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“Backing down” is a term I’ve heard used to describe a ship assist in which the tugboats control the sternwise movement of a vessel away from a dock.  Most of the work here seems to be tide current driven, if I saw it right.

Let’s pick this up at 16:28 hrs.

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The evolution waits for incoming traffic, in this case Seoul Express, which I watched getting backed down half a decade ago here and here.  Margaret Moran was involved that time as well.

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At 16:49, Seoul Express, accompanied by Kirby Moran, is passing and Margaret throttles up, catching

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the attention of a crew member on the superstructure of Seoul Express.

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By 16:51, Heina is well away from the dock, and now

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James D.Moran needs to get the stern out, but I’m not well placed to capture that.

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Margaret moves around to the bulb.  I love how the load markings mimic the tug profile.

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By 16:58, Heina is at least two ship lengths east of the salt dock, and

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by 17:07, Heina has begun to rotate counterclockwise in preparation to head under the VZ Bridge out to sea.  By now, she’s south of the Bahamas.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, to whose untrained eyes this all seemed to evolve with masterful control.

As to the meaning of “heina,” try this.

If you have a lot of free time, you can trace this back to the first installment.

These photos are all from the past week, starting out with Bouchard Boys, 1975.

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Pelham, 1960.  Behind her is USNS Red Cloud.

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Barney Turecamo (1995) and

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Scott Turecamo (1998).

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Eric R. Thornton (1960)

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Jill Reinauer (1967) and Dace Reinauer (1968) with RTC 61.

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Add Stephen-Scott (1967) and Ruth M. Reinauer (2008) pushing RTC 102.

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Margaret Moran (1979) starting a backing-down of Heina with

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James D. Moran (2015).  More on this backing down later this week.

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Captain D (1974) with CVA-604.

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Meagan Ann (1975)

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Houma (1970).

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Frances (1957) and I think I know the crewman forward of the house.

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And finally, I put this photo here because of a boat in the background.  Is that Kristy Ann Reinauer (1962)?  I thought she was scrapped half a year ago already.  Hmm.

Other boats here are L. to r.) Realist, Kristy Ann, Hubert Bays, Long Splice, Samantha Miller, Stephen B, and Hunt Girls, which has been in the yard there for (?) two years now?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Prayers for and condolences to families/friends of Specialist crew.  Here’s a photo I took of the boat back in 2007.

 

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Here was Janet D pushing crane barge Jared Walter the other day.

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Another crane barge, this one pushed by Quenames, which I never seen pushing anything but a petroleum barge.

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Tugboat Sassafras moving Doubleskin 30 into IMTT, and then going over to Brooklyn light.

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And finally, it’s Harry McNeal and Miss Julia  . .. again moving crane barges.

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Last one for today . . . it’s JRT Moran, and those do not look like deckhands on the bow.  I’m just wondering.

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The container ship being assisted is Northern Justice.

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No matter what you do, be careful out there.  Here’s the latest USCG report I could find.

Here and here are previous posts in this spirit, but first, the answer to yesterday’s bridge identification question . . . Joseph Chomicz nailed it . . . it’s Outerbridge Crossing, named for a person of commerce.

Today’s question is:  as you look through the photos in this post, can you think of a type of cargo that seems to be missing in the sixth boro in recent months?

In the photo of the self-unloader below, Outerbridge Crossing is seen from the south side, not from directly below.

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Although the light is not ideal in the photo below, this is the stern of the self-unloader Caroline Oldendorff, poised to auger salt off to a pile between the oil tanks.

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I like the effect of the flag in front of the spare wheel.  I last saw Caroline on the Mississippi here.

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Here’s an unusual tugster perspective . . . Eagle Madrid leaving the south end of the AK, passing Perth Amboy and

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snaking through the channel across Raritan Bay;  that’s Brooklyn in the background to the right.

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Here’s another unusual tugster perspective . . . Sea Halcyone (formerly Unique Sunshine) passing Shooters Island as seen from Faber Park.

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Note Margaret Moran assisting to port, and a (mothballed??) Liberty IV still on the hard to the left, and several raucous gull drones doing some pilotage.  Maybe?

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Here JPO Pisces gets overtaken by Tangier Island before

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passing MSC Katya R, who’s

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seen in by JRT Moran.

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Heina, although no self-unloader, is discharging the same cargo as Caroline Oldendorff had in her holds:  salt.

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So which cargo seems to be missing . . . in recent months?  My perception is orange juice, my favorite drink.  Have I just been missing the ships, or is there a change in the supply chain?

Again, congrats to Joseph for naming the bridge in yesterday’s post.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

. . . upon.  That’s what happened when I was just minding my own business the other day . . . and a voice calls my name and “Be careful.  I could have thrown you to the fishes,” he said, before showing this photo below.

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Getting USNS Red Cloud,  Helen Laraway, Andrea, and Sea Wolf into a single frame had been my aim just seconds before.

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No matter.  Here goes Lucy Reinauer pushing RTC 83.

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I think Stephen-Scott was headed for a barge out beyond Gulf Service with GM11103.

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What I found was Bluefin and

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Morgan Reinauer and

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Amberjack and

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Scott Turecamo with barge New Hampshire.  And more.

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And maybe getting kept upon and thrown to the fishes . . . might just work out alright, although watch out for shadowy characters like the lurker over there.

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It made me think about a day a mere 100 or so days from now when photographers photographing get photographed themselves.

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Happy leap day.

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Here’s what I put up last leap year.

All photographs here–except the obvious two–by Will Van Dorp.

 

What can you tell about this vessel?  Here’s a clue . . . try to give it at least 30 seconds of a listen.

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Here’s a bit more of her.  Actually, I’d love to get a fast rescue craft to explore harbors with . . .  Anyone know of a online marketplace for used FRCs?  Norsafe is a leading manufacturer, and their site introduced me to a new term, daughter craft.    But I digress.

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The sixth boro can be quite crowded sometimes.  Like here, how many large vessels do you count?

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From left to right, there’s Red Cloud, STI Fulham, Maersk Weymouth, Opal Express, Anthem of the Seas, and Leopard Sea, with an unidentified tug and barge unit along Opal Express port side;  and when I move the camera to the right, there also Zircon, with Sunny Williams delivering lube oil and I can’t identify the tug bunkering.

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Still farther to the right, there’s Marie Kirk, Irish Sea, and an unidentified fishing boat her the CNJRR station.

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A bit earlier, I caught this photo of Kirby Moran escorting STI Fulham out of the “inner harbor” to the anchorage.

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Over by the salt pile and deeply laden with ice remover . . .

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it’s Arcturus, newly arrived from the Antofagasta region, waiting to be discharged.

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Which returns us to the mystery ship at the top of this post.  It’s Carmen.  WW has named many of its PCTCs after characters from operas.

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Click here and here for more of these WW vessels. That’s either Miriam or Margaret Moran seeing Carmen in.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Count the containers across . . .  I see nine.  And the width of a standard container is . . . ?

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This container is beamier than the tug alongside, but by a factor of less than three.  Guesses?

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Since the beginning of 2016, Frisia Inn, which I consider a very strange name unless I’m missing an insider’s story, has called at ports in the US as well as a few in the Caribbean.

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Her dimensions are 482′ x 75.’   A standard container is 8′ wide.

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It’s port-appropriate size.  Its 2016 ports of call outside the US have been St. Maarten, Trinidad, and Dominican Republic, with populations of 75,000;  1.3 million; and 10.4 million, respectively.

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And the UCC stands for ??

Here’s the answer.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

First, my take on the identification of the tug from the film in yesterday’s post, it’s a model and filmed in New Deal Studios in LA.    That would explain the logistics.

So, for today, let’s start with Miss Katie . . . outbound last Thursday.

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Miss Katie, 1998

 

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Mister T, 2001

 

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Ruth M. Reinauer, 2008, pushing RTC 102

 

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Discovery Coast, 2012

 

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Kirby Moran, 2015, assisting STI Fulham

 

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JRT Moran, 2015

 

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McAllister Girls, 1968, moving B. No. 231

 

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Amy C McAllister, 1975, also assisting B. No. 231

 

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Brian Nicholas, 1966.   Sturgeon Bay, 1987

 

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Eric McAllister, 2014, passing NYK Nebula

 

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Irish Sea, 1969

 

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James D. Moran, 2015, assisting NYK Nebula

And finally, we return to Miss Katie because two days later, she caught some unwanted attention.  Details here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts in this series.

When I saw a parade of Moran tugs heading to meet a ship or some ships, I suspected something large was coming.

And when she appeared around the bend, she did look quite large,

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Cosco Napoli did, and much as I wanted to keep my hands in my pockets, I took the photos I could.

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Kirby Moran (6000 hp) assisted.  I’m not sure if Margaret Moran (3000 hp)–to starboard–was assisting also.

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and JRT Moran (6000 hp) was back there . . .

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That’s a total of 15,000 tugboat hp, i.e., 11,185 kW, I believe.  Cosco Napoli‘s engine is rated at 69,620 kW, which converts to 93,362 hp, if I used the correct horsepower conversion, and I know how complicated the “horsepower” is.

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So, for some more numbers:  Cosco Napoli, capacity of 8000+  teu.  1099′ loa x 137′ x 45′

Comparing this container vessel to the largest one recently arrived in Oakland and Long Beach, CMA CGM Ben Franklin is 63,910 kW, 18,000+ teu, and 1309′ x 177′ x 37.’

Here’s another comparison, CSCL Indian Ocean recently grounded on the Elbe . . . her numbers look like this:  69,720 kW, 19,000+ teu, and 1311′ x 192′ x  39.’

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Click here for the previous posts in this series.  It’s good for me to revisit past posts because then I can locate and correct some errors, like having two “2”s in this series, now corrected.  I also notice that i’ve learned a thing or two about a thing or two.  Like, technically, the color is not “maroon” but “signal red.”  Or is it?  Maybe only model makers call it that? I’m also happy about the people I’ve met along the way who helped me learn these things and who sometimes send along photos.  All photos today were taken a bit south of the sixth boro and come from frequent contributor Jed Jedrlinic.

Jed took all these photos around Norfolk a few years back on the dates shown, but let me arrange the boats in the order of manufacture.

Patricia Moran was built in 1962 but then saw a major redesign and rebuilt in 1999;  it was the 4th of the MORtrac class. The only photo I’ve found of her pre-1999 is here . . .  on page 3.

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

I don’t mean to be critical, but the modern wheelhouse/rest of the house marriage here looks . . .  transitional to my 2016 eyes.

PATRICIA MORAN

Marci Moran launched in 1999, the first Moran tractor  built at Washburn & Doughty  (W & D).

photo date 5 OCT 2010

photo date 5 OCT 2010

Karen Moran, 2000, the 2nd W & D tractor.

photo date 2 JULY 2010

photo date 2 JULY 2010

 

photo date 2 JULY 2010

photo date 2 JULY 2010

Tracy Moran, 2000, already the 4th W & D tractor.

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

 

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

Kaye E Moran, 2003, the 8th W & D tractor.

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

 

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

 

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

April Moran, 2006, the 12th W & D tractor.

photo date 9 MARCH 2011

photo date 9 MARCH 2011

 

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

And finally, one of my photos, JRT Moran is the most recent–so far–and 29th W & D tractor for Moran. She’s barely seen here, but in the background are Kirby Moran–27th, and James D. Moran–28th by  . . . W & D.  Rhat’s also the ATB Linda Moran in the way background.

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All photos credited to John Jedrlinic, except the last one, which was taken by Will Van Dorp.

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