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Ten days ago I put up a post about multiple load lines on a Torm tanker, and I appreciate that many of you weighed in here and on FB.

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Here’s an explanation of load lines I found online.

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When I saw another Torm tanker leaving today, I thought I’d check.

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And sure enough, this one too had three sets of load lines, although I understand that only the one painted is the valid one.

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Neches dates from 2000, and Mary from 2002.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a detail I noticed recently that I truly do not understand.  There are three sets of load lines.  does this mean that significant changes have been made to the vessel such that greater load–deepest draft marks here seem to be the current ones–is now legal?  The tanker is 16 years old.

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Thanks.  Photo by Will Van Dorp.

Well well well . . . the paint confused me here, until

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I gt the name board . . . Mister Jim working while transforming.  Click here for a winter photo of Mister Jim.

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Weddell Sea I’ve not seen in a while. And her barge looks to be undergoing a paint change as well.

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Here’s my first glance close up of the stack of

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Barry Silverton.

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Silverton appears to belong to a different fleet than the Harley tugs that’ve been here for almost 10 years, like HMS St. Andrews.

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Brendan Turecamo here is rushing past CMA CGM Corneille to assist from starboard.  Here’s a Brendan Turecamo photo from almost 10 years ago.   Here’s more on CMA CGM Corneille, and if you want a refresher on who Pierre Corneille was, click here.  Recently the sixth bork has seen other c-ships named for writers like Herman Hesse and Ernest Hemingway.

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Closing this post out . . .it’s Jonathan C Moran, moving a tanker out.  More on this tanker soon.  But

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my photo below shows Jonathan C Moran on her christening day, less than two months ago.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Type the word training into the search window to the left on this page and you’ll get a variety of posts, as here.  And truth be told, many other options exist for summer training and sea time for ocean academy students;  I met cadets from at least three on my “go west” trip.  Yesterday David Silver got me advance notice of when this training ship would leave port;  thanks to him, I got these photos.

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Kimberly Turecamo assisted, as did Julia Miller and Amy C McAllister.

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By 1230 Friday, she was west of the Brooklyn Bridge and headed for sea,

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for Maine, and by

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this posting, she’s already east of Cape Cod.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here to watch David Silver’s 20-minute video of her departure from pier side.

 

I’m reprising this from Troy, and it’s Lisa Ann.  I believe she’s 2012 built.

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Governor Roosevelt is almost a century older, and wears 1928 on her name board now. This is Marcy NY, an Oneida County town between Utica and Rome.

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Also at Lock E20, here’s a clutch of boats and floats including BB152, an unidentified and in the process of being repainted tender, a dredge barge, and BB 142.

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Tug Erie is there too. Anyone know when tug Erie was built?

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Farther along is 1932 tug Seneca, formerly of the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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Inside the H. Lee White Maritime Museum in Oswego, here’s a model of a Catherine Moran.

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Here’s what the label said, but according to birk’s site, she’s still alive and well under the assumed name of  Sherry D.   Anyone have photos of Sherry D out in the SF Bay area?

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On the freshwater sea called Lake Ontario, it’s another tugboat from 1928, Karl E. Luedtke.

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Tucked away in Silo City of Buffalo, it’s Daniel Joncaire II, about a year old.

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In the Outer Harbor of Cleveland, it’s 1954 Duluth and fleet mate

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1956 William C. Gaynor.

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And here approaching the south end of the Detroit river, it’s 1982 tug Michigan pushing barge Great Lakes.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Summertime and the living is easy . . . and Sassafras is bringing fuel to MSC Marianna.

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JRT Moran is preparing to assist MSC Busan out of its berth

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Another section of Rockefeller University’s River Campus is shipping in aboard Witte 1401 moved by Emily Ann, 

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passing Zachery and Jason Reinauer and

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and Dean.

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Crystal Cutler moves Patricia E. Poling westbound . . .

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Brendan Turecamo assists MSC Busan back out

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on its way

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to Norfolk.

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All photos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp, who is leaving the area for a while.  Details tomorrow.

 

Is it Jonathan C Moran, which arrived in the sixth boro at some point in the past month?

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It was.

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Actually, as of now, it IS Jack T Moran, which arrived via the East River

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yesterday afternoon, and will be christened along with Jonathan C, in a double ceremony at noon today.

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More soon.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I should use this title more often, given the frequent renewal of robust industry in the sixth boro of NYC, but here is the previous usage.

Given the history and range of projects of Elsbeth II, you might imagine how thrilled I was to see her for the first time yesterday.  And she has to be among a small set of working vessels based in North America with brightwork!  She truly fits under the category exotic.

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I saw this tugboat six years ago in the Delaware River, but Sarah D looks spanking new  in NYS Marine Highway colors.

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Happy flag day.  Do you know the significance of this date?

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OSG Courageous, she’s one large tugboat and an infrequent

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visitor in this port.  I can’t quite make out the barge name. Of course, she’s not as colossal as her big sister –OSG Vision–who spent some time here . . . four (!!) years ago.

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Sassafras is a fixture in the sixth boro, but she rarely looks as good as she does when many shore dwellers in the other boros are just waking up.  Here she

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lies alongside Petali Lady.

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Mister Jim here is lightering (?) bulker Antigoni B, who seems to have since headed upriver.

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And since this is called random tugs, let me throw in two photos from the Digital collections of the New york State archives . . . SS Brazil entering the sixth boro on May 31, 1951.  What the photo makes very clear to me is how much traffic in the harbor has changed in 65 years.   Can anyone identify the six tugboats from at least three different companies here?  I can’t.

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Here the party passes a quite different looking Governors Island.

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All photos except for the last two by Will Van Dorp.  These last two come from a treasure trove aka Digital Collections of the New York State Archives. 

Unrelated:  If you’re free Saturday, it’s the annual mermaid migration on Coney Island.

 

Paris this springtime has seen new waterfronts, quite miserable for anyone wedded to the old margins.  Click on the image to read the story.

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But I’m not focusing here on “paris,” but rather “pairs” that have been “pairing” around the sixth boro.  And that appears to be Flinterland over beyond the warehouses just arrived from Paramaribo.   Both Paris and Paramaribo are on my list of “gotta got there soon” places.  In the foreground and eastbound on the East River, it’s Foxy 3 and Rae.

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I caught Marie J Turecamo and Mary Turecamo doing the do-see-doe allemand left recently just off Caddell.

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The background margins seemed to be trying to add a script.

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With the Turecamos, the background served as a record of change on the Bayonne Bridge.

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And Mary appears to have just had a makeover.

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And what’s this on the margin of the sixth boro and Brooklyn . .  other than a surplus military vessel in the Navy yard?  Here’s a previous allusion to IX-514.

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Are there pairs in those boxes?  Yes, I know these are the flocks of pigeons that are said to create art when they fly.  Here though in daylight they look like Joseph Perkins boxes with living creatures in them, mimicking a microcosm of the residents of NYC.

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But I’ve somehow gotten myself off topic, but no matter, it’s springtime.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who took a break from catfishing and stumbled onto an answer thanks to the site naturalareasnyc.org.  According to them, NYC includes over 76,000 acres of open water, i.e., the sixth boro.  That number of acres converts to about 119 square miles (mi2).  Manhattan, in comparison is only 23 mi2.

Here are the other land boros’ areas:

Bronx, 42 mi2

Staten Island,  58 mi2

Brooklyn, 71 mi2

Queens, 109 mi2

And size matters.  It’s time for the 119-acre-boro to have its own official name and status.

OK, I’ll hand this back to the robots and reel in my catfish.

We’ve seen James D., Kirby, and JRT.  And now . .  welcome Jonathan C Moran.  Another photo of the 6000 hp newest in the port later in the post.

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For now, also resplendent in the June dawn . . . Jane A. Bouchard,

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the unique B. Franklin Reinauer,

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and so let’s add another of this facet tug,

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Evening Light (the former Frederick E. ), 

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the lean, green James E. Brown, 

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the age-defying Durham,

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the indefatigable James Turecamo,

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and finally another shot of Jonathan C Moran.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who needs to get back to work.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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