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This photos and text come from JS, a frequent commenter on this blog.   He took the photos on a voyage that left NYC in July 1966 and returned to LA in December.

JS:  “President Pierce (C-3) is being dragged stern first from the dock by an Indonesian tug to mid channel in a shifting procedure.   I took the snaps standing on the dock of a rubber port in Java.  We loaded latex rubber.  The port was Belawan Deli. No one went ‘ashore’ but we did trade newly purchased Seiko watches for Bali heads to smuggle home and  sell in antique stores.That place was a short day or two sail from our loading general cargo in Singapore.”

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Tugster:  I’ve no idea what has become of this steam tug. Here’s some info on Djatisari.

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Here’s some info on Florian Ceynowa.

JS continues:  “It’s me on the right (2nd electrician, promoted from wiper), my uncle Al (John Noble‘s neighbor) and Steve Duhamel, the bull wiper.  He was great at moving 55-gallon drums anywhere in the engine room.  Also, note the longshoremens outhouse overhanging the stern rail of the Pierce.”

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JS:  “Fish loading was from an anchorage in either Port Swettanam, or Penang, Malaysia. Local longshoremen winched them from boats alongside, stacked them in our t’ween deck reefers, and we discharged half the load into uncovered trucks on a cold Yokohama dock weeks later and the rest stayed on for U.S.”

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“Whole frozen tuna gathered by the tails, being winched from fishing boats holds.”

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“After a 6-month ‘jungle run’, conditions on board had become lax. The ship was in disarray, so perhaps the patrolmans report was a bit severe.   We were paid with cash and we happily descend the gangway in a “suitcase parade”.

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Many thanks, JS.  I’d love to see more pics and hear other stories like these.

The world was truly a different place a half century ago.

 

The title is such a mouthful that I’ll soon reduce it to GHP&W. Although this blog began with photos and observations of mostly working vessels in the great harbor associated with New York City, the watery part of which I call the sixth boro, the blog followed a course suggested by these vessels to other GHP&Ws. And given then the global nature of water traffic, it seems logical to devote at least a month to other GHP&Ws.

I’ll kick off with this post about a port I’ll likely never visit, the former Aral Sea fishing port of Moynaq in Uzbekistan.  The photos come from Getty Images by Bjorn Holland and Kelly Cheng. Surprisingly maybe, I live in a neighborhood of NYC where Uzbek is the dominant language, which was part of my motivation to read a Tom Bissell book called Chasing the Sea:  Lost among the Ghosts of Empire in Central Asia.  I highly recommend it.

So here are some detail areas of a huge aerial photo print I saw the other day.  Can anyone point to detail that confirms a date?  My guess is somewhere in the 50s or 60s.   The first photo below shows the southeast point of Bayonne NJ.  The peninsula bisecting the top and bottom is MOTBY.  Governors Island is upper right and the Statue is upper left with the southern tip of Manhattan along the top.

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Below is a closer up of the lower right corner of the photo above, showing that tugboat, some barges, and two sets of  trucks  at the cement dock.

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Note the Statue and Ellis Island.  To the left of it is now Liberty State Park.  The Caven Point Pier crosses the center of the photo and the current Global Terminal is still waiting for fill.

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Below is the just capped landfill that is topped by the Bayonne Golf Club.   Lower left is quite the gunkhole with disintegrating watercraft I’d love to see a closeup of.

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Remember that all the B/W “photos” above are parts of the same aerial shot.

Let’s have a fun month with lots of GHP&Ws.  And not to be too prescriptive, I’d love photos from a variety of GHP&Ws in Asia and Africa, mostly lacking in my previous 2900+ posts.  Of course, here and here are a few posts I’ve done on African ports; here,  Asian; and here and here, South American.

While I’m asking for collaboration, I have a chance to replicate a trip on a major African river that I originally did in 1973-74;  what I seek is leads to a publication that might be interested in the story and photos. The trip is pricey, and if I can sell a tale with photos, I can offset some of the expense. Anyone have ideas or connections?

Hudson, launched 1939, spent WW2 working for the British Ministry of Shipping, having left the Netherlands with a tow to Africa just before the Germany invasion and occupation.  After the War, it towed to ports worldwide until 1963, when it was deemed underpowered and sold for scrap.  Instead, it was purchased by a fishery as an ice-making ship, which it did until 1989.  And again it was to be scrapped.  This time, a foundation bought it, invested 14 years of restoration, and now, as a unique industrial  artifact, it’s berthed in Maassluis, where visitors can picture the life of those in ocean towing from just before WW2 until 1960.

 

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Hercules was built in the Netherlands in 1915 and worked for a Danish company until the late 1970s, when it was purchased for much-needed restoration.  See its condition here.

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Furie has a similar story:  it was built in the Netherlands in 1916, sold to a Swedish lumber company in 1918.  It worked mostly on the Baltic until 1976, when it was returned to the Netherlands for restoration and assumed a role in a Dutch TV series called Hollands Glorie, inspired by Jan de Hartog novel.  You can watch the 90-minute series pilot here.   It was made in 1977 and in Dutch, but it follows a new chief mate named Jan Wandelaar (hiker or wanderer) in the “hiring hall.”   Give it a shot.  If you want to skip around, the captain’s character gets established around the 10-minute mark.  Around the 21-minute mark they are off the coast of Ireland.  Around the 29-minute mark, the captain negotiates in his version of English for the tow and the next few minutes are exciting.  Around 41 minutes in, they are towing a dredge along the WestAfrican coast to Nigeria.  Around 1 hour 5,” they deal with a leak in the dredge.

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Equally picturesque although I don’t know the stories are Anna and

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Alphecca.

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These photos by Freek Konings come via Fred Trooster, to whom both I am grateful.

This post from 2013  was prompted by a request from Freek that I try to learn the disposition of a former Dutch Navy tug, likely sunk by the USCG.  We are still looking for info on the fate of Wamandai.

Here’s a link to the series.

Click anywhere on the photo below to see its provenance.  My question is .  . where and when was this photo taken?

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Here’s a closer up of the top portion of the photo.  And if you haven’t clicked on the photo above, I’ll tell you the source is a fine book by Captain Bill Eggert called Gentlemen of the Harbor.

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The image below comes from  an archived issue of Moran’s Towline magazine.  You have another chance to guess the date.  A difference here is that the photos above show the Class B boats and the one below the first two finishers of the Class A boats in this race.

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And here is the answer.  Evidence of the location of this race is in this link, where you see vintage photos of the Edgewater Ford plant, which closed in 1955 and was demolished in the late 1980s.   Click here for some unusual Ford trucks built in Edgewater and used during WW2.

Back to the International Maritime Races,  click here for info on the winner Socony 11, who came back to race 54 years later!!  Photo at the end of this post.   For career info and photos of Carol Moran, click here.

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Excuse the redundancy in the image below, also from the October 1953 issue of Towline.

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Here’s a 9/13/1953 Brooklyn Eagle p. 22 version of the race.

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Going back to the top photo, YTB-499 is still in USCG documentation, now as Marine Retriever, operating out of Coos Bay, OR.  C. Stewart Lee, originally built for the Navy as YT-134, is likely scrapped.  New York Central No. 25, disposition unknown,was built in Newburgh in 1908. Maybe someone else can add some info on what looks like Dauntless No. 2 and the boat beyond it.    And the two spectator boats?  I presume the larger one is a Circle Line vessel.

I hope I’m right about Dorothy Elizabeth being the reincarnation of Socony 11.   Unfortunately, in the photo from 2007, she was not far from the scrapper’s jaws. Click here (and scroll) to see how the same boat appeared in the movie Carlito’s Way.

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taken by Will Van Dorp, September 2, 2007

Check out Eggert’s Gentlemen of the Harbor.

 

Here was part 1.  Thanks much for the comments.  My conclusion is that most but not all were taken at the 1986 centennial celebration of our lady of the harbor.    I am still seeking a photo of the canal tug Grand Erie, ex-USACE Chartiers, launched in 1951, at the event.

Barque Simón Bolívar it would be good to see her back in the sixth boro again.  At this point, she was less than a decade old.   This past summer, she called in various ports in the Caribbean.

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Any help here anyone?

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USS Iowa BB-61 served as the reviewing stand for the event.  Click here for scans of the day and here for video.  Can anyone identify the tug alongside the battleship starting at about 2:10?

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Barque Eagle of course.  Can anyone identify the tugs in this photo?

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It’s schooner Pioneer in the background.

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The red-hulled vessel at the foot of the tower .  . is that stick lighter Ollie, now rotting away in VerPlanck?  See the end of this post.   Anyone know the USCG tug?

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These look like the morning-after spent fireworks shells.  What did it say in front of “industry” here?  And here ends the photos supplied by Harry Thompson.

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And here, as a note that I should do a post soon about Ollie . . . is one of the photos I took of her in 2010.  I saw her earlier in 2015, and it’ was even sadder by five years than this one.  Anyone have good pics of Ollie in her day?

Thanks very much, Harry, for getting this show going.

From George Conk . . . it’s Ahoskie, taken in Rockland, Maine.

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from Jonathan Steinman, it’s Franklin Reinauer at sunrise on the East River, passing under–I guess-the Manhattan Bridge.

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From Allen Baker, earlier this week, it’s Eagle, once again in the sixth boro.

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From Bjoern Kils . . . it’s Kalmar Nyckle . . . taken by his mom in Lewes, DE.

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From Zwaan Casasnuevas, it’s Half Moon in her current berth in Hoorn, NL, one stormy day last week.

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From eBay and identified only by date, a view from 1946 featuring Chancellor and an unknown tug, probably NYC.  Anyone help with identification?

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And finally from the same ethereal realms, it’s an unidentified Dalzell tug,

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Thanks to George, Jonathan, Allen, Zwaan, Bjoern, and the webworldlings .. .

Many thanks to Paul for this aerial photo, said to show tugboats idled by the strike that lasted the first half of the February 1946.

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Here’s the verso of the photo, in the case you read Spanish.

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For more context of 1946 NYC, click here for a set of Todd Webb  photos.  If you have time for the 13-minute video at the end of that link, it’s well-worth it also, especially for the quote attributed to O. Henry . . . calling NYC “Baghdad on the subway,” which has a whole different set of connotations in 2015 as in O. Henry’s day.

Click here for more 1946 sixth boro photos by Andreas Feininger.

And since we’re stuck in 1946 for now, check out this Life article with drawings about a 1946 proposal to build a “first-world” airport (my quotes) along Manhattan’s west side covering 9th Avenue to the water and between 24th and 71st!

 

Here are posts about Wavertree’s trip to the dry dock and before.  And below are two photos I hadn’t used in those posts.

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May 21, 2015

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May 21, 2015

In the past 10 weeks, prep for the actual dry docking has resulted in loss of at least a foot and a half of draft.  Mussels once submerged have lost their habitat.

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July 30, 2015

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July 30, 2015

Let’s descend into through the forward cargo hatch to see where a cavernous hold is getting even more cavernous.

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from the ‘tween decks looking up and …

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… down …

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and all the way down

Note the ladder beyond the foremast, as seen from standing to starboard of the keelson.

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Looking to the stern from the ‘tween decks.  As Mike Weiss said, “a cathedral of cargo.”

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For scale, note the worker wearing a white hard hat on the keelson beyond the mast

Looking astern from atop a makeshift block of ballast on the port side of vessel.  That’s the main cargo hatch prominent in the center of the photo.   My response to Mike’s quote is “an ark of angled wrought iron.”

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This is how the skeleton of a 130-year-old vessel looks.

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Looking toward the rudder post from the ‘tween decks.

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Returned to the main deck looking forward at the cargo hatches.

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Removal of extraneous and/or non-original weight has included belgian block and large concrete block ballast.  This water tank may be original

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And here are the credits.

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Many thanks to Mike Weiss and  South Street Seaport Museum for the tour; click on that link for membership info.  August promises to be more prep work for dry docking.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for CSM article about the 1983 initial and partial restoration of Wavertree.

I went quite close to the source of the Hudson four years ago . . . here.   But earlier this summer I stopped in Glens Falls, just because I wanted to see the falls.

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Glens Falls as seen from the Route 9 bridge

Here’s more . . .

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and more.

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Glens Falls as seen from below the Route 9 bridge

And here’s looking down the Hudson from below the bridge, with Finch Paper to the left and SCA Tissue to the right.

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Back to the Route 9 bridge, here’s the old central office, and click here for an interesting Finch Paper history.

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But here’s the real nugget . . . the really interesting piece of history, and it’s UNDER the bridge.  Charles Reed Bishop, local boy orphaned by age 4, who tagged along with a friend with connections–William Little Lee.  At age 24, the two of them headed for San Francisco, and since this was 1846, that meant sailing around Cape Horn and stopping in Hawaii along the way.  Bishop stayed, became a citizen of the Kingdom of Hawaii, and the rest of the story is here.

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How’s that for an unlikely trajectory for a Hudson river boy AND information found under a bridge?   And about 50 miles south of here, in Troy, along the river’s edge is another plaque celebrating another Hudson river boy with an unlikely trajectory into the Pacific.

Photos by Will Van Dorp.

First, for a focused statement on the importance of this vessel and Lafayette on US independence, click here  . . . from a Portland Maine publication.   More on Lafayette, click here, but skip the partisan dribble in paragraphs 3–6.  Also, here.

Most of the photos in this post I took on July 1, by which time the French shore contingent had done a great job setting up a pier display, and here’s my favorite poster.  Doubleclick on the photo to enlarge it and read the numbers.

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Soon after all lines were made fast, the ceremony started:  music, uniforms, flags, and the CASK!  It’s to be auctioned off.  I’d love to know the price.

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Thanks to Linda Roorda, Peter Boucher, and Xtian Herrou for answers about the flags and uniforms.  The uniforms here and in Wednesday’s post of the Breton bagpipers and the two matelots are French Naval summer uniforms. The flag flown below the US flag on L’Hermione is the Serapis flag–or a variation thereof– flown by John Paul Jones.

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Yesterday I stopped by and was fortunate to here speeches under the FDR.  Here, with microphone, South Street Seaport Museum Executive Director Jonathan Boulware talks about the ships, the museum, and all six boros of NYC.

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Then a parade set out from the pier and headed via Wall Street to Bowling Green, stopping

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briefly at Federal Hall.

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Happy Independence Day.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

If you have time for a little history of LaFayette, click here.  If you want more complicated history, sorting out fact and fiction about the signers of the Declaration, click here.

 

 

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