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This is day 8 of the GHP&W series, so let me break pattern a bit.  If you missed the beginning, GHP&W is not a law firm; it’s abbrev for “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves.”  I haven’t dusted off any wharves yet, but two-thirds of the months still lie ahead.

The story here is that TS Kings Pointer was out serving as a training platform and not at Kings Point, although there was a potential meeting somewhere south along our track to Portsmouth, VA.

Mile 1, 0738 Wednesday, heading for the Throg’s Neck Bridge.

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0756.  Passing SUNY Maritime and TS Empire State. Click here for photos from her summer sea term 2015.

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0804, Robert Burton, a Norfolk boat.

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0907, Mary Gellatly with a sand scow at the southern tip of Governors Island.

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1010, passing the northern tip of Sandy Hook but looking back at Naval Weapons Station Earle, with USNS Medgar Evers at the wharf.

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1017, Romer Shoal Light and Coney Island.

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1517, Capt. Willie Landers northbound off Beach Haven, I think.

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1612, FV Jonathan Ryan and tug Pops in the distance.

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1618, entering a grid marked “numerous scientific buoys.”

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1657 off Atlantic City, with unidentified tug and barge

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1740 and about to switch watch.

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Thursday, 0852, looking north into the Chesapeake after going wide around Fisherman Island.

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0910 . . . it’s the current  TS Kings Pointer, ex-Liberty Star. . .

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. . . heading along Virginia Beach

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before turning northward toward Long Island Sound.  Her former sister ship–Freedom Star–was in the area but we did not see her.

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Meanwhile, we head north into the Thimble Shoal Channel Tunnel and into port, which you can follow tomorrow.  And that tug and crane barge in the distance . . . survey work for new infrastructure or maintenance dredging?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to the USMMA Sailing Foundation for inviting me to crew in winter relocation for Tortuga.  It was a smooth trip.

GHP&W 3.   And I don’t mean the northern Staten Island area named for a developer with the first name George.

As the lobster might suggest, this St. George is in Maine, and named for the river which is named for the English explorer/captor of Squanto who visited this area in 1607.   I was confused the first time I arrived here because I was looking for Port Clyde and all the signs said was “St. George.”

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But it turns out that within the town of St. George are villages like Tennants Harbor, Martinsville, and Port Clyde.

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I hope to return to Port Clyde next year, in part because this is the mainland wharf for the Monhegan Boat Line.  Elizabeth Ann was preparing for the passenger run, but

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I didn’t get to see the “world-famous Laura B,” a repurposed 1943 Army T-boat, which after doing WW2 duty in the Pacific, ran lobsters from Maine to Boston and New York. Anyone know of old NYC sixth-boro photos of Laura B delivering Maine fruits of the sea to the city?   Laura B was working, delivering freight to Monhegan.  And these cargo nets filled with firewood await for the next cargo run.

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A glance at a map or chart of the peninsulas of Maine is enough to explain the value of craft like Reliance and her sisters.

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The work boats in the harbor represent only part of the “gear” needed to fish;  the rest is on paper.

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Even on rainy days, I like looking at these boats.  Taking photos of paperwork  . . . never so much.

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From a short conversation of the wharf, I have the sense that the paperwork and regulations keep vessels like these in port many more days than they fish. And global water temperature trends make this an even harder way to earn a living.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who wants to get back up here soon.

 

Here was the previous post.

It was all highlights while taking two ferries to get from Long Island to my destination, but here are some photos.  I left Orient Point along with small fishing boats like Fishy Business, 1995 built.

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North Star, built in 1968 as an offshore supply vessel, was purchased by Cross Sound Ferry in 1984 and converted to an auto/passenger ferry.

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As North Star arrived, the 2007 Plum Island left Orient for its namesake island.

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Hudson River-bound Grande Caribe (1997) cut across the Sound with its unique profile.

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Eventually the destination appears . . . the cliffs off the north side of Block Island.

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The unmistakeable Viking (1976) passes as we round the island toward New Shoreham.

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Interstate Navigation’s Block Island (1997) welcomes us into the old port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the index.

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Of course, it’s two boats, the sloop Clearwater tied up to the ex-NYC DEP skimmer Cormorant.  As I understand the situation, it’s on the market . . . again.

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I don’t know the date of this photo or the identity of the person showing scale.

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Dimensions are 114′ x 44′ x 10′

And here’s Clearwater pulling away.  But, before they cast off lines, their crew was on the dock checking

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this short nose sturgeon.  Now I can’t prove a connection between dead fish and TZ construction, but a few days ago I read this article at the Lohud site that included this paragraph:  “In June 2012, the fisheries service determined Tappan Zee construction would injure or kill some sturgeon but was “not likely to jeopardize the continued existence” of the fish. Under a federal permit issued to the Thruway Authority, two of each species can be killed during construction.”  I’m surprised such language exists in the paperwork.  And what happens if this limit is exceeded?

 

Well,  here’s another paragraph from the article:  “[Riverkeeper]  said 100 Atlantic and shortnose sturgeon have died since the start of construction in 2012. From 2009 to 2011, it said six sturgeon deaths were reported to the state Department of Environmental Conservation.”

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Here’s a statement of Cormorant‘s mission, now turned over to the USACE.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, back on June 12, 2015.

Janga Bork is NOT a Dutch fishing vessel, although the unusual (?) hull brings it to the top of this post.  The “L” prefix on the hull identifies it as Danish.

By the way, the aggressive newish spell checker always tries to change my preferred spelling of “sixth boro” to “sixth bork.”  You may have seen some “typos” I missed.  I’m very happy to learn that Bork is in fact the name of lovely Danish seaside town that I must visit one of these years.

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For (slightly dated) info on Dutch society and fish, click here.  For a thought-provoking op-ed piece by Paul Greenberg on the plight of US fishing industry, click here.   The “UK” on the trawler below, Sursum Cordo, identifies it as registered in Urk.   Fishing vessels from all over –see Stellendam below–bring their catch to Ijmuiden, just outside Amsterdam.

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Huge trawlers like Cornelis Vrolijk‘s  Carolien  . . . of Scheveningen–operate out of here as well.

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Here’s sister ship Scombrus.

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Smaller trawlers Seagull and Flamingo are sculptural.

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The “Z” on Flamingo stands for Zeebruge in Belgium.

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In a Den Helder drydock, it’s Grietje Hendrika by the top sign and St. Antonius (Belgian) in raised metal letters below.

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No surprise Dr. Maarten Luther is German.

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In the town of Haarlem, the fish merchant is one of the more recently built buildings.

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In the same square, this take on “blind justice” is a refreshing leap backwards.

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Noord Hinder lightship  . . . just over a half century old . . . reminds me of this lightship lost in the South American jungle.

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Another restored Dutch steam vessel Hydrograaf  has a name that reveals the mission for which it was launched over a century ago.

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I have more, but for now . . .  as the Dutch say . . . Stop.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I first had a photo of Eastern Welder here in a post from almost 7 years ago.  And I had the photo below all lined up back on the first day of the season, but I snapped it after my subject had left the frame.  Oh well, I put this here to show what the salt pile looked like–all tarped–before the ice season began.  Hundreds of thousands of tons of salt have moved in and out there since.  The white hulled vessel is Dutch Girl.  Here and here are more sixth boro fishing posts.

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And here’s our subject.    The photo above and below were taken on December 1, 2013.

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And the rest of these I took this past Sunday.

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It’s hard to believe the New York Bight can be so glassy smooth sometimes.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Personal disclosure:  I used to enjoy playing football, but I’ve never watched a Super Bowl game.  I certainly have no feelings at all about any team, any sport.  But with all this talk of seahawks and broncos on ground hog day, I’m not oblivious: ground pork meatballs will go in my lunch stew.  This morning over coffee I decided to look up the history of the two teams soon to engage in New Jersey.  So the first owner of the broncos originally (prior to 1960) had a team called the bears.   And one of the two first investors in the seahawks was a Ned Skinner, scion of the Skinner & Eddy shipyard in Seattle and himself last owner/operator of the Alaska Steamship Company.

Anyhow . . . enjoy this digressive post, one that zags and zigs through a number of critters–like Stolt Bobcat–I’ve seen in the past year, as

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well as this unusual logo on the side of a junked truck,

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first signs of winter on the sixth boro,

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my favorite fishing bird,

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a quite effective gull,

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my company atop a mountain in January River,

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disciples of a certain waterborne tagger along the KVK,

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the only good rat I’ve seen in a while over at Sal Polisi’s shop near South Street Seaport,

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a beached shark, and finally

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some docked rays struggling in the light of morning sun’s rays over by Owl’s Head.  And speaking of rays and ground hog . . .

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I’m guessing Staten Island and Punxsutawney pick on ground hogs just because there are no convenient bears or badgers around to consult about winter weather.

Last critter word here, see a sea hawk and a bronco go toe-to-toe here.

Here was an earlier critter post.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s now off to grind the pork.

Ooops!  here’s one more critter link . . . from gCaptain, an inside look at a cattle/livestock carrier.

And another loops!  Read this NJstarledger article about birds here.

Here was 30 minutes from another vantage point.  Yesterday I left for work early and had a half hour or so to kill from Fort Wadsworth.  Seeing Ital Laguna and CMA CGM Matisse leaving together convinced me to stop there.    Meanwhile a larger and

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smaller fishing boat arrive.  I recognize this boat, although I don’t know its name.  See it the last foot here.

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First Coast moves in from somewhere beyond Norton’s Point.

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Rays now rake across the top of the manifold on Freja Nordica as it enters the Narrows and

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passes an outbound Franklin Reinauer.

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Recognize the profile?

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It’s Ellen.   I’ve no horse that shakes harness bells to suggest I move along, but I know I have –if no promises to keep–then . .  work to do, appointments to meet.

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All fotos by Will Van Drop.

 

Here was the last fishing post I did.  Fishing is only a winter activity in the sixth boro.  Here Dutch Girl pulls a net past the French woman and

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then heads back.

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And this looks like Virginia Sue, she of classic lines.

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Enjoy.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who might have enough unused fishing fotos from Brazil to do another post about them.  I have got to check.

Here was a post I did in early spring 2013.  She went to Portland, Maine for the work, and this morning

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she returned to South Street Seaport Museum pier, about 36 hours travel out of Gloucester.

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The timing was perfect for me . . . as I’m currently reading A Dream of Tall Ships, Peter Stanford’s account of the years from 1965–1974, when as the subtitle of the book has it, a story of “how NYers came together to save the city’s sailing-ship waterfront.”  Well . . . round 1, at least.

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Lettie looked glorious in the morning sun, nestling back beside Ambrose, but I couldn’t help looking especially closely at the bow.  I’d just read this account the day before in Stanford’s book, a recollection about the vessel then-called Caviare in September 1968

“there was one thing that needed replacing, which not vital to the schooner’s structure, mattered a great deal to her appearance.  This was the gammon knee, an oak extension of the stem arching forward under the bowsprit, which nicely completes the sweeping curve of the clipper bow.  The old schooner’s gammon knee had been chopped back into a stump to allow a heavy rope fender to be slung under the bow when she’d been adapted for work as a tug.”

Wow!  That’s one old foto I’d love to see, this vessel, with a rope bow fender, pushing a barge.  Anyone have such a foto?

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Lettie‘s back, and so is this fleet.  Maybe Lettie‘d love to come out fishing with them?  Vessel in the distance is Pati R. Moran.   Brown fishboat in the foreground is Eastern Welder.

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All fotos this morning by Will Van Dorp.

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