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This is GHP&W 9, and since this unexpected trip to new ports has materialized, here we are.  Passing through Thimble Shoals Channel looking toward the Delmarva peninsula . . . it’s hard to capture the expanse of this bridge/tunnel.  But once inside, vessels to behold through the sudden rain include

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a noisy LCAC,

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a historically-named fishing boat,

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a Stiletto,

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and a landing craft.  Is that a pelican-shaped drone flying escort?

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Although we passed through Hampton Roads, the rain grayed out any sign of shore, where I’d been ashore four years ago.  Gold Coast was pushing a covered barge with

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seagull lookouts.

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Spring Scenery left a lot to the imagination.

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But the fleet lining the Norfolk shore was fabulous starting with USNS Lewis B Puller,

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possibly about to get a push from Tracy Moran, and

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USNS Supply,

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and Robert E. Perry.

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And much more, but for this post, we stop here.  All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday’s post led with Jared S aka Cheyenne II, and so I’m grateful to Jason LaDue for sending along a photo he took before she sank into the Genesee River, where she still lies.

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This next photo was taken by Renee Lutz Stanley, recently, as Pelham assisted the dead but lively Frying Pan to Caddell for some work.  This is my first time seeing Frying Pan away from her berth at Pier 66.  Previous posts with Frying Pan include this, this, and notably this;  in the fifth photo of the “notable” third link there, you get a little background on Frying Pan and its name, as well as see the location the lightship MIGHT have ended up at as mainstay of a North Carolina maritime museum, which would have put it much closer to Frying Pan Shoal.  Here and here are some recent posts with Pelham.

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The next five photos I took on a recent gallivant down east.  Little Toot, who works at Washburn & Doughty ( W & D) of East Boothbay, ME, appears to be a pristine-looking 1953 product of Roamer Boat company of Holland, MI.

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On the opposite side of the big blue shed at W & D is one of East Boothbay’s newest almost completed tugs, likely the JRT Moran.

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I saw Dorothy L (1965) twice while I was in the area inland from Monhegan, this time and once later but at about 0600 h and the light and motion of my ride didn’t lend itself to a good photo.

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And here are some from the sixth boro, Haggerty Girls in the notch of RTC 107, and

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And finally, a veteran . ..  it’s Freddie K Miller inside the water and

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out.  For a wide range of photos of this boat’s life, click here.

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Thanks to Jason and Renee for use of their photos.  For more of Renee’s photos of the Frying Pan move, click here.

And here, verbatim, is my call for collaboration for November posts.  Thanks to those of you who have already responded.

“And if you’re interested in collaboration, I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.”

Really random means just that . . . and here are previous posts in the series.

So–thanks to Harry Thompson– let’s start with this assemblage . . . barge Amy B, Evelyn assist on the far side, but prominent is the 1941 Bushey built Jared S–ex-Cheyenne II, Sally Carroll, and Martin J. Kehoe.

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The closest I ever got to Jared S was here . . . about a mile in from the mouth of the Genesee River in October 2014.  See the white buoy 20 feet off the bow of the decrepit Spirit of Rochester . . .  that marks the hazard created by the sinking of Jared S.

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Also thanks to Harry, here’s a repost of Ocean Queen, cropped slightly tighter than I had two weeks ago . . . but check this link for the particulars.    In that link you learn that she sank after getting rammed near Hell Gate.  Well, thanks to

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Robert Silva, here are some photos of Ocean Queen after she was raised.

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You can see exactly where a bow struck her.   Thanks, Robert.

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I took the photo below last week in Boothbay, Maine, where I checked out the Tugboat Inn.  Of course, I needed to know the story, since the superstructure here looked authentic.  All the info I collected online and from the staff there said the boat was built in 1917–probably in New York–and worked all its life until 1973 in Maine waters as the tugboat Maine.  However, nowhere could I corroborate this.

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Thanks to Dave Boone, I received the photos below and learned a different narrative that seems plausible if you carefully compare the photo above with the one below.  The Boothbay pub was once the Richard J. Moran, built at Gibbs Gas Engine in Jacksonville in 1920.  Actually, it was built in Greenport NY in 1917 as Socony 3.  Then it became Maine and still later Richard J. Moran became the name.    Thanks again to Dave Boone for the correction.

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But was Richard J.  scrapped in 1950, as these databases say, or did it get renamed Maine at that point and then get transformed into a pub in the early 1970s? To be continued.

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The rest of the photos in this post I took last week.

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In Rockland on the hard, it’s the mid-1950s Kennebec, and she’s available.

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Dimensions are 41.9′ x 12.4.’

 

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Here’s the info, but she might be sold by now.

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Thanks to Harry, Robert, and Dave for vintage photos.  All other photos by Will Van Dorp.

And if you’re interested in collaboration, I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.

Here are some photos from last year’s October breast cancer awareness campaign.

The idea of an annual breast cancer awareness month dates back to 1985.  Since at least last year, some US tugboat companies have also joined in the effort to promote mammography and all else for early detection.

I hope you are as impressed as I am.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The first photos here comes from John Jedrlinic, who took the one immediately below in Norfolk in August.  So far as I know, Julie Anne has not yet seen the sixth boro.

photo date 23 AUG 2015

I’m also not sure A. J. McAllister has seen the sixth boro.  Believe it or not, A. J. dates from 2003, built in Panama City, FL.  Jed snapped this shot as she passed USS Bulkely.  Unknowable from the Oct. 16, 2015 photo, the tight light on A. J. was attached to bulker New Spirit.

photo date 16 OCT 2015

Can you guess this one?

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It’s a nicely tidied up Quenames, New England bound.

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Charles A has been in the harbor since at least this summer.

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Coming in out of the rising sun, it’s Marie J. Turecamo and Kirby Moran.

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And headed in that direction, it’s Elizabeth McAllister.

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Now let’s size down . . .  Robbins Reef is 42.4 ‘ loa,

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Helen Paker is 39′,

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and Ava Jude is 25′ . . .

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This last photo I can’t identify, although I count at least four crew.  Photo comes thanks to Phil Little.

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Thanks to Jed and Phil for the first and last photos here;  all the others are by Will Van Dorp.

A few years ago, I did this series of posts on the 80th anniversary of the opening of the Bayonne Bridge, which I needed to shoot under to get this photo of Laura K. Moran assisting Global Laguna-probably here for scrap– around Bergen Point.

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So let’s have a look at the construction project, one of two major infrastructure upgrades in greater NYC.  The photo below shows the New Jersey side of the project,  mirror image mostly for what’s happening on the New York side.  For scale, consider that the yellow horizontal structure–a gantry–is 500′ long.

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Note the six or so support piers, 6 of what will be 26.

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Below is a closer-up of the second pier from the left in the above photo.

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And here’s still closer.  See the worker?

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Here’s the fifth pier from the left.

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Here’s about 100′ feet of the gantry.   See the worker in the boom lift, just under the support pier?

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Now you see him?

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Still see him?

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Stay tuned.  Here’s a nj.com story on the work from before this summer.

I can’t wait for the project to finish and take a walk over the new east-looking walkway.  Never again will I get photos like this and this looking westward from the bridge, though.

For photos of the other bridge project, follow Kaleidoscope Eyes. 

Here’s a link to the series.

Click anywhere on the photo below to see its provenance.  My question is .  . where and when was this photo taken?

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Here’s a closer up of the top portion of the photo.  And if you haven’t clicked on the photo above, I’ll tell you the source is a fine book by Captain Bill Eggert called Gentlemen of the Harbor.

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The image below comes from  an archived issue of Moran’s Towline magazine.  You have another chance to guess the date.  A difference here is that the photos above show the Class B boats and the one below the first two finishers of the Class A boats in this race.

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And here is the answer.  Evidence of the location of this race is in this link, where you see vintage photos of the Edgewater Ford plant, which closed in 1955 and was demolished in the late 1980s.   Click here for some unusual Ford trucks built in Edgewater and used during WW2.

Back to the International Maritime Races,  click here for info on the winner Socony 11, who came back to race 54 years later!!  Photo at the end of this post.   For career info and photos of Carol Moran, click here.

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Excuse the redundancy in the image below, also from the October 1953 issue of Towline.

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Here’s a 9/13/1953 Brooklyn Eagle p. 22 version of the race.

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Going back to the top photo, YTB-499 is still in USCG documentation, now as Marine Retriever, operating out of Coos Bay, OR.  C. Stewart Lee, originally built for the Navy as YT-134, is likely scrapped.  New York Central No. 25, disposition unknown,was built in Newburgh in 1908. Maybe someone else can add some info on what looks like Dauntless No. 2 and the boat beyond it.    And the two spectator boats?  I presume the larger one is a Circle Line vessel.

I hope I’m right about Dorothy Elizabeth being the reincarnation of Socony 11.   Unfortunately, in the photo from 2007, she was not far from the scrapper’s jaws. Click here (and scroll) to see how the same boat appeared in the movie Carlito’s Way.

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taken by Will Van Dorp, September 2, 2007

Check out Eggert’s Gentlemen of the Harbor.

 

Click here for this series.  “Fifth dimension” designates these as not contemporary, i.e., archival.

“HT” here is Harry Thompson, who sent me these photos, all from 1986.  I’m not going to say much about the photos because I don’t know much.   I was not in New York then.  I will say what I know, but please  . . . comment away.

Elise M was then a Poling boat;  now you might know her as Morgan Reinauer.

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The three identifiable boats here are all still around:  Jane McAllister is in Eastport, Dragon Lady is now Bridgeport, and Mary Turecamo is still Mary Turecamo.   Anyone know the excursion vessel and container ship out beyond?

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Here’s another of Dragon Lady.

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Dragon Lady . . . has been mentioned, Tilly has had a sad demise, and Emily S I have no info about.  There is a fourth tugboat beyond Emily S, but I can’t identify it.

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Here’s another of Tilly and an unidentified Berman vessel beyond here. Tilly was built in the Bronx.

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This is a CROWDED harbor as it’s not seen anymore.  I can’t identify anything there, but it reminds me of a hypothetical photo I’d love to see . . . Grand Erie (scroll)  was in the harbor for this centennial celebration of Lady Liberty.  Might anyone have a photo of her in the harbor for that fest?

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And we’ll end here with a mystery three-masted schooner.  Anyone identify her?

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All photos by Harry Thompson . . . and done on film.  More tomorrow, so please send in your comments now.

Sometimes I get queries about collaboration;  I really enjoy doing it like this.

Unrelated:  Here are the results of the Erie Canalway photo contest.

Following up from yesterday’s post . . . tug Chesapeake is larger, more powerful than the other Patapsco-class tugs.  It also has more windows in the wheelhouse.  In addition, the photos of Chesapeake and Susquehanna were taken in Baltimore and Savannah, resp.; not in NYC’s sixth boro as were the others.

For today I’ll start with a mystery tug, one I’ve not found any info on.

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I’d love to know more.

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Also, in Baltimore, it’s Annabelle Dorothy Moran.

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Click here to see my first shots of Annabelle almost three years ago as she sailed underneath the Brooklyn Bridge.

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And another boat I know nothing about . . . McL?

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Donal G. McAllister is Baltimore’s McAllister ex-YTB.

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New England Coast is another boat I’d never seen before . . . docked here at the Dann Marine base in Chesapeake City, MD.

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And approaching Chesapeake City from the south, it’s Calusa Coast, a frequent visitor to the sixth boro. I photographed her first here, over eight years ago.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

In the seldom-seen category, let’s start with Pegasus and Delta Fox.

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Ditto Vulcan III.

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Amy Moran light.

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How often do you see Bergen Point pushing a crane barge?

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Or Sarah Ann pushing a scow past the Hospital for Special Surgery?

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or a stern-on Larry J. Hebert from the Port of LaRose, town of the crossroads?

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James William southbound at the Statue as Indy photobombs  . . .

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and finally . . . first view for me of Sea Fox, ex-Kathleen, Doyle, Cherokee Eagle, Chris B. Boudreaux, Ledger, and Ann L.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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