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I’m always so grateful when folks send me photos, especially like all of these.  Tony A catches all kinds of boats I miss, like

Anne-Sofie earlier this month in Albany.  I’m not sure what the cargo in and/or out was, but these SAL vessels get around.   Does anyone know if that “float” center just under the crane hook serves as an outrigger for loading/unloading crane movement?  As of this posting, she’s already in Genoa.

Here’s more from Tony . . . Dimuro Clark had been Turecamo Girls for over half a century and appeared on this blog many times. 

 

I like their logo.

And finally, long-time reader and sometimes contributor, Tommy Bryceland sends these photos of a local boat–which appeared in yesterday’s post–far from homewaters,

with guided missile frigate and ex USS Boone on the hip in Campbeltown Loch in Scotland last week.  Atlantic Salvor towed it there from the Philadelphia Navy Yard.  The ship is expected to be used as a target in an upcoming live fire exercise out in the Atlantic Ocean.  Would the frigate be anchored during such an exercise?  I’m imagining it’s expected to sink upon termination of the firing.

Many thanks to Tony A and Tommy for sharing these photos.

Zee Bart sent some more photos from his vessel taken in December and January.

Orion 4 is a waterboat.  Here’s a translation of the function from the vessel website:  “The [business] Waterboat IJmuiden [pronounced eye MY den]  was founded by Mr. Jan Overvliet and his wife Tante Dien, captain and captain of the steam tugboat s.s. Orion in 1948. With the various steam tugs in the Netherlands, the tugs were regularly supplied with drinking water, which was loaded as ballast into the aft peak. Various potable water boats have emerged from these tugboat companies.”  This vessel, no longer steam powered,  was built in 1942 in Alphen a/d Rijn, NL.  She’s at the dock in Ijmuiden NL

The 2008 233′ x 52′ Vos Base is an anchor-handling supply vessel of a sort that might become more common in the sixth boro–less exotic–as the offshore windfarm industry evolves. Currently she’s at work at a North Sea wind farm.

The 2003 Belgian-flagged Manta has the same function and is slightly larger, 246′ 59′.  She’s currently on the North Sea.

 

Dutch ports have no shortage of these vessels.  This is the 2013 Kolga, 236′ x 62′. 

Diminished in size by the larger Kolga, the 1998 Fairplay 23 is a Polish-flagged assist tug slightly larger than those in the sixth boro, at 115′ x 36′. 

 

Isaac Newton, a 2015 build, is classified as an offshore supply ship, with dimensions of 453′ x 105′.  At the moment, Newton is in the South China Sea heading for Donghae ROK. 

Many thanks to Zee Bart for use of these photos.

Many thanks to Zee Bart for sending along these photos he took in Ijmuiden, the port where the locks are at the west end of the North Sea Canal, the waterway linking Amsterdam with the North Sea.  Check out the dredge.

 

This dredge started life as a container ship, Gerd!  After 78 days in drydock and 22,000 hours of skilled work, the container ship became a dredge.  See more detail here. Yed Prior is a star in the constellation of Ophiuchus.

Rollingstone is another conversion story, also spotted near Ijmuiden.

You can probably see what her earlier incarnation was when she worked for Dockwise . . . now Boskalis.

Of course, she was a semi-submersible heavy lift ship.  She was called Super Servant 1, and now she’s a pipe burying vessel. 

Thanks to Zee Bart for sending these along.  More Zee Bart (aka Sea Bart) here.

I have done “second lives” posts about transformations like these.

. .  or I could call this Scale, the next number in line.

Directly below, it’s Commander, the 140′ x 54′  escort tug on its way to Alaska in 2018.  Photo comes from my sister, of ketch Maraki.  She caught the tug off the east end of the Panama Canal.  More on Commander here.

And on the other extreme in size, here’s a cute little tugboat from Jerry Rice, who runs the Pirates on the Pungo races in Pamlico Sound . . .  more specifically in Belhaven, where I was born.  This tug reminds me of the very popular tug here from over 12 years ago.  The info on the “for sale” sign says “Francis Cox, 252-702-0623.”

And finally, from Jed, and taken a year and a half ago, it’s a Damen RSD 2513 tug.  RSD expands to “reversed stern drive.”  Specs are here.

photo date 17 june 2018

Innovation shows some innovative design.

photo date 17 june 2018

Many thanks to Lucy, Jerry, and Jed for these photos.  I’m also happy to share other folks’ photos.

75 was in Paris, so let’s stay there.  Many thanks to Lew for these photos from Paris.

Moving cargo on European rivers brings with it a very different lifestyle.  For starters, check out the Opel automobile nestled rear starboard abaft the house of Belcanto.  I posted many cars on barges before, as here, second photo.

The live aboard community is well-established in some old boats,

well-maintained but old boats. You too can rent a barge or a bed in one for your stay in Paris . . .   or London .  . . or Toronto . . . or for that matter, Timbuktu.

And Lew points out that the marine fire fighters are considered part of the French military.  I didn’t know that, but here’s corroboration.  Note the logo on the farther red-hulled boat.  Click here to read the resume of the current fire chief of the Paris Fire Brigade (BSPP).  Commandant Beinier appears to be a barracks barge, also called CS la Monnaie. Click here for a photo of the entire vessel.

I said it before, and I’ll repeat . . .

it’s high time I get back to Paris, where this place

would look different.

Thx much, Lew.

 

 

It’s been a while since I posted any of Jed’s shots, but I hold them to concentrate them rather than posting them one or two  at a time. Anyhow, of the photo below, Jed writes:  “[Atlas 1974] is my first Estonian tug . . . .” although this photo shows her in Dutch waters.

photo date 6 june 2015

Esvagt Connector (2000) is a prime example of a North Sea anchor-handling supply tug.

photo date 12 Jume 2015

The photo below provides a bit more context:  Esvagt Connector is towing a high voltage subsea station for the North Sea wind farm GODE SEA.  Assistance is provided by Esvagt Don and Smit Emoe. Click here for more of the Esvagt fleet, with some interesting names.

photo date 12 june 2015

Smit Emoe is a new boat for me.  Some previous Smit tugs posted on tugster can be found here.

photo date 12 June 2015

FairPlay X and a crewman take a wave while alongside MSC Venice,

photo date 16 sept 2016

here with a bit more context.

photo date 16 sept 2016

MTS Taktow is British built but with a Dutch language name.

photo date 11 june 2015

Let’s end this post with a boat on an entirely different continent:  it’s Yankee in the KVK.  Yankee worked for K-Sea when I first started this blog, but I believe I have no photos of her in that livery.

photo date 2 dec 2016

Many thanks to John Jedrlinic for these photos.

 

Any idea what SoG might be?  If you haven’t guessed by the end of this post, the answer will be listed there, along with credits.   You’ll agree with me that the assortment of containers are the same as you’d see on any back field along the edges of the sixth boro.

Kjella, 1957, I first thought was an unusually shaped tugboat, but better sources than myself say it’s a RORO ferry, located in the port of Algeciras.

From the Atlantida fleet in Algeciras . . . I believe this is Paquita Moreno. 

From the Boluda fleet, it’s Sentosa Ocho.

Also from Atlantida, it’s Bay Explorer, unusually English in name.

The Tangier fishing fleet here is definitely NOT catching any fish.

Charif al Idrissi was launched in 1986 and serves as a fisheries parol vessel based in Agadir.

Here’s a closeup of the stack design.

Jaguar is part of the Amasus fleet out of Delftzijl, shown here headed for the Atlantic.  For more photos, click here.

Over at the OILibya dock in the port of Tangier is a tug registered in Malabo (Equatorial Guinea) but I can’t quite make out the name.  Anyone help?  As an international ship register, Equitoguinea has 40 vessels, fewer than Bolivia.

SoG . . . Strait of Gibraltar, or Jabal Ṭāriq if you wish.

And the photos–taken on both sides of the Strait–come thanks to JED, not to be confused with Jed.  JED first commented here exactly 10 years and one day ago.  And I’ve always been grateful for his contributions.

 

These photos come via Jan van der Doe and were taken by Jan Oosterboer in the Lekhaven area of Rotterdam.

Lingestroom, a Damen Shoalbuster 3512 design and launched in 2017, measures 114′ x 39′ and is powered by triple screw driven by three Caterpillar C32-TTA SCAC.

Unrelated, notice the stack for the Atlanship SA orange juice tanker on the far side of the building?  I’m not sure which tanker that is.

MTS Indus is 82′ x 24.’    More info here.  Just beyond Indus and against the dock is MTS Vanquish, a 2909 Stantug design from Damen.

Sea Bronco is a SeaContractor tug with two Caterpillar 3508B engines.

En Avant 20 is a twin Schottel 5000 hp tug built in 2006.  I like the slogan on the building on the right side of the photo.

 

Union Princess is queen of the dock here:  221′ loa x 51′ and powered by two Wärtsilä 16v32 LND engines for a total of just over 16,000 hp.

Dian Kingdom measures 107′ x 36.’

 

I hope you enjoyed this look around the dock in Lekhaven, thanks to Jan and Jan.  For the first seven in the series, click here.

 

Low bridge, lower air draft, refrigeration box on the cargo area, hand cart loaded with boxes . . . that’s how your food and drink must be delivered in Venice. Notice in white letters forward on the reefer box . . . “order and delivery” in Italian.

Here are two more such cold delivery boats.

As to the green groceries . . . you pick what you want from the shelves of this boat.  Bumboats they’d be in some places.  Parlevinkers in other places.  I’m not sure what they call the boats at floating markets on the Mekong, or what the Italian word for these is . . . .

 

Then there are the water buses and taxis.

 

And if I’m not mistaken, this is the dock that provides transport between the Marco Polo Airport and  town.  Note the luggage.  Also, note the location of the radar.

 

And where there’s people, law enforcement is needed as well. The photo below comes thanks to Tommy Bryceland.

All other photos come thanks to Jonathan Steinman.

And I truly need to plan a trip to Venice, along with lots of other places.

I’ve never been to Venice, a fact I’d love to remedy soon;  maybe I have to visit it soon.  The third photo in this recent post about lighthouses had a mystery location.  Congratulations to Tommy Bryceland, who guessed it was Venice.

Since large ships do call in Venice, there must be rimorchiatori aka tugboats, like Ida C.  Click here and work with the language to see their whole fleet.  Of course, you’d expect gondolas, with their 1000-year-old design.  Gondolas, whether in Minnesota or NY or Las Vegas,  appear all similar.  Given the connection between Marco Polo and Asia to the east, I wonder if there was design influence with the beams I recall seeing among marsh Arabs in southern Iraq . .. .

Here’s a better profile of an unusual cruise ship, Wind Star.  

More rimorchiatori in the Grand Canal the day Jonathan was out there with his camera include Marina M C

 

 

and Clara C.

All photos thanks to Jonathan Steinman, some of whose previous photos on tugster can be found here.   A previous post with photos on the water in Venice can be found here.

For the full set of rimorchiatori da Venezia, click here.

The cargo port is to the west of old city.

 

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