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It’s still November 2015, so for me, it’s day 22 of this focus.

Let’s head south again from Hampton Roads, where a lineup of MSC vessels includes a supply vessel called Supply.

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I guess this would be a small Navy yard tug.  Click here (and scroll) to see a variant with roll bars.   Here it closes the security gate after a Moran tug has come inside.

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More security is provided by WPB-87329 Cochito.

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In order from near to far on this foggy day are LSD-46 Tortuga, DDG-103 Truxton, and USNS T-AH-20 Comfort.

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Emily Anne McAllister (2003) waits at the Norfolk International Terminals.

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And there’s a long list of commercial tugboats, more than I want to squeeze into this post.  So let’s start with Ocean Endeavor (1966),

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Night Hawk (1981),

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Dauntless II (1953),

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Choptank (2006),

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Payton Grace Moran (2015),

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Goose Creek (1981), and finally for now

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Steven McAllister (1963).

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All foggy/rainy photos above by Will Van Dorp.

One of these days we’ll meander farther south on the Elizabeth River aka ICW.  In the meantime, if you have photos of work vessels from any port huge or tiny, get in touch;  there are still a few days of November left.

And since we’re a week or so from December, my idea for next month’s collaboration is “antique/classic” workboats, functioning or wrecked.  Of course, a definition for that category is impossible.  For example, NewYorkBoater says this:  “The definition of an antique boat according to Antique and Classic Boating Society is a boat built between 1919 and 1942.  A classic was built between 1943 and 1975 and the term contemporary, are boats built from 1976 and on.”  Hmm . . . what do you call an old vessel built before 1919 . . . a restoration project?  antediluvian?

 

If you take another transportation sector–automobiles, you get another definition:  25 years old or more.    And for the great race, here were the rules for this year:  “Vehicle entries must have been manufactured in 1972 or before.”  Next year’s cut-off will likely be 1973.

So my flexible definition is  . . . photo should have been taken in 1999 or before, by you or of you or a family member, and in the case of a wreck, probably identifiable.  Exception . . .  it could be a boat built before  . . . say  . . . 1965.

This post is a direct follow-up to one I did a week ago, documenting the 270-nm trip from Kings Point NY to Norfolk aboard USMMA Sailing Foundation vessel Tortuga.  This post documents the second and final leg of the trip to Tortuga‘s winter berth in New Bern NC, a 179-nm trip from Norfolk.

Let’s start here.  Departure time on day 1 is 1100 h. If you think the navy vessel in dry dock looks familiar, well . . . it visited the sixth boro in May 2012, and I toured the ship DDG 57 USS Mitscher at that time here.

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A USN presence is pervasive along the Elizabeth river portion of the ICW, but the Norfolk Naval Ship is

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technically in Portsmouth. The vessel above is AS 41 USS McKee

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Click here and here for info on the Elizabeth River, technically a tidal estuary.  Click on the map below to get interactivity.

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Here McLean Contracting Co. tug Fort Macon works on the replacement of the Steel Bridge in Chesapeake VA.

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I was surprised to learn there’s a lock in the ICW, the Great Bridge Lock.  I was even more surprised to learn the USACE contracts the operation and maintenance of the lock to a company called US Facilities.

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I must read more about the ICW, but in WW2 it proved a safe route for commerce when enemy submarines preyed on vessels offshore.

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Paradise Creek pushes oil along the ICW today; when I started this blog,  it was a regular workhorse in the sixth boro of NYC.

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The color of ICW water is determined by natural tannins.

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The ICW is composed of wide open bays and sounds–which have narrow channels-as well as narrow cuts.   Here Evelyn Doris of the ICM fleet pushes a covered barge–soybeans, I’ll wager–northbound, possibly to Norfolk.

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Ahead is the US Rte 64 Bridge over the Alligator River, a swing bridge.

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Note the proximity of the photo above to the Atlantic Ocean.

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Tannins in the Alligator River water create this color.

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North Carolina today protects a lot of its coastal wetlands. Hunting is permitted, and in fact, VHF radio picked up a lot of communication with folks hunting in there.

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Parts of the ICW flow through cuts like the Alligator-Pungo Canal.

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This moment of arrival in Belhaven meant a lot to me, because just around the point in the center of the photo is the hospital where I was born. I hadn’t known it, but Belhaven also considers itself the birthplace of the ICW.

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Departure time on day 3 was 0600, Jupiter and Venus were higher in the sky than the rising sun.

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Aurora Mine looms over the Pamlico river. Potash export happens through Beaufort,  documented on tugster here and here a few years back.

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See the mine area on the south side of the Pamlico River below.

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Hunting abounds here.

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Note the spelling. 

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Belhaven used to support a fishing fleet.  I’ve no idea how the size of the fleet and market in Hobucken has fluctuated over the years.

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Day 3, early afternoon we depart the Neuse River for the Trent by passing through the Cunningham Drawbridge.

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Tortuga is docked here for winter.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Again many thanks to the USMMA Sailing Foundation for inviting me to crew in winter relocation for Tortuga.

This is day 8 of the GHP&W series, so let me break pattern a bit.  If you missed the beginning, GHP&W is not a law firm; it’s abbrev for “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves.”  I haven’t dusted off any wharves yet, but two-thirds of the months still lie ahead.

The story here is that TS Kings Pointer was out serving as a training platform and not at Kings Point, although there was a potential meeting somewhere south along our track to Portsmouth, VA.

Mile 1, 0738 Wednesday, heading for the Throg’s Neck Bridge.

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0756.  Passing SUNY Maritime and TS Empire State. Click here for photos from her summer sea term 2015.

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0804, Robert Burton, a Norfolk boat.

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0907, Mary Gellatly with a sand scow at the southern tip of Governors Island.

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1010, passing the northern tip of Sandy Hook but looking back at Naval Weapons Station Earle, with USNS Medgar Evers at the wharf.

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1017, Romer Shoal Light and Coney Island.

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1517, Capt. Willie Landers northbound off Beach Haven, I think.

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1612, FV Jonathan Ryan and tug Pops in the distance.

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1618, entering a grid marked “numerous scientific buoys.”

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1657 off Atlantic City, with unidentified tug and barge

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1740 and about to switch watch.

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Thursday, 0852, looking north into the Chesapeake after going wide around Fisherman Island.

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0910 . . . it’s the current  TS Kings Pointer, ex-Liberty Star. . .

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. . . heading along Virginia Beach

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before turning northward toward Long Island Sound.  Her former sister ship–Freedom Star–was in the area but we did not see her.

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Meanwhile, we head north into the Thimble Shoal Channel Tunnel and into port, which you can follow tomorrow.  And that tug and crane barge in the distance . . . survey work for new infrastructure or maintenance dredging?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to the USMMA Sailing Foundation for inviting me to crew in winter relocation for Tortuga.  It was a smooth trip.

Put Cornell into the search box and you’ll see how many posts I’ve done on this 1950 Long Island-built vessel.  I even wrote an article for Professional Mariner.  Click here for more info on Cornell.

But this post just raises a question . . .if the sunrises over a calm East River and no one is there to see it,

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is it still pretty?

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I think so.  Photos taken at 0630 this morning by Will Van Dorp.

Do you want to do the Great Loop, all 5000+ miles of it?  And you don’t have more than–say–a few days?  How about a few hours on a weekend when the weather’s inhospitable?  Now you can do it . . . and click on the photo below to see what it looks like to do the circumnavigation at warp speed . . .  from Sandy Hook to Liberty Landing in . ..  just over a minute.

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That video of one of over a hundred now available on Youtube.  Try this one . ..  Liberty Landing to Croton Point Half Moon Bay in just over two minutes in the rain.  The videos were produced by ActiveCaptain. The vessel, a DeFever 53RPH Trawler,  below is the ActiveCaptain’s version of the google camera car.  Read Bob Stopper’s article on the project here.  Bob also took all the photos in this post.

01A Capella squeaked under Leach Road Bridge in Lyons on  Erie Canal

02

04A Capella at dock  in Lyons NY (1024x768)

05Karen and Jeff on board a Capella at Lyons dock  (1024x768)-2

03A Capella entering Lock 27 (1024x768)

Many thanks to Bob for info about these videos and these photos.

 

What caught my attention was the towed side-by-side barge arrangement in the KVK,

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GL 65 and 66,

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with Stephanie Dann hanging off the stern.

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Once between Stapleton and Bay Ridge, the tow was re-made and

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and Sarah Dann took the two out the Narrows.

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Forty-eight hours later, they are still southbound, almost 350 nautical miles out of the sixth boro and off Cape Hatteras, and still southbound.

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So I have this question . . .  so since there are southbound train songs, why do I know  no southbound tow songs.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Not Afrodite although Apollon is otherwise a twin.

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This IS Afrodite.  All the rest of these fotos are compliments of Paul Strubeck.

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In this set of Paul’s fotos, you may conclude that his conveyance is overtaking Afrodite, but I’m reversing the order as the vessel  Afrodite–leaves the upper Hudson running towards sea and St. John.

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Click here for the rest of the TCM (I’m not sure why the T-E- N) fleet.

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This looks like Kathleen Turecamo and Frances assisting Afrodite out of the berth.

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I took the first foto, but all the others I am grateful to Paul Strubeck for.

I’ll ‘fess up . . . this is the picture in my head when I think of Afrodite.  And here is a former USN vessel by that same name!

 

The season comes to the east coast in late summer.  New York’s 2013 sixth boro race is 12 days away, but you can get tickets to watch it from a boat already by clicking here.  Be patient  . . . it may load slowly.

This is NOT a foto from NYC.  Can you guess where you’d see this original OSV design?  OSV here means “offshore (lobster) supplying vessel,”  which I confess are my first love in workboat design, dating from back when I lived in New Hampshire.  All fotos in this post come thanks to Birk Thomas, a force behind this site and its Facebook version, which generates a lot of pics  of workboats from all over.

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If you guessed Portland, Maine . . . this is the pre-race lineup for the MS Harborfest.

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I’m pretty sure this foto was taken from Andrew McAllister.

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And it’s push-off time.

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So in New York on September 1, whether you ride the boat or watch from the pier . . . I hope to see you there.

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Although the September 1 race in NYC is the 21st annual in the current series, the races date back to before I was born.  See fotos of the vessels from the 1952 race here.  Back then, an international lifeboat race–rowers came from whatever cargo ships were in port at that time–was part of the festivities.

Again, many thanks to Birk Thomas for these fotos.  And if you do Facebook, check out tugboatinformation there.

Click here for an account of gallivants in and around Ocracoke and Hatteras Inlets as well as my connection to these waters.  Beaufort Inlet–near Cape Lookout–is scheduled for some depth maintenance these days with Marinex Construction excavating what McFarland count not extract.  Katherine Weeks enters the inlet from sea with a light scow.

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The only USACE presence I saw was Snell.  USACE awarded Marinex the contract to subtract a half million tons of sand from beneath these waves.

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I believe this is cutterhead/pipleine dredge Savannah, connected by pipeline to this

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scow and loading equipment.

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When Katherine tows the loaded scow out–here past Sea Quest II, a dive boat (more on that later)

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Na Hoku-formerly a K-Sea vessel

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tails.  The Sea Knight helicopter

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just happened overhead.  I’d love the view from a helicopter here.

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Once through the narrow inlet, Katherine heads out for the dumping area and Na Hoku returns to its holding station.

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Who knew the inlet could be this busy . . . l to r:  Grace Moran, Aurora, Na Hoku, and Salamina1.  More on the last one on that list tomorrow.   Aurora, listed as a sulphur carrier, carries PotashCorp colors.

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Potash Corp has their big mine about 35 miles from here, as the pelicans fly.

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Chief is clearly a Marinex tug.

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I’m not sure the ID of the inbound vessel here passing Chief, here heading out to the dredge.

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I can’t say for certain about that dive boat early on and whether the divers had been on Queen Anne’s Revenge, but there’ve been lots of salvage activity around the Inlet in recent days.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

If I go cold-sixth-boro-turkey and don’t inhale the harbor air or take in the sights steaming in from all corners of the globe, I get jittery, feel constrained.

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There’s lots that fires up the imagination for me, but what really stokes my machinery is

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the names.  Following is a list of names I’ve seen on on East Coast US AIS the past few days  .  . . some in far-off places but what evocative names!!  I’m NOT talking yachts.  These are container ships, tankers, and bulk carriers.

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Red Lily, Angelic Power, Tango Sea, Atlantic Tramp, Silver Soul, Ivory Girl, Pink, Billion Trader, Romantic . . .    Wow!!  There’s nothing routine or lackluster or sinister about those.  Who in a company comes up with these?  I’d love to hear what “off the air” commentary gets expressed about these names.  What is the most memorable vessel name you’ve ever seen?

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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