAllister –that nose packs a terrific punch–rafts up with Nathan E. Stewart –now in the Pacific Northwest?–after the 2009 Hudson River tug race;  the 2011 race will happen in LESS THAN two months.

Barbara McAllister (1969, ex-Bouchard Boys, ex- T. J. Sheridan)  here pushes Bouchard No. 282 out of Port Jefferson.

And back in the sixth boro, here’sOSG Horizon and barge OSG 351 on possibly their first foray in these waters.  Assist tug is Elizabeth McAllister (1967).  Horizon is the twin of

OSG Vision.  Another of the design is planned.  Any guesses on the name?

Credits here go to David Williams, Fred Trooster, moi-meme for Ellen and Nathan, Justin Zizes, and John Watson.

And an announcement, this blog leaves on a gallivant tomorrow and may be silent for the better part of a week.  We hope to surface in Jacksonville, Miami, Key West, and Dry Totugas.    Cheers.

#1 was here.

It’s June.  Might you be suffering from hypoclupea . . .  deficiency of herring?    Read what the celebrated neurologist Oliver Sacks writes about treatment here, as published in the New Yorker two years ago.  Hypoclupea can leave you blase, bleached, apathetic . . .

dried out . . . as Miss Callie herself is feeling these days.  To see Miss Callie in her element among the fishes, click here.

Even on Coney Island, the painting near the boardwalk looks off because this siren has taken to eating . . . @#@!  dogs, and they’re not even hot.

Go fishing . . . whether you use bunker for bait and catch your own, or just

exchange cash or credit at the nearest purveyor of “new catch holland herring,”  and you’ll find your zest for life just

returns!    You might even end up seeing mermaids without having to go to the latest Depp/Disney show.

All fotos by will Van Dorp, who has lots of unrelated odds and ends and who just might not post tomorrow.

A herring-eaters blog

Translated info on the fleet at  a “loggers” festival in Vlaardingen on the Rhine this weekend.  “Logger” in Dutch is “lugger” in English.

From Uglyships’ Bart, here’s a video on an uneventful loading of  the loading of 15! tugs onto SSHLV Fjell in Singapore bound for Maracaibo via Cape Town.  Here’s a Reuters article on same.

And finally, last but not least, you’ll see a new image of “tugster” on the upper left side of this blog; click on the image and you’ll see part of an article that appeared in Jack Tar Issue #5.  Watercolor is by Herb Ascherman of Cold is the Sea blog.  Another great example of his work is cover on Jack Tar #5.

Finally, if you find yourself in Manhattan Saturday, look to the water:  I know of at least one swim around the island race going on.  New York has enthusiastic swimmers!

Happy solstice!

It’s late and the sixth boro has claimed me for a whole glorious day.  Some quick fotos, mostly from today.  Check this one out:  Sarah Ann (ex-June K) has experienced an identity crisis . .  .  her genuine orange self has begun bleeding through?

The theme here might be the seldom seen . . . like Coastline Girls, based on the south side of Raritan Bay.

Is this the same Miss Yvette as the one here three and a half years ago?

This is my first sighting for this Vane boat, Oyster Creek.

Long time no see .  . .  Yemitzis and Dorothy Elizabeth, here over south of the Outerbridge Crossing.

Buchanan 1 looked extraordinarily regal the other morning over by Owls Head.

The rare and exotic Shelby Rose passes near the salt pile.

Lois Ann L. Moran . . .  had her brights on this morning as 8:30 a.m., as some thick clouds closed in overhead.

And unrelated to the sixth boro but exciting nonetheless, Elisabeth (launched 1925) was named “tugboat of the year” (“sleepboot van het jaar”) at the National Tugboat Day 2011 in the Netherlands!  Congratulations, Maarten.   “Felicitaties!”

The last foto here by Fred Trooster;  all the others by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  For a series of the fotos on the tug (En Avant 5) that got flipped /tripped yesterday in the Netherlands, click here.  Thank, John.

The two boats here–Grouper (1912) and Elisabeth (1925) –have nothing to do with each other, but they clearly illustrate two extremes of restoration.    Elisabeth lies starboardside to in Schiedam, whereas

same is true of Grouper in Lyons, New York.

Here’s another shot of

both.

Work on Elisabeth these days entails polishing and wiping down, but on

Grouper it means studying diagrams and

tracing lines and piping and

referring to typewritten instructions from

–who knows–a half century back.

But Grouper will get there.  I invite you to weigh in on the project.  Meanwhile . . .  from the many mouths of the Rhine, Fred sends his greetings and salutes the American readers.

A final two words about Elisabeth here:  first, she’s vying for Dutch tug/pushboat (opduwer) of the year . .  . to be named during the Netherlands National Tug Day, June 2, 2011.  I’m trying to learn how/if at all non-local readers might participate.  Second, here’s Elisabeth, foto taken yesterday, National Windmill (molen) Day. to mark the completion of reconstruction of the Camel, a malt/gin mill in  Schiedam originally built in 1715.

Unrelated:  Happy Seattle Maritime Festival this weekend.  Wish I were there.  I’d be happy to post any fotos from there.

More on all these projects and events soon.  Thanks to Alen and Angela Baker for the Grouper documents and to Fred Trooster for the Elisabeth fotos.

Fred Trooster sent me these fotos a few weeks back from the province of Holland, in the land of windmills.  Not to push the “maricentric” idea too selectively, but this is truly a unique celebration of green on blue, produce on a canal system, small scale short sea shipping . . . if you will.  These fotos are from the “varend corso westland,” where varend . . . is related to the English word faring as in seafaring. Enjoy.

I’d love to see some of these parades.

Where might this happen in the US?  I don’t mean that as a rhetorical question.

Happy Earth Day.  By the way, what % of the total US energy diet comes from solar and wind at this moment?  Answer below.

All fotos thanks to Fred Trooster.  For previous fotos from Fred, click here, here, and here.

Unrelated:  mini-offering vessels float on Ganges-in-Queens.

Answer:  a miniscule 1.7%.  Read the story here.

Related:  37 “ridiculous” types of things removed from NJ beaches . . . .

http://longisland.craigslist.org/boa/2305694361.html

This blog has featured Dutch-built vessels permanently in North America before, like Livet (scroll thru a bit) and Golden Re’al.  There’s also a set of posts in September  2009 about a traditional  Dutch fleet transported to the these waters for a long month’s touristic sailing;  scroll through the “archives” on the lower leftside here to September 2009 and you’ll find a bunch, and here and here are fotos of this fleet riding Flinterborg back to Old Netherlandish waters.

Thanks to Rene Keuvelaar, here are more fotos of these American-built vessels that to this day still traffic European inland waterways, whether earning income carrying freight or spending savings gallivanting about.  Raised but unpainted lettering on the two closest hulls identify them as Muscadet (today Cordi Jan of Arnhem) and Corbieres (scrapped (?)  in 1995), hulls # 275 and 270, respectively.

Let me digress here.  Hic et Ubique was built in 1970 in the Czech Republic.  This foto was taken east of Rotterdam in 2005.  Can you guess

the cargo?  Answer follows.  Today Hic et Ubique goes by Vagrant.

Geran was Ingalls hull #276  (1951), originally known as Pomerol.  In 2005, she was shortened

by about 45′ and converted from vrachtschip (freighter)

to woonschip (houseboat).

Her original loa was just shy of 208 feet.

Ontario was hull  #277, originally called

Pontet-Canet.

Note the spare prop.

That cargo was sugar beets.  Although the US may still be the world’s leading producer, I’m not familiar with it.

Top foto from Vereniging “de Binnenvaart”  (European Inland Navigation Assocation).  All other fotos by Rene Kevelaar, used with permission.

I’d love to hear from someone familiar with Decatur, Alabama. Again, click here for some info on Ingalls Shipbuilding.  I wonder if the bunker tanker Manhasset (See 1958 here.)  I used to see in the sixth boro is the one built at Ingalls.  I know I had a foto of Manhasset, but can’t locate it.  Here’s Tom Turner’s.  Also, anyone know what has become of Manhasset and Mostank?

It’s Friday afternoon, and the Upper Bay seems congested . . .  Yano is being spun in the distance as McAllister Responder and McAllister Girls head east and Amy Moran enters the KVK.

Around the same time, here’s a shot of work in the sixth boro bookending the Yano move between my favorite cutterhead and construction at 1 WTC.

Cold, gusty Saturday the same basic area sees Taurus and Davis Sea jointly leveraging DBL 25 into a berth, and  . . .

Duncan Island heads for sea from out behind a dredge spoils scow holding station with Captain D.  Ever wonder why a reefer vessel of the Ecuadorian Line is called Duncan Island?  It’s Duncan Island aka Isla Pinzon, said to be named for the Pinzon brothers who captained the Nina and Pinta of the Columbus fleet.  Here’s a statue of the brothers, quite unknown in North America.

Most congestion as these two Moran groups cross:  left to right, Jean Turecamo, Catherine Turecamo, Scott Turecamo pushing New Hampshire, and Linda Moran pushing Houston.  Minerva Vaso lies at the dock in the distance.

At the end of this post is a video that really shows congestion, but as background, consider these two AIS screen captures, each showing about 2000 square miles.  The one below displays regularly about 100 vessels, whereas

this one .  . .  about 500 vessels.

Now enjoy as much of this 15-minute video as you have time for:  heavy traffic on Nieuwe Waterweg connecting Rotterdam with the North Sea.  Included are at least two container ships–MSC Alexandria and Maersk Edmonton– with three times the capacity of any vessels currently serving the sixth boro aka Port of New York and New Jersey.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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