You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘McKeil Marine’ category.

If my post-entitling were consistent, this would be the twelfth post with pics from Mike.  Of course, if it were differently consistent, this would be Lois M 4.   Yes, 4 because of this post which would be Thanks to Jake . . . and a number. OK, I’ll stop with all the meta-commentary.

Nevertheless, Lois M is still in town, hibernating  . . .  you might say,  waiting not so much for spring as for completion of the work on her barge.

To highlight her size . . .  she ‘s 108′ x 35′ x 18’ and propelled by 4800 hp.

To quote the GLtugs site, she’s a “z-drive tug was built in 1991 by Matsuura Tekko Zosen of Higashino, Japan as the Lambert for Cleveland Cliffs-Robe River Iron in Australia.”

Note the WTC 1 beyond the stern deck and

the Empire State Building and Williamsburg Bridge beyond her here.

Many thanks, Mike.

 

 

Guess the vessel cut off to the right?

The tug is Lois M, on hold in Brooklyn for about a month already.

It turns out she came to GMD with barge Tobias for a haircut and a shave, and maybe some new paint.

After the shipyard work, Lois M and Tobias might be headed across the pond ….

Given the size of the graving dock, Tobias is a huge barge.

Many thanks to Mike Abegg for these photos.

And that bowsprit . . . it belongs to Clipper City.

An unusual profile sailed into the Narrows recently, and what I read says she’s powered by Niigata engines.  Anyone know much about these engines?  The company also builds railroad equipment.

I assumed she’d be in under cover of darkness, but towing a 400′ x 100′ deck barge, she made slow time along the south side of Long Island.

I’m not sure I understand the impact of cold on my camera, but I got these photos from more than half a mile off.

After towing barge Tobias in on the wire, she rounded up in Stapleton and made up alongside.  Eventually, she got assistance and brought the barge into the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

 

For more info on Lois M, check here out here and here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Still in Cleveland, a recalcitrant fisherman keeps anchor and hooks wet until Huron Spirit threatens to immerse the fisherman as well.

Smarter heads prevail and the fishermen move out of the immediate danger.

 

Sarah Andrie and her A-390 have discharged in Tonowanda and are

 

upbound for Lake Michigan.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous installments in the series.  Summer sail can take the form of foil-raised GP racing as will happen in the sixth boro this weekend;  it can also happen on longer courses and require stamina and endurance as happens in some races ending in Mackinac.

All the photos in this post come from Jeff Gritsavage, as he was delivering a yacht from Florida to Lake Michigan.  Some of you will recognize that this shot was taken in an Erie Canal lock.  A few of you will name the lock.  Answer at the end of this post.

I’ll help you out here; this was taken on the Oswego Canal, a spur that was developed to connect the Erie Canal and Syracuse to Lake Ontario.  Name the town?

Another town on the Oswego Canal.  Name it?

This is the same town, and the boats are exiting the same lock as seen above.  In fact, about 500′ beyond the opening mitre gates is the location I took this photo of Urger and a State Police cruiser almost exactly 5 years ago.

This is Oswego.  White Hawk has arrived on its first Great Lake.  The masts await and will be stepped because air draft issues

no longer apply.

Welland Canal is less than 30 miles long, but it’s

 

the way around Niagara Falls in 8 easy steps.

Coexistence with larger vessels is the rule on the Welland Canal.

Above and below is one of the hardest working tug/barge units on the lakes . . . Wilf Seymour and Alouette Spirit

And on any lucky passage through the Welland, you’ll see vessels like Fednav‘s Federal Dee,

Polsteam‘s Mamry, and

Canada Steamship LinesCSL Tadoussac.

Before I give the answers to the questions above, here’s another town/Erie Canal location to identify.  Click on the photo to find its attribution AND the article that explains what’s happening with White Hawk.

So . . . the answers are lock E-23, Phoenix NY, Fulton NY, and finally above . . . .

 

that’s Rome.   Click here for a previous tugster post on the Rome to Oswego run.

Many thanks to Capt. Jeff for sharing these photos here.

And I’ll be looking for White Hawk on the Lakes this summer.

 

 

No, it has nothing to do with dance, but refers to my bird guide which calls “exotic” anything appearing outside of its usual habitat.  Here are the previous exotics posts.

These photos were all taken by Mike Abegg in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

It’s Beverly M I, a McKeil tug.  I quote from the site linked:  “built in 1993 by Imamura Shipbuilding of Japan as the Shek O for Hong Kong Towing and Salvage.”  Remember, Canada has no Jones Act-type origin rules.

 

 

A tug registered in St. John’s . . .  I’d call that exotic.  Anyone know the story?  Since it delivered a barge that went into the graving dock, I’m guessing it was an emergency repair.

I’ve seen her fleet mate–Sharon M I— several times on the Great Lakes.

Many thanks to Mike for getting these photos.  Click here to see his previous catches.

 

“irrespective of operating conditions, all vessels must be clear of the Montreal-Lake Ontario section [of the St. Lawrence Seaway]  at 12:00 hours on December 31st, [2017].” quoted from Seaway Notice No. 26–2017

Above and below, Leonard M and Ocean A. Simard struggling to extricate Federal Biscay, as seen from Robinson Bay, on January 6, in temperatures double digits below zero, Fahrenheit.

Yet, here we are as of earlier this morning in the areas east and west of the Snell Lock [between groups 3 and 4].  Green AIS symbols are ships, all down bound, and aqua are tugs, assisting in that effort.   Key follows.  Check this news update from Massena NY on boatyard.com for January 8.

1  Pacific Huron.  It had grounded farther upstream in late December.

2  Performance and Robinson Bay

3  Federal Biscay and Ocean A. Simard.  Federal Biscay precipitated this delay, when it got stuck in Snell Lock last week.  It was freed Saturday. 

4  Billeborg, Beatrix, and Mitiq

5  Ocean Tundra and Martha L. Black

This should make for interesting story to follow on AIS or on FB group St. Lawrence River Ship Watchers.

Leo Ryan’s Maritime Magazine comments on the gold-headed cane ceremony each January in Montreal honoring the first ship into port of Montreal each year.  There should be a similar “recognition” of the last ship out of the Seaway.  Name suggestions, anyone?  Definitely there should be recognition of the efforts of the tug and ice breakers crews ensuring that the last ship gets out.  For some reason, I recall a kid’s book . . . The Story About Ping.

Many thanks to Nathan Jarvis for the top two photos and assistance with information.  The photo below I’m not sure who to credit to, but it shows Robinson Bay‘s efforts to extricate Federal Biscay last week.

And as of 10:54 today…

Federal Biscay and Pacific Huron are competing to be Ping;  the others are downstream following Black and Tundra.

Port Weller is the north terminus of the Welland Canal, and as such, sees either a pilot boarding or debarking, which was the case here. Mrs C has an equally attractive fleet mate at Port Colbourne, the southern terminus. The vessel in the background left will appear in an upcoming post.

Some 80 miles to the east Kimberly Anne (1965) was docked in Rochester’s Charlotte port.

Walking along the beach there, I saw this historical sign of tug Oneida and schooner H. M. Ballou, at different times both owned by a George W. Ruggles.

Fifty or so miles to the NE we enter the Oswego River to find the busiest (IMHO) unit on the lakes:  in the past few years I’ve seen Wilf Seymour and Alouette Spirit at least 6 times between Lake Huron and Quebec City.   Here’s more info on Alouette’s aluminum operations, at one time and possibly now the largest aluminum producer in the Americas.

 

Click here for more info on Novelis, the client here in Oswego.

 

Anyone tell me the weight of one of these ingots?

Moving from contemporary to retrospective, the Phoenix dock was hosting schooner Lois McClure and tug Churchill as we passed.

For more close-ups, check out tug44’s take. 

Click here for a complete history of the replica schooner Lois McClure.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes you all enjoy the last day of summer 2017 today.

 

Contining here, I am, from Detroit to Cleveland.

Demolen at the USACE dock near the Rouge,

Stormont pushing the ferry barge

in the direction of RenCen,

Victory moving James L. Kuber

past Fighting Island, and

Leonard M remakes the tow

that’s heaped up with coal,

and I get to watch it all.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a new look in ship-assist boats.  Can you tell what else is unconventional?

More on the design later in the post.

This is a classic design in freshwater tugs.  And this particular boat you’ve seen in a number of posts on this blog in 2016, if you’re a faithful reader.  It’s in these.

I’ve never seen Grouper‘s hull out of the water–and I hope to some day–but I’m imagining it’s fairly similar.

It’s GL tug Nebraska, 1929 launched, still working in Toledo, and in the yard only for preventative maintenance.   Over in the distance, that’s Maine, nearing the century mark and likely to be scrapped soon. Here’s an entire page with links devoted to GL tugs ….

You’ve seen this design before:  Cheraw is a YTB of the vintage of tugs like the sixth boro’s Ellen McAllister, but in the livery of the USACE.  I don’t know if USACE operates any other ex-YTBs among their very large fleet.

And in closing this post, here’s Seahound, 1941 built in the US and since 1957 working in Canada.  Since these shots show her at a dock in Windsor and pushing a barge marked . .  .

ferry service, I’m left wondering if Seahound shuttles vehicles between here and Detroit.  Anyone help?  And I know better than to take any names literally, but given her location, she might better be called Straithound?

So to get back to the top two photos . . . that’s Cleveland, the prototype for a new series of  harbor assist tugs built in Cleveland using a Damen design.  And what you may have noticed is the absence of a stack.  Engines exhaust through the stern.  Much more in this article from Professional Mariner here.   Here’s more from the Damen site.  Here are other links showing the environment where GL tugs operate while assisting cargo vessels in Cleveland.

All photos, sentiments, and any inadvertent errors by Will Van Dorp, who’s grateful to Great Lakes Shipyard for the tour.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,339 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

March 2020
M T W T F S S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031