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Here was 17.  Short post today, with one foto only from l’amica dalla torre,  who treats me sometimes with sights my eyes miss.    Like this vessel below, which showed up on AIS as Ocean, but

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in fact is known as Ocearch.  Here and here are some links to its organization and mission.  Here’s a link showing a great white on deck.

I’m no idea why they’re in the North River.  Maybe they heard this vessel (fourth foto)  had been in the sixth boro?

My plan this morning had been to get fotos if an assemblage of Miss Emily, Miss Gloria, and Charleston were still in Gravesende Bay, but by daybreak, they’d disappeared, at least from AIS.

L’amica . . . grazie.

Here and here are some fotos from previous winter fish seasons in the sixth boro.  This post from January 2010 probably shows the greatest number of sixth boro fishing boats I’ve ever seen.  Below was a foto I took at Gravesend Bay last week.

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Alexa J,

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Linda,

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Linda and Mary Virginia,

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an unidendified boat and Lobster Boy,

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Linda and Lobster Boy,

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Related in their scales, here’s a photoessay on fishing in SW Alaska, and here’s one about a big catch near Detroit.

Three years ago I did posts about wooden vessels and names while in the greater Cape Ann area.  This time what struck me was the variety of vessels in this small but intensely important peninsula.  Essex Shipbuilding Museum is always “must stop there” . . . and make a donation if you wish.  Essex has fewer than 4000 people.   Treat yourself to beautiful lines fleshed out in old  . . .

and new like these.

Speak of random tugs, it’s YTL-438, built on City Island, NY,  in 1944, Nicholas T today.

I can’t hear the word “Gloucester” without thinking of fish and lobsters and other sea life.  Read what Capt Joey has to say about Western Venture, here with Osprey. Joey’s GMG does “citizen journalism” par excellence on many aspect of Gloucester life, and a more historically focused website on Gloucester industry can be found here.

Vessels old and

new–like these three midwater trawlers of Western Sea Fishing– line the piers when they’re not at sea.   It no secret that fishing brings risks:  a vessel I featured here three years ago–Plan B-- sank earlier this year.

Small and newish like Cat Eyes or

or classic, versatile, and large like 1924 Highlander Sea (for sale)  and 1926 Adventure both Essex built . . .  they all lie in the few dozen acres of water in Gloucester’s Inner Harbor.   See Adventure‘ s site here and some fun fotos here.

Treats appear at every glance, near and far.

Can anyone tell me more about Traveler . .  and all her lives?  Here’s what I learned from Good Morning Gloucester:  follow the comments and you’ll learn that she was launched in “1942 by Cambridge Ship Builder, Inc. based in MD, for the US Army. She is 79.9 ft. long, was a rescue boat serving in WWII picking up downed fighter pilots and had full infirmary facilities aboard.”

More Gloucester tomorrow.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who realizes he should come back here more often.   And if you’ve never been to Cape Ann, sooner is better.

First, check “parrotlect flickrstream” along the left margin here for my favorite 45 fotos from the start of the Great Chesapeake Schooner Race last week.  I had posted some of them earlier, but put them up in the moment and without the benefit of my “foto-cleanup” tools.

Here is the real predecessor for this post . . . small specialized East coast designs.  And here’s a question . . . guess the loa and beam of this vessel.  Answer and fotos follow.

 Some small craft are just beautiful . . .  sweet

not to emphasize the “just” there.  Seriously sweet lines here.

And here. And nearby but in the shadows was a twin called Puffin.   And that vintage Johnson Sea horse 18 was attached to the

the prettiest motorboat I’ve ever seen.  I don’t think that Johnson comes with the blender attachment seen here!!

This is Silk.  Silk is a pushboat.  Believe it or not, it’s the prime mover for a 65′ skipjack, and while hauling for oysters, Silk needs to be hanging high and dry.  I regret I didn’t get a chance to look at the engine.

Stanley Norman dates from 1902.  And that boom looks impossibly long.

And here’s a surprise, maybe.  The vessel in the top foto here is a restored 1925 Hooper Island Draketail named Peg Wallace, measuring a belief-defying 37’6″ loa with a beam of only 6’8″!!  I’d written of local Chesapeake and southern boats here almost two years ago, but this was my first encounter with a draketail.  Scroll down to pete44′s comment here to learn his sense of the origin of the design.

I’d love to see her move through the water.

Draketail . . .  named for a duck.  Make way!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

So I was an especially gullible kid who wished in vain that my parents would let me buy some sea monkeys that I saw advertised in Popular Mechanics.  Never happened.    Hold that thought.

Below is a foto of the Great Salt Lake.  And before I came here, I’d heard that it stunk and held

no life.  But how

then was it also a major bird migration path. 

Doubleclick on this foto and see all the birds.  And yes the water near shore was black with flies and other insects that–unlike gnats–disperse when you approach.  All this brings up this

display outside Dave’s Gonzo Kayak rental on Antelope Island. To my amazement, I learned that Great Salt Lake has a fishery and this is an older, obsolete vessel used in the harvesting of brine shimp . . .

aka sea-monkeys!!  Click here for a foto of a more up-to-date vessel, the likes of which I’d love to see.

Click here for a feature from High Country News on the fishery, here for the site of the GSL Brine Shrimp Cooperative, and here for some starter economics on the industry.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Sometimes along the road, I see things I don’t understand.    The first two fotos here, though, I can identify but just won’t right now.  Hazard guesses about this fish?

 . . . and the current usage of this vessel?  Answers soon.

This is a poor foto shot from the roadway where I couldn’t stop, but it looks like fishing weir tenders removing trapped fish?  Click to enlarge.

Here, from a place I could stop is a weir with nets visible.   I call them weirs, but maybe other terms are used along the mid-Atlantic coast

Here was my northbound conveyance . . . ferry Twin Capes, which I saw in the sixth boro here (fotos 4 and 5) two years ago.    Nah . . . it wasn’t lost or in fugitive mode;  it was headed for Caddell Dry Dock.

Now . . . I kid you not, but let me say I saw a ray in Delaware Bay (sounds like the beginning of a song?) but didn’t even try to take a foto.  Maybe that’s a ray’s mouth motif on the bow of that pilot boat, which just

retrieved the pilot from Fivelborg, Quebec-bound.  You need to see this foto of her on shipspotting!!

Following Fivelborg was this container ship, and I have no idea who she is.   Any ideas . . . 10 to 15 miles behind Fivelborg outbound Delaware Bay?

Here’s the Cape May Light with the wreckage of SS Atlantus off Sunset Beach.

If this is a second life for this vessel parked on the shellrock surfaced marina, what was first life?

Two roads diverged in the New Jersey bayou (and I don’t mean that pejoratively) , and my GPS had no idea where I was or where I should go, and squadrons of tabanus nigrovittatuses aka greenheads knew exactly where their blood food was.   Squadrons of squadrons!!

But I braved them to sneak a quick look at 1927 FV Louise Ockers!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  More on the two unanswered Qs at the beginning soon.

Here’s my summertime post from almost a year ago;  it’s still spring in the sixth boro, although spring 2012 has made for a mostly sultry season and a lush KVK.  Thomas J. Brown tows

an irregular load.

And with a warm winter and sultry spring, bugs

are so big and hungry I fear to swat.

John P. Brown pushes along a many-wheeled barge, and if you want a scene for a Stephen King horror story by the name of Maximum Overboard or somesuch, you know this crane

could proceed to scoop this fish out of the water.

The start of summer is a holiday for the Dutch (even those who live in Brooklyn and dally with crocs), when they do this with herring, and elsewhere

in Brooklyn, it’s time for

who knows who to transform in mermaze!!

All fotos by will Van Dorp.

Thomas D. Witte . . . I did nothing to manipulate this image, no liquification, no DAP . . .

Yet another Mighty Servant 1 foto with four movers of the Miller’s Launch fleet.    As of this writing, the Mighty is still anchored at the Narrows.  Bravo on what appears to have been a flawless loading.

Gustav Schulte passes the loading on a very slow bell, partly because of the tow happening off its port bow also.

I’m not sure what this tow is . . . Sea Lion (?) and a thousand feet tailing it.  The tail boat may be Iron Wolf.    Can anyone help?

December means fishing on the sixth boro . . . here’s a newcomer for me . . . Mary Virginia (ex-Maazee).

Irish Sea moves a barge into the Bay.

Eagle Baltimore and Liechtenstein swing on the hook.

Crystal Cutler does too.

Shearwater motors out the east end of KVK headed, I believe, for North Cove.

Crystal Marie exits the Narrows.

Happy last day of Fall 2011.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  And this just in . . . as of noon today, Mighty Servant 1 exited the Bay Nigeria-bound.  I hope the good folks on Meagan Ann get a foto they will share.

Here was Birds 4.  Birds intrude on these fotos a fair amount just because they do.  I usually don’t intend bird fotos, but like the second from bottom here, they happen and make intriguing juxtaposition.  Vastly different proximity of bird and vessel sometimes  makes for apparently huge birds and new ways of seeing, as in the fotos of Julia Fullerton-Batten.

The same is true here;  helicopter and building here are several miles apart, but it did give pause.  And I was wondering whether it would alight upon some platform at the top.

But sometimes birds distract me from my usual subject.  Indulge me and take two minutes to watch this two-minute vimeo called “murmuration,” starting out with two girls in a canoe on a lake in Ireland.  If you’ve already seen it, pass it along to someone.

But back to my egret, who was tense, then slack, then tense, calculating … until

the fish seemed in range.

It came up empty-billed, but no matter.  There was plenty in the world beneath the boom to attract them with food, which reinforced the faith and patience of the egret.

Not the best shot, but a fairly typical one of a great blue heron, a timid bird that departs with very annoyed squawks.

Here’s another shot of an osprey I included here about two months ago, third foto from last.  To me this one suggests bird on fish like surfer on board.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.   And seriously, if you didn’t watch that vimeo . . . it’ll make your day.  Thanks to Maureen for sending it my way.  To me, it rivals the amazingvirtualreal  sequences in Avatar, the movie.  Here’s another bird/water video.

Late tonight I anticipate strolling through Penn Station as part of my transit from work to sleep; usually I run, but on Halloween it means the parade has wound down and that all types of creatures will inhabit that transit ecolabyrinth.  Halloween in New York and most places in the US produces a mix of the grotesque, macabre, sexy, and just plain bizarre.  This post is intended to mirror the spectrum of the menagerie I expect to see tonight.  Meanwhile, to see Halloween aboard MV Algolake, go to their Faceboook site. 

Start with the raised Helen Parker, which capsized and sank off Manhattan earlier in the month.  These fotos come thanks to Jerseycity Frankie.   No one was physically hurt, although

feelings certainly suffered.   Here’s more on the story.

Halloween critters in Penn tonight will be diverse, hard to identify.  Any thoughts on this foto I took yesterday?

Seatrout . . . here she be!  I’ll bet they don’t serve smoked salmon on board.

Taken yesterday also . . . right near where some fisherman pulled out a 37″ striper.  Guesses?

Misplaced oculus?

It’s Tsereteli!  Enjoy these other manifestations of the Georgian sculptor.  He might write his name as  ზურაბ წერეთელი  . . .  that kind of Georgian.

In any parade, some costumes are simply unidentifiable by the uninitiated.  Like this, which stands as a piece of post-industrial sculpture just behind the A&P in Bergen Point Bayonne, between Elco Boat Basin and the old Esso yard.  Can anyone identify its former use?  Speaking of the old Esso yard, here’s an old piece of British newsreel showing response and cleanup after a quite tragic June 1966 tanker collision and explosion there.    Here’s the NTSB report.

Here’s a foto I took yesterday, tribute to the surprise pre-Halloween snowfall.  APL Qatar was about to be backed down for departure for sea.   More fotos of Qatar soon.

OK, this was a season and a half ago, harbinger of a pre-Samhain snowfall.  Get ready for indian summer.  Beginning of summer 2011–Coney Island style–was documented here, here, and here.

Finally, here’s another shot from the Lady Liberte parade.  If you haven’t done so already, check out bowsprite’s reaction  . . . at least  . . . to this vessel being in town.  “Lightship” just doesn’t have the energy of the name for this class of vessel in some other languages:  for example in Danish, it’s a fyrskib.  See fyrskibs and much much more here.

Top two fotos come from Jerseycity Frankie . ..  all others by will Van Dorp.

Here’s last year’s Halloween post about a trip to Issuma.  Issuma today is off Alaska after having sailed east to west across the Northwest Passage!! And I could have taken a leave and gone with . . . ah silly me.

Latest word on MV Algolake and the Great Lakes in general, looks like I’ll spend Thanksgiving with my sister in Michigan, after stopping briefly in Toledo and Detroit.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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