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See the US flag flying off the stern here and

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here?

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That makes this 1999 built container vessel somewhat unique among traffic in the Kills.

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Enjoy it.

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I’m not sure what purpose that primer-red upfolded arm serves or what it’s called.   rs4

Here Ellen McAllister 

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retrieves the docking pilot.

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while Robert continues the assist.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s still out cat fishing.   And while the fish were not biting, I read this Rick Bass collection, which I highly recommend if you’re looking to read.

 

This collage of orange and blue indicates that something unusual approaches . . .

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0846 hr . . .

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0904

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Atlantic Salvor might have been headed out on a long range mission, but

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at this point, I realized this mission would begin in the Lower Bay of the sixth boro along with

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lots of other vessels, although

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something new this year was the escort of four commercial tugs:  Sassafras, Miriam Moran, 

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Atlantic Salvor, and Normandy.   1150.    I was happy to find someone to talk to.

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It’s fleet week NYC.  Welcome all.

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It’s USS DDG 96,

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HMCS D 282,

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WMEC 911,

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HMCS MM 700,

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HMCS MM 708,

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LHD 5,

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DDG 99,

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and LSD 43.

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At 1216, Eric McAllister joins the welcome party . . .

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WLM 552.

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An E-2 flew by too.

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The message on the port wheel well ((?) amused me.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was last year’s arrival.

 

Click here for previous photos from Jed.  Click here for a photo of John W. Brown when she housed a high school in the sixth boro, pre-1988.  Jed took these photos while he was onboard in Norfolk this past weekend.   Click here for info about her September 2016 visit back to her place when she was assigned to the NYC Board of Education.

JOHN W BROWN

 

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For the rest, I’ll let Jed’s photos speak for themselves.

photo date 22 MAY 2016

photo date 22 MAY 2016

 

KIRBY MORAN

Steven McAllister is a 1963 YTB.   John W. Brown had already passed 20 eventful years under her keel by then.

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photo date 22 MAY 2016

 

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photo date 22 MAY 2016

 

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photo date 22 MAY 2016

 

Many thanks to Jed for these photos.  NYC should be seeing its own wave of gray arriving today.

Below is a photo taken on June 10, 1946 showing dozens of Liberty ships anchored between where the TZ Bridge would be built  (BF is correction thanks to Tony A’s comment)  and Haverstraw.  That looks like Ossining in the distance.  This photo and hundreds of others can be found in the Digital Collections of the NY State Archives here.   Who knows, Brown could actually be anchored among the others.

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I suppose I could call this RT 163b, since the photos in both were taken the same day, same conditions of light and moisture.

Let’s start with Charles D. McAllister with Lettie G. Howard bare poles in the distance.

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Evelyn Cutler with Noelle Cutler is tied up alongside a barge with Wavertree‘s still horizontal poles. Click here to see Evelyn as I first saw her.

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Viking is high and dry, post the winter work.

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Timothy L. Reinauer is back in town after a very long hiatus, at least from my POV.  This may have been the last time I saw her.

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Mary Gellatly gets some TLC as well;  click here for the previous time she was in a “random” post.

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Beyond Mister Jim, a pile of sand is growing in the yard just west of the Bayonne Bridge on the Staten Island side.

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Elizabeth and Marjorie B. McAllister head out for a job.

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Tasman Sea heads for the yard as

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Amberjack departs.

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And for closure, it’s Marjorie B passing in front of a relatively ship-free Port Elizabeth.  Click here for a photo of Marjorie B high and dry a few years ago.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And in contrast to all that, in Niigata earlier today, here’s some great vessel christening photos from Maasmondmaritime.

For context, let’s look back here. And last year among some of the great photos shared by Harry Thompson, here (scroll) was a crowded harbor photo I really liked.

Last Saturday saw threatening weather; even so, lots of small boats and crowds braved the possibility of rain to see the races.

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Vigilance prevailed and I heard of no incidents.

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And yes, I paid a lot of attention to the Bath Maine-built 1906 Mary E, but that’s because I haven’t seen her in 9 years . . . obviously I was looking in the wrong places.  Click here and scroll for a photo of Mary E in Greenport almost 9 years ago.

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Harvey was there.  Scroll here for one of my favorite photos of the 1931 Harvey, cutting through the pack at the 2013 tugboat race.

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The 1885 Pioneer was there. Click here for a sail I did on Pioneer a few years back.

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A raft of small boats clustered yet kept orderly.

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The 1935 Enticer  . . . well, enticed, spectators as a platform.

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as did a range of people movers. 

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including the 1983 Arabella.

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The captain of the heavyweight out there, the 2014 Eric McAllister, treaded lightly through the crowd.

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Of course, out in the mist along the Jersey side there are more heavyweights, a Moran tug and its huge NCL gem.

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And as for my ride, Monday morning it was earning money going for a load of scrap.

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Another tall old ship that might have been present–the 1928 Bivalve NJ-based A. J. Meerwald had other missions to perform.

All photos by will Van Dorp.  And for photos of some of the people on the boro who were working during the race, check out NYMediaBoat’s blog post.

 

 

So were the words of a bold attendant to Queen Victoria when the royal yacht was bested by a strange-looking upstart vessel from the former colonies called America.  As the Queen revealed her ignorance of the rules, I too must confess that–like a an inhabitant recently retrieved from a remote island and watching a MLB or NFL game for the first time–I was largely unaware of what I was seeing.  No matter, I enjoyed it and hope you enjoy these photos.

First, the muster. If you want the instructions, click here.

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It certainly appears the Japanese boat here is being towed.  Is this to demonstrate the foiling or train for it?  Here’s an explanation of how these 3000-pound vessels fly .. . or foil.

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If it seems that all the boats are identical except for the sponsors, you’re right.

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The logo at the top of all the mainsails is for Louis Vuitton.  Can someone explain why a trunk maker chooses to sponsor this race?   Isn’t it somewhat like an Indy car race sponsored by Victorias Secret, Epifanes,  or Penguin Books?

No matter, notice the throngs along the shore and the ledge of the building to the left?  I think of the third and fourth paragraphs from Moby Dick:

“Go from Corlears Hook to Coenties Slip, and from thence, by Whitehall, northward. What do you see?—Posted like silent sentinels all around the town, stand thousands upon thousands of mortal men fixed in ocean reveries. Some leaning against the spiles; some seated upon the pier-heads; some looking over the bulwarks of ships from China; some high aloft in the rigging, as if striving to get a still better seaward peep. But these are all landsmen; of week days pent up in lath and plaster—tied to counters, nailed to benches, clinched to desks. How then is this? Are the green fields gone? What do they here?

But look! here come more crowds, pacing straight for the water, and seemingly bound for a dive. Strange! Nothing will content them but the extremest limit of the land; loitering under the shady lee of yonder warehouses Battery Park City will not suffice. No. They must get just as nigh the water as they possibly can without falling in. And there they stand—miles of them—leagues. Inlanders all, they come from lanes and alleys, streets avenues—north, east, south, and west. Yet here they all unite. Tell me, does the magnetic virtue of the needles of the compasses of all those ships attract them thither?”

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The answer to that last question, it seems, is Yup!

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I’m intrigued by this power cat .  .  .  the timing vessel.  Is its work called telemetry?  Anyone tell me more about what instrumentation it contains?   I’m wondering if this will be the official timer for the larger boat race next year in Bermuda.

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I’m posting these photos earlier than usual today in hopes that they may prompt anyone who missed the race yesterday to brave the weather and watch today.

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I’ll post some more tomorrow.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to Gerard Thornton for this platform.   Click here (and scroll) for a photo of Eric R. Thornton.

 

This is a singular image, a 1969 tugboat in a century-and-a-half-old graving dock in Brooklyn.  Some of you maybe saw it on FB, but not everybody wades in FB waters.  What makes this photo so powerful to me is such a combination of composition, subject matter, and light that different people will look at this and see not all the same things.  Some might see beauty, and others defeat . . . or power, or fatigue, expense, challenge . . . .  It strikes me as not unlike this Mark Twain passage on conflicting ways of seeing a river.  And I’ll stop myself here.

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Click here for a favorite I took of the 1969 YTB-803 Nanticoke, now Robert E. McAllister.

Thanks again to Donald Edwards for permission to use this exquisite photo.

And while we’re on a Mark Twain morning, at the end of this post is a clue to my summer/fall employment.

This was the same morning as the photos in yesterday’s post.

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Amy C McAllister was assisting Polaris out to sea, and passing Wavertree‘s wrought iron hull.  Click here for a record on articles about this unique survivor.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And since it’s Earth Day, here’s a post from five years ago called Earth on Water Day, especially appropriate since the vessel in the photos above is named for a star in the night sky.

0633 . . . the other morning, a quarter hour after sunrise.

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30 seconds later, at a different angle.

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It’s really about light.

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0832  The good light is gone.  Time to move on to something else.   But wait . .  are those the towers of the new Goethals Bridge along the right edge of the photo?

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

And if you missed the new NY harbor dock book info yesterday, here it is again.  The author writes, “I decided to adapt his work into book form. I left the Martin Golden byline so he would get credit for his work. I think the old names on the docks are  best feature. Most of those terminals have gone the way of the dodo, but old timers can still be heard giving security calls at Standard Tank, Copper Docks and other places not there anymore.”

Unrelated:  Did anyone catch Kirsten Grace leaving the sixth boro this weekend?  Was she towing Newtown Creek to its new life?  As of this posting, Kirsten Grace is approaching Wilmington NC.

Let’s start with Marie J. Turecamo (1968).  And then let’s look at others out around this springtime morning:

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Like Joan Turecamo (1980), built near the confluence of the Hudson River and Erie Canal,

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heading out here with James D. Moran (2015);

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Caitlin Ann (1961) doing a recycling run;

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Emerald Coast (1973) leaving the U-Haul;

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North Sea (1982) heading for the Kirby yard;

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Robert E. McAllister (1969) heading out for a ship;

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Quenames (1982) moving a barge alongside;

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Crystal Cutler (2010) getting some maintenance; and

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that brings us back to Marie J. Turecamo and a photo taken only a minute of so before the lead-off photo in this post.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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