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Here were some previous posts with “dawn” in the title.  I’d hoped to get photos like these on Easter Sunday, but  overcast skies obscured the sun rise color.

Sunrise this particular morning was 0643.  The photo below was at 0644.

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Quantico Creek pushes a barge eastward while Stephen Reinauer heads west.

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Curtis Reinauer westbound; Emerald Coast eastward.

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And by 0729, the light was losing some of its richness.  This is the joy of springtime light.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has left the building and the sixth boro again and asked the robots to put up the next week or so of posts.  division of labor?  I take the pics and write some commentary, and the robots do the rest.

Some people are up before dawn on Easter because of work.  But at sunrise this morning from Bard Street and looking west . . . it was gray.

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Looking east . . . dawn smudged the rosy fingers’ painting.   Lucy Reinauer pushed RTC 83 in that direction, while the Moran 6000 hp tractors returned to the barn after helping Hanjin Shenzhen out to sea and southbound.

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And the Bayonne windmill has revived its current production.  Passing it in order were JRT Moran,

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and James D.  In the distance, that’s Barney Turecamo and

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Miriam also passed.

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Caitlin Ann and

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Hunting Creek also worked their way into Easter morning.

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And I decided to get to work also.  All photos by Will Van Dorp, who did versions 1 and 2 of this in previous years.  Here was a different take on Easter.  As for Caitlin Ann’s being blue . . .

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here’s how I first saw her.

 

Many thanks to Erin Urban, executive director of Noble Maritime for those photos and information.

What’s this?

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The interior view is unique;  the exterior  . . . of course has been seen so often that your eyes might see right past it.  This beacon in the harbor has appeared in countless tugster posts, and will continue to do so.  Here’s just one. What you may not know is that in the lighthouse there is a “construction cam” focused on work at the New York Wheel.  Be sure to try “live stream cam 2” and its time lapse.  

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Below is a view of CMA CGM La Scala from a week ago, the same day the Noble Maritime crew was at the light.

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Here’s the abridged written report:

“Weather:  Cloudy, not windy, mid-60s°      Access:  The Emily Miller out; the Nicholas Miller back.  Left at 9:20; back at 12:30.

Tasks accomplished:  We brought out materials with which to clean up, including contractor’s bags, brooms, cardboard boxes, and another dustpan.  We also brought out a 60 lb. bag of mortar and water.  We added a new light in the cellar and brought out two more Mag lights and a long extension cord so we can light the cellar and any other places that need it.  We also brought out another 5-gallon can of gasoline.

André cemented the area in the cellar below the new cellar door.

Pete and Kevin got the light set up in the basement and then began the clear out.  Then, with Erin, they began removing accumulated trash and unneeded equipment.  We cleaned and cleared all the rooms, especially the second floor supply room and the stairwell, and organized a tool cabinet on the first floor.  We found a box of stuff having to do with the web camera and stored it on the fourth floor in the room where the web camera batteries are set up.

The New York Wheel worker charged up the batteries for the web camera and got it working again; it had been down since last fall.

Next steps: We will go out to do more work on the interior.   We have to shovel out the cellar, for example, and finish painting the small rooms on the fourth level.

We will at the same time do a video explaining all the aspects of the work we have to do at the lighthouse.  Our spring projects will include getting more ventilation and painting the exterior so we can set up the canopy and the solar power to light the interior and exterior of the site.”

Click here for a USCG history of aids to navigation.  Here are some 360 degrees views from Robbins Reef.

Many thanks to Erin and her crew for their work and for permission to use these photos and this report.

At the same moment, I was getting these photos of CMA CGM La Scala, with JRT Moran tailing and

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Kirby Moran made up to the lower set of recessed shell bits.

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Last two photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Random, but mostly a celebration of orange.  Click here and you’ll see how obsessive i’ve been about these juice tankers.  More even than about wine tankers, which I’ve no knowledge of ever seeing.  Milk tankers, you ask?  Well, if you mean the ones that travel from farm to processing/bottling plant, I’m familiar with them but no pics.

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Shanghai Trader came in the same day.

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Orange Sun, operated by Atlanship SA, was involved in an incident near here back in 2008.

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Stealth Berana, here with Scott Turecamo and New Hampshire lightering, seems to have undergone a name-change recently.

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Back to the juice tanker, it seems that fewer than a dozen of these vessels carry one-fourth of the world supply!

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Here’s another shot of Caroline Oldendorff with ABC-1 at stern starboard quarter and Nicholas Miller passing along port.  Go, Nicholas.

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Aleuropa is another operator of juice tankers.  Carlos Fischer is one of their vessels.

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Zim Tarragona is named for an ancient port.

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A juice tanker called Southern Juice was renamed to the last three letters of its name  “ICE” for its trip to Bangladesh breakers beach.  See the story here on p. 19/20.

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The salt bulker Aghia Skepi is named for a Greek Orthodox holy day.

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Finally, Orange Sun  . . . you’d think it would have an orange hull, like the Staten Island ferry in the background, right?

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All photos of the sixth boro activities by Will Van Dorp.

“Backing down” is a term I’ve heard used to describe a ship assist in which the tugboats control the sternwise movement of a vessel away from a dock.  Most of the work here seems to be tide current driven, if I saw it right.

Let’s pick this up at 16:28 hrs.

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The evolution waits for incoming traffic, in this case Seoul Express, which I watched getting backed down half a decade ago here and here.  Margaret Moran was involved that time as well.

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At 16:49, Seoul Express, accompanied by Kirby Moran, is passing and Margaret throttles up, catching

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the attention of a crew member on the superstructure of Seoul Express.

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By 16:51, Heina is well away from the dock, and now

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James D.Moran needs to get the stern out, but I’m not well placed to capture that.

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Margaret moves around to the bulb.  I love how the load markings mimic the tug profile.

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By 16:58, Heina is at least two ship lengths east of the salt dock, and

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by 17:07, Heina has begun to rotate counterclockwise in preparation to head under the VZ Bridge out to sea.  By now, she’s south of the Bahamas.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, to whose untrained eyes this all seemed to evolve with masterful control.

As to the meaning of “heina,” try this.

If you have a lot of free time, you can trace this back to the first installment.

These photos are all from the past week, starting out with Bouchard Boys, 1975.

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Pelham, 1960.  Behind her is USNS Red Cloud.

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Barney Turecamo (1995) and

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Scott Turecamo (1998).

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Eric R. Thornton (1960)

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Jill Reinauer (1967) and Dace Reinauer (1968) with RTC 61.

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Add Stephen-Scott (1967) and Ruth M. Reinauer (2008) pushing RTC 102.

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Margaret Moran (1979) starting a backing-down of Heina with

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James D. Moran (2015).  More on this backing down later this week.

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Captain D (1974) with CVA-604.

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Meagan Ann (1975)

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Houma (1970).

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Frances (1957) and I think I know the crewman forward of the house.

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And finally, I put this photo here because of a boat in the background.  Is that Kristy Ann Reinauer (1962)?  I thought she was scrapped half a year ago already.  Hmm.

Other boats here are L. to r.) Realist, Kristy Ann, Hubert Bays, Long Splice, Samantha Miller, Stephen B, and Hunt Girls, which has been in the yard there for (?) two years now?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Prayers for and condolences to families/friends of Specialist crew.  Here’s a photo I took of the boat back in 2007.

 

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Here was Janet D pushing crane barge Jared Walter the other day.

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Another crane barge, this one pushed by Quenames, which I never seen pushing anything but a petroleum barge.

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Tugboat Sassafras moving Doubleskin 30 into IMTT, and then going over to Brooklyn light.

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And finally, it’s Harry McNeal and Miss Julia  . .. again moving crane barges.

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Last one for today . . . it’s JRT Moran, and those do not look like deckhands on the bow.  I’m just wondering.

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The container ship being assisted is Northern Justice.

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No matter what you do, be careful out there.  Here’s the latest USCG report I could find.

Here and here are previous posts in this spirit, but first, the answer to yesterday’s bridge identification question . . . Joseph Chomicz nailed it . . . it’s Outerbridge Crossing, named for a person of commerce.

Today’s question is:  as you look through the photos in this post, can you think of a type of cargo that seems to be missing in the sixth boro in recent months?

In the photo of the self-unloader below, Outerbridge Crossing is seen from the south side, not from directly below.

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Although the light is not ideal in the photo below, this is the stern of the self-unloader Caroline Oldendorff, poised to auger salt off to a pile between the oil tanks.

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I like the effect of the flag in front of the spare wheel.  I last saw Caroline on the Mississippi here.

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Here’s an unusual tugster perspective . . . Eagle Madrid leaving the south end of the AK, passing Perth Amboy and

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snaking through the channel across Raritan Bay;  that’s Brooklyn in the background to the right.

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Here’s another unusual tugster perspective . . . Sea Halcyone (formerly Unique Sunshine) passing Shooters Island as seen from Faber Park.

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Note Margaret Moran assisting to port, and a (mothballed??) Liberty IV still on the hard to the left, and several raucous gull drones doing some pilotage.  Maybe?

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Here JPO Pisces gets overtaken by Tangier Island before

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passing MSC Katya R, who’s

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seen in by JRT Moran.

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Heina, although no self-unloader, is discharging the same cargo as Caroline Oldendorff had in her holds:  salt.

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So which cargo seems to be missing . . . in recent months?  My perception is orange juice, my favorite drink.  Have I just been missing the ships, or is there a change in the supply chain?

Again, congrats to Joseph for naming the bridge in yesterday’s post.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

. . . upon.  That’s what happened when I was just minding my own business the other day . . . and a voice calls my name and “Be careful.  I could have thrown you to the fishes,” he said, before showing this photo below.

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Getting USNS Red Cloud,  Helen Laraway, Andrea, and Sea Wolf into a single frame had been my aim just seconds before.

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No matter.  Here goes Lucy Reinauer pushing RTC 83.

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I think Stephen-Scott was headed for a barge out beyond Gulf Service with GM11103.

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What I found was Bluefin and

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Morgan Reinauer and

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Amberjack and

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Scott Turecamo with barge New Hampshire.  And more.

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And maybe getting kept upon and thrown to the fishes . . . might just work out alright, although watch out for shadowy characters like the lurker over there.

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It made me think about a day a mere 100 or so days from now when photographers photographing get photographed themselves.

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Happy leap day.

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Here’s what I put up last leap year.

All photographs here–except the obvious two–by Will Van Dorp.

 

What can you tell about this vessel?  Here’s a clue . . . try to give it at least 30 seconds of a listen.

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Here’s a bit more of her.  Actually, I’d love to get a fast rescue craft to explore harbors with . . .  Anyone know of a online marketplace for used FRCs?  Norsafe is a leading manufacturer, and their site introduced me to a new term, daughter craft.    But I digress.

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The sixth boro can be quite crowded sometimes.  Like here, how many large vessels do you count?

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From left to right, there’s Red Cloud, STI Fulham, Maersk Weymouth, Opal Express, Anthem of the Seas, and Leopard Sea, with an unidentified tug and barge unit along Opal Express port side;  and when I move the camera to the right, there also Zircon, with Sunny Williams delivering lube oil and I can’t identify the tug bunkering.

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Still farther to the right, there’s Marie Kirk, Irish Sea, and an unidentified fishing boat her the CNJRR station.

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A bit earlier, I caught this photo of Kirby Moran escorting STI Fulham out of the “inner harbor” to the anchorage.

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Over by the salt pile and deeply laden with ice remover . . .

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it’s Arcturus, newly arrived from the Antofagasta region, waiting to be discharged.

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Which returns us to the mystery ship at the top of this post.  It’s Carmen.  WW has named many of its PCTCs after characters from operas.

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Click here and here for more of these WW vessels. That’s either Miriam or Margaret Moran seeing Carmen in.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

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