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I’ll reprise some of these vessels in later posts, but this traffic we passed or followed unbound from Quebec City.

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Umiavut serves the Canadian Arctic.

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Ocean Traverse Nord has been featured in earlier posts.  Here she’s at capacity with dredge spoils from Lac St. Pierre and off to the release site.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m not adding much text in the next few posts.  Why gild the lily or rouge the autumn maple leaf.  When I’m back in the sixth boro, I’ll revisit some of these photos.   For now enjoy Quebec.

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This is Montmorency Falls.

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Amundsen will be breaking ice soon.  Winter is coming.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Some of you may remember the January River, or JR, posts I did three years ago in July.  I went to Brasil because my daughter was there, and she’s a fluent Portuguese speaker.   I had a great time, swam in several places, and never got sick.  I’m putting some photos never posted here up today because I know there are sewage issues there in the huge bay called Guanabara, but let’s not make a poopmageddon out of it, as the meteorologists do with the snowmegeddons in winter up here.   Excuse my Portuguese, but merda sells news, always will.

I took this photo looking west from Arpoador toward Ipanema Beach.

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Here’s a shot from the same point looking toward Copacabana.

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Here’s a shot of Copacabana looking toward the Bay, with Sugar Loaf as the prominent feature along the ridge.  A fair number of people were in the water despite the heavy surf.

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I chartered this boat and –all tallied– chugged around Bay for about six hours.

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Of course, I was looking who was there, like Galliano, LA’s  C-Enforcer,

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CNL Ametista from Santos,

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Rio’s own TS Abusado and TS Soberano,

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Seabulk Brasil,

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a pilotboat and tug Atlantico standing off near Hai Yang Shi You,

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CPO Copacabana, and many,

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many more.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders where these vessels are today.

Let’s start with one that I can’t identify, other than by its name . . . Charlie E, I believe.  I took this photo in Port Colborne.

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I was wrong when I thought McKeil’s Sharon M I was an ex-Candies tug like Na Hoku or Greenland Sea.  It turns out she was built in Japan.

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I can’t ever remember seeing a heaping load of coal like this . . .

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Petite Forte was docked also along the Welland Canal with barge St. Mary’s Cement.

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I’ll put up a pilot boat post soon.  Meanwhile, can you identify this pilot boat?

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Jaclyn is a 41′ tug built in 1967.

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Joncaire, it turns out, is an important name in Niagara history.

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Eagle is a 57′ tugboat built in 1943 and operating out of Cleveland. Here she heads for the outer harbor.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is unpacking as quickly as possible, and preparing to repack soon.

I’m catching up here, with this post from the top west side of Lake Huron, where the skies and

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and waters teemed with people.

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I headed to the high ground where the fort stands,

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From the wall, I saw US-built  Samuel de Champlain pass southbound.

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Schooner Inland Seas was anchored over by the Round Island light.

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Corsair  brought in food trucks, which

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get offloaded onto wagons.

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Teamster, trickster, tugster . .  got it all in this post.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

We had a long transit from Detroit to Mackinac, so here are a lot of photos, starting with Federal Kumano and Ambassador Bridge in the distance;

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passing steel operations,

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and the mailboat Westcott.

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Near central Detroit a pilot boards Federal Kumano from Huron Maid.

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Entering Lake St. Clair, we pass Philip R. Clarke, 

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followed by Lubie in China township,

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Radcliffe R. Latimer, 

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Great Lakes Maritime Center,

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lightship Huron,

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and as we headed unbound into Lake Huron, we passed Arthur M. Anderson . . . the last vessel in contact with the Fitzgerald before she was taken by Superior.

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This was sunrise nearing the end of this leg, and in the night and distractions, I missed Alpena.

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This post closes with Buffalo, as she leaves the Mackinac Bridge behind her.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

We didn’t make 7  because of delays, but stuff happens and here’s catch-up.

That’s Toronto as seen from the Lake as we head for Port Weller, where

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we take a pilot.

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We wait for a down bound vessel in the first lock, and then

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“record” it as it passes.

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We pass a load of coal between locks 7 and 8.

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Then we drop a pilot at Port Colborne and

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and pass the marine recycling yard before

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turning eastward for Buffalo harbor.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

. . .it turns out Horace Greeley might not be the author, and John B. L. Soule, who may have been, had some harsh ideas about people.

I use it as explanation for something new I’m doing.  Today I head over toward the pushpin to the right . . . Narragansett Bay, where I board a small passenger ship that has hired me as onboard lecturer.  By July 12, we expect to be in Chicago via the route indicated.  I am thrilled!  The red dots are overnight stops, and the greenish ones are daytime stops for such tasks as lowering and raising the wheelhouse.

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Here was Grande Mariner along the west side of Manhattan back in May 2016,

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and here are two shots of her sister vessel farther upstate taken in 2013 and 2014.

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The challenge I’m giving myself is to post each day of the westward journey, using photos from that day.  Note that these ships with telescoping wheelhouse are truly Eriemax, designed to carry 100 souls along inland waterways on weeks-long voyages.  My job is to present lectures every other day on topics ranging from wars along these waterways to 19th century canal fever to the storied and obscure cast of characters who lived along the waterways (e.g.., Seeger, Fulton, Rockefeller, Freed, Stanton, Tecumseh, Brock, Hanks) . . .    to –of course–the variety of shipping working there.

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In a way, it’s a 21st century version of the D & C route for which there’s the poster below.

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If you don’t hear from me for a few days, just know I’m hoping to be somewhere along that route.

Part of the way up in the Chesapeake watershed, Roaring Bull works daily for the better part of the year.   Take a ride on it.  from Harrisburg I-81, it’s a mere 30 miles north.  From West Milton I-80, 40 miles south.

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Baltimore . . . 100 miles, Philly 130, NYC 200, and Pittsburgh 225;  and

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and it’s lost in time.

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It’s a must-see, and inspected by the USCG.

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Unlike double ended ferries, this one has the best bow and stern thrusters.

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with a name that conjures up this taurus pining for love. 

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And yes, it’s in a part of the Susquehanna River valley where there are lots of horses pulling buggies.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  For sights and sounds of the ferry under way, click here and here.

Here are the previous ones.

One of the joys of driving is the serendipity–even if guided . . . thanks, GT–of noticing the entirely unexpected, like the device below.  Any ideas?  If GT hadn’t mentioned this, I probably would not have thought twice about this weathered industrial object.  And it’s for sale.  For the right price, it can be on your boat.

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A clue is that the device above is located geographically between the tin building below and Boston, where this road trip ends.   The tin building is Gallery 53 on Rocky Neck.  I’m guessing it once had a seafood related purpose.

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A bit down the coast is Salem.  The brick building with cupola in the distance is the old Custom House, where Nathaniel Hawthorne once worked.

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I had forgotten that this replica is Hudson River built. There was a trade with China already 200 years ago.

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I’ll have to come back to the North Shore when all these vessels–Adventure, Friendship, and Fame–are sailing.

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Continuing southward . . . we arrive in East Boston, and Jake.

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Here’s another device on a rooftop.  Fiat Topolino?

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If you know the area, you’ll guess I’ve been heading south on 1A, and now I’ve parked and am walking over the McArdelle Bridge.  Anyone know anything about that red vessel that looks a bit like Augie?

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My tour of Luna recently is what lured me to this area around Chelsea Creek.  Here’s Luna resplendent.

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Anyone know the story of JW Powell?

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And the red and the white sailing vessels farthest from the camera here?

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Over yonder is Aegean Sea, formerly of the seas of the sixth boro.

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This bullnose will likely never again see the water.

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And here we are at the end of this stretch of road . . . it’s Roxbury High Fort aka the Cochituate Standpipe.

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So here we are . . . it’s a whistle from the SS United States!  Are there any developments in her refurbishing?  For some interior shots of her I took two years ago, click here.   Here are some other photos taken on the SS United States.

As to the particulars on the whistle, here’s what I learned this morning from SW:  “The whistle from the United States is a Leslie Tyfon, size 300DVE-5.  [Click on that link to hear one of these.]  It was purchased in 1986 by my uncle at auction I believe through Marine Technologies  Brokerage Corp. out of N.Y.   We have a letter of authenticity and it is currently for sale to the best offer.  Last recorded offer was $10,000.00.  We feel it is much more valuable.  It was on of three steam whistles from the forward stack of the ocean liner.  My uncle purchased the large forward whistle.  Thanks for your curiosity.”

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All photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

Many thanks to GT for the heads up and to Steve for the info on whistle.

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