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A week ago or so I did a post called Sarah D moving light;  in the next two photos she has a scow that appears light.   Earlier this year, I caught her at the Narrows at dawn headed for Queens.

 

Just a little earlier, Jane A. Bouchard heads down bound with B. No. 225, her usual.

Click here for Jane/225 photos from back more than five years ago.

 

Carolina Coast and Pegasus nose up to a barge at American Sugar in Yonkers on a cold morning,

and Normandy hangs out just north of the passenger terminal with some extraordinary buildings.  For a photo from five+ years ago with Pegasus pre-upper wheelhouse, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who celebrates an anniversary today. Any guesses?

 

Of all the area Tilcon sites, this one at Clinton Point is the most conspicuous one as seen from the river.

If you’ve taken the train northward along the Hudson, you traveled just inland from this structure.

To see the cavity quarry behind the silos, click here and go to page 57 of what has become one of my favorite books. The quarry, where rock has been dug since 1880,  dwarfs the shoreline buildings.

Buchanan 12, a regular on the river doing Mississippi style assemblages of scows, here prepares another group for travel downstream.

 

I wonder if Tilcon welcomes visits by reporters . . . as this one in Illinois does.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s always a joy to be under way on the Hudson.  Enjoy these shots from last week.

Stephanie Dann passes a chimney of what may once have been an ice house.

Click here for previous Stephanie Dann photos.

With the Rip Van Winkle Bridge in the background, Sapphire Coast approaches pushing Cement Transporter 1801.

 

 

Near Catskill she passes Coral Coast with another cement barge.

 

And here my first time to see the rebranded Kristin Poling, moving Eva Leigh Cutler.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

. . . the tugs, starting with . . .

Prospector,  built in Indiana 1982, 48′ x 6′ and 800 hp; and presumably the right stuff for this job.  Would you guess the location as the Hudson River from the photo immediately below?  Hook Mountain is a beauty that I really need to hike!

But back to Prospector, a name that connotes seeking gold in them thar  .. . places, and this place has truly seen the distribution of gold.

 

Imagine the stories Tarrytown Light could tell of her 130 years standing on the eastern side of the Hudson.

 

The new TZ is usually described in superlatives, here by the builders and here by states folks.

 

I’ve now driven and ridden over the bridge a number of times, but from there, the view is never as good as this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who did the first post in this series here.

Click here for some views of the TZ Bridge area from eight years ago.

 

 

Here was 1 in this series.

About a month ago, I caught up with Buchanan 12 moving crude materials, as is almost always the case with Buchanan 12, aggregates, one of the basic elements for most construction projects.

According to this lohud.com story, about three million tons of aggregates were shipped on the Hudson in 2014.  My guess is that it’s higher today, since there’s long been  rock in “them thar hills.”

 

 

 

Some aggregates further move east toward the Sound, as these in the East River are.

Mister T is a Blount built tug.

And these seem mixed aggregates.

 

More statistics on aggregate production–including a listing of all the types–can be found here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous posts in this series.

Many thanks to Capt. Justin Zizes for these next six photos, all taken on November 6 during the transit of two Scarano schooners from NYC’s sixth boro up to Albany.

I would have joined as crew, but had obligations down river.  Here they glide under the TZ,

 

and northward . . . .

The highlands look positively fjord-like, because of course that is what that stretch of river is.

Here the boat approaches the bridges in Poughkeepsie.

Not quite a month ago–October 19–I caught another Scarano schooner up

by the Bear Mountain Brdge.

Unrelated:  Here’s an article on damage to insured recreational vessels from the hurricanes of 2017.

Here was a precedent.

Sugar Express .  . . I’ve seen and posted about you before here, here, and in other places.

Arabian Sea–where’s Sea Robin, previously on this route?– stood by with the barge while

another–Jonathan–was offloaded over at the ASR Group facility in Yonkers.  ASR Group is the contemporary name for a series of companies and mergers going back to the 18th century.

As crew on the barge watch, clamshells of sugar  lift from the hold.  See the crane operator in the blue t-shirt?

My guess . . .  10 tons per scoop?

Click here for more info on dry barge barge Jonathan, identical dimensions to Sugar Express.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

My conjecture is that some of this sugar comes from operations owned by the Fanjul family.  

 

This view looks south at what for a short term will be two TZ Bridges.

Lurking around the supports is the Tappan Zee II, bridge-dedicated tugboat, profiled a year and a half ago here.

 

At some point soon, the bridge to the right will be gone.

I’ve read the new TZ Bridge has a projected lifespan of a century.  What will the shoreline look like in 2117?

Where will the Left Coast Lifter lift next?

And here’s the current view looking northward.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

More on the TZ construction can be found here, thanks to William A. Hyman.

From this angle, Fort Lee–birthplace of the motion-picture industry– looks quite pristine.  Yes, that’s the west tower of the GW Bridge.  Am I correct in thinking the marketing name of the twin towers in the distance is the Moderns 1 and 2?

And on the subject of “towers” that Ocean Tower, a name I never know how to pronounce, as I first raised the question here over nine years ago.

Here’s the tow I saw last week.

 

Judging from the barge name TZC-102,  these bridge supports will undergird parts of the TZ Bridge, the completion of this huge project will soon transform into a huge sale of assets.

And where are these supports pre-cast?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks you might enjoy this recent Scientific America article on suspension v. cable-stay bridges.

After about 3600 posts and almost 11 years, I’ve concluded my titling is based on a flawed assumption, i.e., nothing is random or generic except such things as our understanding.  Another way of saying that is . . . everything has a specific context.  A better title for this post would be something like tug/barge units between Kingston-Rhinecliff and Bear Mountain Bridges on such/such date with various sceneries related to autumn in the case.  But, I’m not switching so bulky or to re-title everything, so on we go;  life has no first drafts.

Having blabbered all that, I just have to say the Hudson Valley is a beautiful place, and the creations of our work in it serve to complement the natural beauty.

Consider Delaware and DoubleSkin 50.

 

Or Coral Coast and

Cement Transporter 5300.

 

Sarah Ann and Cape Wendy.

And Haggerty Girls with

RTC 107, with birds rounding Bear Mountain . . ..

 

Here’s a closing look.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

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