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I think today is a holiday.  Somewhere.  If it weren’t, it just should be.

Actually it’s Children’s Day in Turkey.  And the Feast of St George at the Vatican and in England.  Slay-a-Dragon Day somewhere.  International Talk like Shakespeare Day . . . I could go on.  Feadship’s Casual Water is headed upriver, if not uptown.

Others are going in all directions . . .

mostly southbound.

Grande Mariner was westbound on the East River to get southbound to the River City. Know that place?

Some are Sound bound, and

others like Ma Belle are headed La Belle Province.

I can’t keep track of Elizabeth.

Flowers are blooming and

it’s great out.  Make time to enjoy the holiday.  Oh . . . River City starts here.

All photos in the past few days by Will Van Dorp, who did the first “spring giddiness” here.

Thanks for all the guesses, and here are some photos from the past week.  This was taken at the outset of a steep grade descending into St. Joseph de la Rive and the Isle aux Coudres ferry.

See the ship in the ice between the mainland and the island above;  farther upstream here’s a closer up of Algoma Mariner, and here

an even closer look at what constant ice against the bow does to the paint.

And here’s the winter version of yesterday’s post, looking back at Quebec City.  Some of you were right even down to the street address of the pier.

And traversiers aka ferries between Quebec City and Levis. 

Yes, I love winter.  And this is southern Quebec.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.   For more previous Saint Lawrence photos on tugster, click here.   For photos from Jean Hémond, a Quebecois whose expertise is this environment, click here.

I visited Southport once before, six years ago, when I met a wonderful gentleman who showed off his 1938 restored fishing boat Solomon T, here.

This time a small dredge operation was going on near shore, involving P&L’s Hercules.  Also

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there was Sea Oak (whose fleet mates have some great names here)  and

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Candice L.  Thanks to SM.

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Also, working on the project was crew boat Captain Tom.

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I plan to get back to Southport in late spring.

Part of my interest here is explained by this book:  Masters of the Shoals. 

 

 

Georgetown is South Carolina’s second largest port.  More on that in a moment, but for now, here’s an intriguing photo from the South Carolina Maritime Museum in town.  Where in New York was this steam houseboat built, I wonder.  In the Santee Gun Club notes, it reports that it took four months to deliver Happy Days from NY to Santee.  And, are they standing on ice here?

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Here’s what I saw of commercial vessels in port.  In the background is

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the now-shuttered ArcelorMittal steel plant.  Beyond the steel plant is International Paper mill, clearly quite busy. The mill grew out of the Atlantic Coast Lumber Company.

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I mentioned the maritime museum:  it’s worth a stop.  Also, check out the Gullah Museum.

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This intriguing artifact is outside, with the story

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here and below.   What’s misleading about the photo below is that the propeller is from the Norwegian freighter Eriksson, which at 285′ was smaller than the whaleback Everett, 346′.

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From Auke Visser, here are many more photos of City of Everett.

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One thing I found surprising about the history of Georgetown is its connections with Maine shipbuilders.

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You can guess how this encounter between the 168′ 506 ton four-master and the 403′ 6026 ton steamer turned out.  Read about the findings of the court in reference to the collision here. Click here for more info on SS Prinz Oskar, which became Orion after the US seized it.

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Will Van Dorp, who’s heading back to Georgetown in the spring, took the photos here both inside the museum and along the boardwalk.

*** Click here for the archive of the “early history of the Santee Club


		

I’m doing a short post today, but it may be big in questions.  First of all, Goat Locker?  It’s a name rich in tradition.  Click here and make sure to read the reference by Mark D. Faram.

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So, 1200 hp on the stern of large RIB .  .  . That’s impressive.

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And then there’s this, the ONLY boat in North Cove.  Here’s what the website says it’s for.  Read what it says here about the use of this 25′ SAFE, i.e.,  “Plan B maintains your Military RHIB boat and keeps it fueled, maintained and ready to go. Then, in the event evacuation is required, you simply proceed to your boat’s Westside location.”  Wow . . . James Bond?

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Some six hundred miles farther south in Southport, NC . . . No Wake dwells in a wholly different climate.  It’s a nice boat, although I know nothing about it.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous posts in this series go back almost seven years.

 

We’ve seen this vessel before here, although not as much of it, and  there’s more on it at the end of this post.

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She looks to have at least a 400 hp.

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Happy holidays . . .

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To be fair, I did not see her underway, although I’d love to have.

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These photos were taken last week in Southport, NC.  Here’s more info on Bay Queen: built in Orange, TX in 1941 as NOKA (YN 54), later DORIS LOVELAND , RUSSELL 16*, and LIN CLAY.  She underwent conversion at Willoughby Spit, VA about 1994.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

*The name Russell 16 has been used for more than one boat.

This is my Janus post . . . which I’ll start with a photo I took in January 2007 of an intriguing set of sculptures, since licensed to Trinity Church in Manhattan.

Since I’ve tons to do today, comment will be minimal.  The photo below I took near the KVK salt pile on January 14, 2016.  Eagle Ford, to the right, has since been scrapped in Pakistan.

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The history of Alnair, photo taken in Havana harbor on February 4, 2016, is still untraced.  It looks like an ex-USN tug.  Click here for more Cuban photos.

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This photo of JRT Moran and Orange Sun I took on March 12.

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This photo of Hudson was taken in Maassluis, very near where my father grew up,  on April 4. Many more Maassluis photos can be found here.

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Sandmaster I photographed here on May 6.  since then, she’s moved to Roatan, I’m told, and I’d love to go there and see how she’s doing.  Maybe I can learn some Garifuna while I’m there.

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June 1, I took this, with Robert E. McAllister and an invisible Ellen escorting Maersk Idaho out the door.

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July 14, I saw GL tug Nebraska yank bulkier Isolda with 56,000 tons of corn through a narrow opening and out the Maumee.

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August 23 I caught Atlantic Sail outbound past a nearly completed Wavertree.  And come to think of it, this is a perfect Janus photo.

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September 9 at the old port in Montreal I caught Svitzer Montreal tied up and waiting for the next job.

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October 18, I caught Atlanticborg and Algoma Enterprise down bound between Cape Vincent and Clayton NY.

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November 4, while waiting for another tow, I caught Sarah Ann switching out scrap scows in the Gowanus.

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And I’ll end this retrospective Janus post with a mystery shot, which I hope to tell you more about in 2017.  All I’ll say is that I took it yesterday and can identify only some of what is depicted. Anyone add something about this photo?

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I feel blessed with another year of life, energy, gallivants, and challenges.  Thank you for reading and writing me.  Special thanks to you all who sent USPS cards !  I wish everyone a happy and prosperous 2017.   Here’s what Spock would say and where he got it.

Here was my “last hours” post from 2015.  And here from the year before with some vessels sailing away forever.   And here showing what I painted in the last hours of 2013.  And one more with origins “oud jaardag” stuff from the finale of 2011.

Apologies if you received a premature version of this post;  I hit the wrong button.

“Light” here refers not to load but to sunshine and clouds.  These photos were taken just below Algiers Point in unsettled December weather.  Some buildings of New Orleans are visible on the horizon to the left.

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These photos of Capes Kennedy and Knox were taken

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about an hour apart.  As part of the Ready Reserve fleet, they can be deployed with five days’ notice.

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SFL Kent–photos taken about an hour apart–as of this posting, she’s en route

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to Morocco.

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Notice the EO on the stack beyond the starboard side of SFL Kent?

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It’s Alice‘s sister Elsa!

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UBC Saiki is currently in Veracruz.

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These photos were taken within minutes of each other.

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Since this photo was taken, Century Royal has sailed to the DR.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

These photos I took over three different days as we entered Oswego and then overnighted in Amsterdam, NY . . .  that is.

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Robert S. Pierson arrived after we did, discharged over a dozen thousand tons of salt, and left soon after dawn.

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A horseshoe dam at Minetto was swollen.

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The morning departing Sylvan Beach was

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red, a warning, and yes it rained much of the day.

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Dredging went on near Rome–BB 153, T2, and Hydraulic Dredge No. 5.

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And at Utica, the was T4 and the dragon (?) dredge.

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There were two eagles in this tree, but they refused to fit nicely in a single frame.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos.

 

 

You saw this vessel in an earlier post.  It’s back from the Arctic for the season, most likely.

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We steamed through the night, so here’s our vessel already in Ogdensburg on a rainy morning. The river separating the US from Canada here is about a mile wide.

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There was a time when folks who backed the wrong horse fled the US as refugees.

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The land you see in the background is US.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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