You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Half Moon’ category.

..plus one year, that is, not quite.  A year ago, work to ready the vessel for a mid-May splash reached frenzied levels, but the Adriaen aka Aerjan Block replica made an early June appointment to be part of River Day.  Here Onrust follows Half Moon in the direction of Tappan Zee Bridge, distant background.

Here she dangled, late May 2009, minutes before splash, and

here she shivers, nine months later, February 2010, in an Albany shipyard awaiting warmer weather.

Here was two days post-splash, just above Lock 9, and

… February 2010, Albany shipyard.

Here, in suspension  . . . merest seconds before the first ever splash, and

… February 2010, Albany.

And some 70 miles south of Albany . . . Half Moon waits in a protected area for all the ice to clear out.   I wonder if the ghost of Henry migrates south to this bend in the river to find solace in the dark months . . .

and if so . . . what are his dreams, his obsessions . . .   And if that’s true, whose ghost inhabits the replica of Onrust?

Plans for Onrust for this coming season include completing the interior and doing other finishings that’ll allow further voyages, maybe in time . . . retracing the travels of Captain Block.  After four voyages to North America, Block never returned;  he continued to sail but into the cold regions north of Scandanavia once explored by Hudson.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

In less than half day from this writing, March will arrive.  Since I hope for t-shirt mildness by end of March, I’m counting on the month to arrive  . . . like a large feline:  lion plus whatever synergy comes from compounding with year of the Tiger.  (For the record, the tiger portion of that synergy frightens me most.)  As peace offering then, I dedicate this post to the large felines.  The foto of Sea Lion below comes from 2006;  I haven’t seen this 1980 tug in a while.  Anyone explain?

Feline connection with Half Moon?  Some of the hawses, like these two, are

framed by red felines . ..  line lions, I suppose?

Atlantic Leo

Onrust has as figurehead a growling lion today, but this foto from a year ago shows the about-to-hatch beast pre-blond, actually natural wood tones.  More Onrust soon.

Growler . ..  that could be a lion reference.

Eagle Boston, escorted by McAllister Responder, shows registry as Singapore, from the Malay Singapura meaning “Lion City,”   although the namesake was probably a tiger, not a lion at all.  So we should call that nation Tigrapura?

From the platbodem armada headed north on the Hudson last summer, farther is Danish Naval Frigate Thetis, but nearer sailing vessel is Pieternel, registered in the Dutch town of Beneden-Leeuwen (Lower Lion).

Notice the claws hanging from the bow of tanker Puma.

And thanks to my poor eyesight, it’s easy to see the lettering on the Evergreen vessel forward here of Tasman Sea as Ever Feline.  Can’t you make it out?  Squint a bit and it’s skewed as daylight . ..  Ever Feline, also registered in Tigrapura.

All fotos by will Van Dorp, who’s hoping for t-shirt weather and a dip off Coney Island in exactly 31 days.  Anyone care to join in . . .  a Patty Nolan bikini?

A fortnight PLUS 400 years ago, Half Moon lay in what we now call the Upper Bay;  a momentous encounter of civilizations soon drew blood, and  would draw more.   Today is more or less the anniversary of the northernmost point reached by Half Moon.  What little we know of the actual trip comes from the pen of someone lacking much fondness for Henry Hudson, who was quite the mystery man.  No, I’m not going to say Henry was actually Henriette.

aane2

Prolific author Joseph Bruchac has written River of Tides, a play telling of this encounter from the perspective of the people native to the river valley 400 years ago.    Photos below were taken by Bowsprite at the premier last week.  Below, the author introduces the story.

aart1

Other times and places to see the pay include the following:

  • Thursday, September 24, Troy, NY, 10:30 AM, Bush Memorial Hall, Russell Sage College, 45 Ferry St.
  • Saturday, September 26, New York, NY, 5 pm, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University downtown Manhattan campus, 3 Spruce Street (East of Park Row, near the corner of Gold Street). Reservations suggested at www.SmartTix.com or 212-868-4444.
  • Sunday, September 27, Poughkeepsie, NY, 2 pm, Marist College Nelly Goletti Theatre, Student Center. Contact Hudson River Valley Institute, 845-575-3052, Andrew.villani@marist.edu
  • Tuesday-Friday, October 6-9, New York, NY, adaptation for elementary schools, National Museum of the American Indian in New York. To register for school performances educators should contact Ada Torres at 212-514-3705.

aart2

Enjoy.  I will be at the Saturday Pace performance.

Meanwhile, stay tuned here for the last several installments of Henrysobsession, the version produced by Bowsprite and me.

Bowsprite satified my hungry eyes with her epic vistas of the diverse craft in the Upper Bay Sunday.  Let me complement by directing the eyes to equally satisfying detail.  Like flags defying uniformity of color and shape flying from

aadt1

mastheads of divers tips.  Actually, the tell-tale is called a wimpel.  On the top foto, notice the Flinter house flag.

aadt11

Fugelfrij, built in 2000, already striking with its flat-black hull, enhances that with   . . . black fenders.

aadt2

Vrouwe Cornelia, 1888, has lovely carved signs.  Whoever Lady Cornelia was, she

aadt3

left her shoes on deck.  Was she the beloved, or

aadt4

despite the wooden shoes . . . the mermaid muse of the first skipper?  Either way, this reminder rides Cornelia‘s tiller through every turn.

aaaam

These three boats (far to near . . . Pieternel, Sterre, and Vrouwe Cornelia ) alone have the combined age of 362 years!

aadt5

And each tiller carries a different beast, land spirit or

aadt7

water.  This fish rides Sterre‘s rudderhead.

aadt8

Like grapes are these parrel beads, and like a fine basket the fenders on Windroos.

aaaawr

And after night fell, there was the utterly delightful music man of the waters, Reinier Sijpkens, turning as many circles as

aaax

designs on his vessel or notes in his music.  See him here on Youtube.

aaax2

More soon.  All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Remember, fotos of the trip upriver can be seen at Arjen’s  site here.  It’s also an opportunity to struggle with Dutch text.  Still more fotos are here.

And a request:  if you happen to cross paths with this flotilla the next few weeks, I’d love to see and maybe post your fotos.  Email me.

This morning at dawn,  replica Half Moon, was anchored in Gravesend Bay.  Four hundred years ago, VOC Half Moon was, and worlds began to collide.  Today they continue to collide.  They don’t need to.  Empathize.

aahm

Let’s dance to our neighbor’s drum as well as to our own.  Foto above was taken at the Salt Festival on August 29.  Thanks to Red Storm Drum & Dance Troupe for posing.

Bowsprite and I have been trying to imagine this collision, with all its casualties and boons, angst and ecstasy, steps forward and back . . . in Henry’s Obsession.

So here is most of the rest of the fleet.  Of course, Half Moon was the flagship, the raison d’etre of the event.  Following behind is Onrust, its first season teaching history.  Use the search window to find more on both.  For a creative-nonfiction account of Henry Hudson’s journey channeled across 400 years, click here.

aap1

Tjalk Hoop en Vertrouwen (Hope and Trust, Confidence) dates from 1913!

aap2

Check out the four rows of reef points in the sail!

aap2b

Lemsteraak LE89 dates from 2005. Partly obscured is Windroos, the hoogaars from 1925.

aap3

Check out the crew shirts that read “Touch of Dutch.”

aap3b

Ommeswaaij is a Lemsteraak from 1995.

aap4

First in this pack is the tjalk De Tijd zal t Leeren (Time Will Learn It), dating from 1912.

aap5

All in all it was a lovely parade.  Standing on Pier 84 I was moved to tears, especially during the gun salute as I heard background chatter mostly in my mother tongue.  Given all the preparation that went into these festivities, I have a complaint:  the outermost portion of that pier has been incomplete for some time.  Almost finished but NOT.  That outer portion would also have been the best platform for fotos, which a lot of people recognized to be true.  Since no signs prohibited access, a few dozen folks stepped over the fence and started snapping fotos and cheering friends and relatives–yes, relatives–on the boats.  Until various authorities arrived, threatening $100 fines.  It troubled me to hear threats used against tourists who might have marginal control of English.

My question is . . . why is this decking work not complete in time to be used for such high-profile events as this.  After all, less than 300 feet away were the Mayor, the US Secretary of State, and the Crown Prince and Princess of the Netherlands?

aapo

And when a certain boat blocked these fotografers, some of them were unhappy, especially that tall guy, arms akimbo.

aapp01

And what view was this certain boat blocking . . . you ask?  Check this out!!  And please finish the pier decking!  I’ll even volunteer to help with the installation.

aapwv

I have a request:  certain folks would like the opportunity to photograph and sketch these classic and exotic boats in all their lush detail.  There is a viewing scheduled on Governors Island on Sunday, but the time is short.  Also, might there be a back-up time if –say–it rains?  For specifics on each of the Dutch boats, click here.

Arms akimbo-guy . . . oh, that’s tugster.

All fotos except the last two by Will Van Dorp.  The last two come from Bernard Ente.  Thank you!

Quick post on the 1st annual Atlantic Salt Maritime Fest.  Atlantic Salt brings salt from Ireland, Chile, and Mexico through the sixth boro to keep icy roads less treacherous.  Where salt made a huge mound in this winter post, today there was frivolity, free food, and lots of smiles.  Thank you, Atlantic Salt.  Below Half Moon and container vessel Sumida meet.

aasf0

Kristy Ann Reinauer and Thomas Witte paraded past, and

aasf2

as did  Rana Miller.  More Rana later; she’s quite similar to Guardian, posted here last winter.

aasf1

There was singing, drumming, and dancing.

aasf1

Did it rain??

aasf7

No, problem.  Did tugster find friends?  Oh, this is getting frivolous.

aasf8

Bowsprite took the foto above; all others by Will Van Dorp.  By the way, if you know the Where’s Waldo series, bowsprite is depicted in TWO of the fotos above.  Where’s bowsprite?

By the way, as of this writing, Flinterduin, the 15-masted motor vessel,  approaches 50 degrees west, due south of Newfoundland.  She should enter the harbor before Monday morning; I will do the math later to narrow the ETA.  Remember the foto contest.

An adjective I’ve not heard of late and would like to resurrect is “many-splendored.”  That word captures my sense of the KVK, aka Kill van Kull.   If you live anywhere near the sixth boro, you can get up close by coming to the maritime fest at the Atlantic Salt yard.  I’ve not found much info about  them, but this is a space where salt is stockpiled for safe driving on icy roads, not savory eating in spite of your doctor’s wishes.  One post I wrote about this place is here.  Anyone share a link for more Atlantic Salt?  For example, I know salt comes from multiple places;  anyone help with provenance info?  On the building poster, the red-white-blue mound behind the orange ferry is a tarp-covered salt pile.

aasf

I caught this prep work happening at Atlantic Salt yesterday.   The Weeks barge carries the universe of waterpod.

aasf1

Atlantic Salt lies near the east end of KVK;  Norwegian Sea here enters the west end. That’s Shooter’s Island behind Norwegian, and behind that, reaching even higher than the upper wheelhouse, those are the gantries at Howland Hook.

aasf2

In almost the same location, sometimes referred to as Bergen Point, Oleander shows how a container ship lists in a turn; I imagine “slaloming” past a marker at the inside of a channel turn.

aasf3

John B. Caddell is a regular on the KVK, as

aasf4

are assist tugs Ellen McAllister and

aasf5Gramma Lee T. Moran.

aasf6

All fotos taken this week by Will Van Dorp.  This September is a many-splendored month;  two big, nearly-climactic,  halfmoonthly installments –we hope the channeling efforts work–coming up for HenrysObsession, the creative non-fiction and art project by Bowsprite and Tugster.

Some announcements:

This Sunday into Monday . . . Flinterduin will enter the sixth boro.  I reiterate the foto contest of this many-masted motor vessel entering the harbor delivering the many-splendored sailing barges.

September 6:  the 17th annual running of the sixth boro’s tugboat race.

September 12thish:  Waterford Tug Roundup.  Note that voting for “people’s choice” tug is long underway.  Anyone can vote ONCE.  I already did.

In mid-August 1609 Robert Juet wrote in the log of Half Moon–that Half Moon– . . “we killed an extraordinary fish . . .”  Nothing more in the way of explanation or description or taste did he write.  That makes me want to speculate all night and all day . . and start a game like . .  what extraordinary thing else might they have killed or at least experienced.  Check out the extraordinary catch I witnessed today in the KVK.  They pull and

aaf2

they strain and

aaf1

bring up a most extraordinary . . . cement block.  “Part of a sediment sampling monitoring program,” I hear.  Although Kenneth Biglane is a locally-based EPA vessel,  I’ve never seen it until today.  Incidentally, the vessel’s namesake studied oil spill containment in many places including the Torrey Canyon spill in 1967.

aaf3

Earlier in the morning, a most extraordinary orange boat, previously depicted on this blog, crisscrosses the KVK as part of a sampling of sediments, I’m told, that

aaf4

are no longer there as well as what’s left below where the silt is no longer there . . . or something.  Michele Jeanne sampled away until it had to get out of Sea Miror‘s way, and then

aaf5

Tomorrow, another day, I’ll go off in search of more extraordinary . . . .  Join along?  By the way, Sea Miror is ex-Maritime Pearl, 1990.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

X . . . no xebecs sail the sixth boro, and my 2100-page dictionary has only 2 and a quarter pages devoted to words starting with “x.”  Yet, when X lives  in a word, it intensifies.  Consider the difference between the mundane “tacks” and the pulse-quickening “tax.”   I’ll get back to this deck barge in a moment.

aaax1

From math we learn that X is the unknown.  Of all the steel beyond the eastbound tug Norwegian Sea, backlighting “x’s” out all the details except silhouette.  From AIS, I know the ships are tankers Tanja Jacob and Kinaros (member of the elite AMVER group), and beyond them MS Explorer of the Seas.

aaax2

X . . . experimental, except Twin Tube is not a sailing prototype; rather, it’s half of the Reynolds lightering fleet.

aaax3

Dutch replica vessels like Onrust and Half Moon often sport XXX somewhere, which some attribute to the laissez-faire of Amsterdam, but in fact,

aaax4

the letters are crosses and arranged vertically.

aaax5

Xcentric . . . might be an exhilarated adjective for this twin-telephone booth truckable tug.

aaax6

X marks the spot . . . the X generating much more excitement than A or B or C  . . . marks the spot.

aaax7

I haven’t seen Treasure Coast in a spell.  Check this link for a great high and dry foto of  Treasure Coast‘s hull.

aaax8

Yeah . . . how could I not go here.  You knew it too, right?

aaax9

X . . . the ecstatic letter;  English really could function as well with “eks,” but the energy level, the fuel that drives ambition, would be diminished.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

My Parrotlect Flickrstream

PC290099

PC290098

PC290097

P7070075

P7070073

P7070072

0aaaaff9

0aaaaff5

More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

free web page hit counter
April 2014
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 320 other followers