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It turns out, I’ve done a post like this once before . . .  in 2012 here.  When I took the next two photos on Tuesday, I’d thought all the fleet week vessels had already departed.  Well, wrong . . . there went LHD-3 USS Kearsarge . . .

which reminded me this would be

a good time to use a photo by a jolly tar back about 10 years ago.  Notice the long-gone, long transformed Odin bunkering LHD-3….

Mid afternoon Tuesday this was a sight to behold along the East River, here approaching the Williamsburg Bridge . . . whatzit?

It’s another of the fleet leaving town . . . USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8).  The photo above and next two come from an alert Tony A doing his commerce on the East River.  In the photo below, it’s the green-fronted UN Building along with river with Trump Tower (dark) rising behind it.

When I caught notice of this, I thought I could hurry to Fort Wadsworth to catch photos of Yuma with Manhattan behind it, but my underestimation of  EPF’s speed and the coincidence of hitting every stoplight on Bay Terrace meant that when I got to the Fort,

Yuma was already making almost two dozen knots and headed for Norfolk, a trip that took less than 24 hours.

The EFTs are a further evolution of the HSTs, which I posted about here. By the way, Alakai was renamed USNS Puerto Rico, but then later that name was removed, since there’s a new EFT with the name USNS Puerto Rico in the offing.   So is the former Alakai now nameless?

Many thanks to Tony A for sending along the East River photos. Thanks to JED for the Odin/USS Kearsarge shot, and all the others by Will Van Dorp.

Happy June!

Here are the posts I did each of the past two years.  I’ll call this the beginning of the processional.  How many government vessels do you count in the photo below?

Carefully screened support vessels--Rana Miller, Elizabeth McAllister, and Resolute— lead the procession, here past Ellis Island,

while small craft of the NYC Navy and Air Force and others patrol.

Other McAllister boats include Alex McAllister . . . and

Eric.

CG-56 USS San Jacinto leads the larger vessel contingent.  She was here as well in 2012.   Know the import of that location in April 1836?  

Tomorrow will feature close-ups of the rest of the fleet, but for now we’ll leave it here.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who counts eight government craft in the first photo.  Here’s a post-fleet week photo set from 2009.

 

Here are previous installments focusing on background.

Sometimes the partial reveal and the juxtaposition highlight what’s on the shorelines, like those triple deckers in Bayonne that would blend in perfectly in many 19th century mill towns.

Or the hugely forgotten Singer plant in Elizabeth, hugely forgotten by most residents of Elizabeth, that is.  Imagine, if someone could turn the clock back on that one, 10,000 people would have manufacturing jobs . . . either sewing machines, or

weaponry of all sorts.

 

But one detail on the bank over by the NJ-side of the Bridge caught my attention.  So I thought these beams would be trucked from the disappearing bridge to a scrapping yard.  How surprised I was when the crane lifted the beam off the truck not 1000 feet from where they’d been on duty for decades and

lowered them

one after the other

to what might be a series of trucks below.  I can’t quite see what becomes of the beams on the ground at Bergen Point.  And I think that’s the Passaic small boat.  ??

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Keep your eyes open and stay safe.

or Bridge.

Below is a photo I took in October 2011 . . .

Also from October 2011, when the bridge looked like this,

squeezing under the roadbed looked like this, and

the McAllister stern quarter escort looked like this . . .

the mighty Maurania III, that is.  Here’s the complete post I did back then.

But five and a half  years have elapsed, not without change.  So earlier this week, Suez Canal in the KVK and under the Bayonne Bridge looked like this.  See the worker above the new roadbed?

See him now?

 

So this week it was Marjorie B on the stern, and

 

Ellen forward.

 

 

I hope to be around and doing this five and a half years from now to see what there is to see.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday I mentioned the request to help the Roaring Bull ferry project, and that’s now fully funded. Thank you.   Here’s another and more somber request that you might consider, the Captain Joseph Turi Memorial fund.

Here are previous installments of this title.  Marjorie B hurries alongside the container ship to assume position

closer to the bow, froth sprayed back by the head-on wind.

As they make their way through the gap,

all is lined up for the tight turn to starboard.

By the way, did you notice the landing net?

Well did you?  Actually I hadn’t either until later.

See the landing net stacked above the portside of Marjorie B?

Let’s roll back to a close up of the second photo, and there it is.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s always amazed by all the details I miss until I go back and look at the photos.

 

The 1931 bridge has been so prominent on this blog over the past decade plus that the past few years of construction and now deconstruction mesmerize me.  Just look at the header photo I’ve not changed since 2006.  I’ll never change it now.

I spent a few hours watching the work yesterday and share some of the photos here today and tomorrow.  Photo 1 was taken at 06:49 before work began, from what I could tell;  I’m the observer only and speculate sometimes because I’m not privy to the communications.  NY is to the left and NJ to the right.

06:54 … NJ side.  A safety and planning meeting?

07:01.  Workers use various means to venture out to the severed transverse beam (?) to begin its removal.

07:30.  Similar activity starts on the NY side.

07:52

08:25.  Almost imperceptibly slow, the movement of the transverse progresses.

08:28.  And then it speeds up.

08:36.  A flatbed trailer has backed into place to receive the beam.

08:38.  Meanwhile, over on the NJ side, a similar evolution has begun.

08:39.

Meanwhile, at 08:43, a container vessel is rounding Bergen bend  and headed for sea, after “threading the needle,”  …  well, not really, it made it in with those beams in place . . .

08:43, and we’ll pick up the evolution here tomorrow with MSC Kolkata   . . .  Note the crewmen on the bow?

I’d like to give a hat tip to all the Bayonne Bridge workers who work with such skill and safety in this enormous project, one of at least six bridge projects happening simultaneously in the greater sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Name that tugboat?

Or this one?

Or these two?  Answer follows.

Enjoy the rest of these for what they are . . .

Bruce A. McAllister above and Fort McHenry below.

Meredith C. Reinauer on a sunny but

cold morning.   Ready for the answers on the first three?

Well, the first was Kimberly Poling, then

Dace Reinauer, which I first saw looking like this.

And finally Emily Ann, which reminds me of an email I once receivedfrom a reader named R. Pena, who wanted to track down the boat to which he owed his life after his own had sunk between Cuba and Florida.  I embed the link to that post here because it’s a story that bears repetition.

And finally pushing New Hampshire around,

it’s Scott Turecamo.  As a former resident of that state, I thought no one ever pushed New Hampshire around!

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

 

This is a maneuver I always enjoy watching.

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It’s a case of getting the ship off the dock and rotating it in the desired direction within a confined space, with little room for error.

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Not over powering is part of the process, I  gather.

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Quick . . . name that tug?

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If this is New York, it’s likely one of two.

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Oops.

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As it heads out to sea, the playmaker

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leaves the ship and goes off to the next job.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

You can call this “three of five,” and enjoy the photos of her predecessors–Star and Sailhere, leaving Sun and Sky yet to come;  the builder is Chinese .  .  .  the Hudong-Zhonghua Shipyard, an enterprise going back to the 1920s.

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As Atlantic Sea made the turn into the KVK, i imagined her as an errant passenger vessel;  from this angle, she bears little resemblance to previous generations of container ships.

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I wonder if these lights stay on at sea.

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To see what she looks like below the waterline, click here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m adding this link after posting because it tells a story I’d never heard:  the sinking of an ACL vessel during the Falklands War here.  It has LOTS of photos. Thanks to RG.  Here are more photos.  And more.

 

Stuff happens.  Like cars and trucks, ships too sometimes need a tow.  Pretty World needed a tow to the repair facility a few years back.  Here’s Horizon Crusader towed to the scrap yard.  Here’s CV-60 USS Saratoga getting a tow to the same end.

Thorco Hilde found herself at the end of this tow line in the wee hours of Saturday morning.

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I caught the tow just as I went for a walk along the water’s edge.

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The zoom told me they were surely attached. As of Monday morning, she was in the Brooklyn Navy Yard getting fixed.

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The lead tug here is Marjorie B McAllister, featured in many previous posts indexed here.  In this role, she reminds me of some of Farley Mowat’s best, his novels about salvage tugs, a role once played by the tug below, now dissolving in the Arthur Kill, as she looked when I took her photo in August 2011.  In April 1945, the salvage tug below assisted in towing the torpedoed Atlantic States back to safety in Boston for repair and reuse.

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Many thanks to Thomas Steinruck for use of the top photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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