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The parade lasted at my location from 1300 until 1530 . . . so many more photos–a few hundred–stay in the archives.  This last installment can be called vehicles and politics, although political caricature might be more accurate.

A few days before the parade, my friend Orlando Mendez caught these three vessels headed eastbound, just off the beach.  Yes, three.  Notice the front of the bow of a tug on the far side of the lead houseboat.  Anyone know who that was?

Maybe it was a mermaid trojan vessel . . . since a certain resemblance can be seen here . . .  I don’t know the name of this silvery submarine . . .

Behold the flying merlendas . . .

Andy Golub‘s creations,

a Farmall ratrod,

a Ford red belly,

Clamilton,

clever signs,

the repurposed composting true that

allows me to get a self-portrait  (Notice how few spectators surround me . . . .),

floats with

cheery self-takers,

and then the politicizers and caricaturists…

I wonder . . . this looks like the crowned figure made an appearance

TWICE!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Yesterday’s post was the lead-up.  The parade never starts until the man with the Coney drum steps out.

This year mermaid queen was Debbie Harry.

After that, it was lots of dancing and music. . . .  click here to listen to Fogo Azul’s Brazilian sound.

I love the beer can on the drum here, and

the edginess of playing an electric oud in the rain . . . Gypsyfunksquad . . . I made a video of them last year here.

The fog and showers seemed to animate the musicians and dancers, and

 

 

heighten the colors, like

this fierce contender, whom I

had gotten a close-up of earlier.

I’ll wager there were more people in the parade than watching it, generally a boon for photographers….

 

 

Crop rotation mermaids included soybeans, wheat, and  . . .

corn.

 

Colors and hoops and

. .  . crescents or arcs?

Colors abound but

this has to be the strangest dazzling costume ever . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Tomorrow . . . the odd bedfellows of mermaids, vehicles, and politics.

 

 

Here’s the most explicit explanation ever on this blog about Coney Island–part of Brooklyn–and the parade that’s happened there each summer solstice since   . . . time immemorial almost.  Today’s Daily News used adjectives like dreary, gloomy, and unruly to describe the day . . . .  Unruly? . . . we’ve been an unruly nation since even before the merfolk started coming ashore.  Dreary and gloomy . . . we’re talking about creatures who spend their lives in the watery parts of the world;  as they assembled, they seemed delighted to have only some water.  The NYPost actually got the story better this time.  These merfolk musicians played their hearts out in the rain. . .

These danced on sidewalks as they splashed their way to the gathering point . . .

hopping puddles with all their appendages and finery  . . .

But this year I first noticed the checkpoints merfolk had to negotiate  . . .

I don’t know if TSA served as consultant here.  I’ll call the gatekeepers MSA, and

they were pleasant .. .

 

as were merfolk.

From inside the gathering point, Ford’s Amphitheater, a human version of a hermit crab’s shell . . . some thrashed about,

others–although this may be a terrestrial wearing deepwater shoes– looked longfully out to the wet streets where they preferred to be,

some mimicked rain,

some imitated human material culture they’d seen around the sixth boro,

some rehearsed their music,

and others just showed the souvenirs they’d purchased during their annual shore leave.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More to come tomorrow and Tuesday.  Click here for previous mermaid posts on tugster.

I’d be interested in hearing from the Netherlands where the Coney Island event has spawned a Dutch version, called Zeemeerminnen parade . . .

 

Fly the Whale, that is.  And you can watch it all from the Barge Bar on the East River.

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Click here for a short video showing how to beat traffic . . .

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Of course, seaplanes or flying boats are nothing new to the sixth boro.  Click here for a short video of a Dornier Do-X arriving in a tugboat-filled harbor in 1929.  It has no sound, but if you want to hear the details, here’s another longer video.   Keyport NJ’s Aeromarine was operating long distance flights from the sixth boro even earlier.

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Watch them come and go

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as

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you

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watch from

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here.  For seaplane prices, click here.  But it costs nothing to watch, which is the right price for me.

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Click here for a previous post on Keyport.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who thinks that the photos in this post from February 2015 is an invigorating reminder of winter on a hot day.

Also, yesterday Marie Lorenz competed her journey in a rowboat from Buffalo to the sixth boro, and in true DeWitt Clinton fashion, she celebrated her accomplishment by pouring out some Lake Erie water into New York harbor.  See it and much more here.

In case you’re wondering if this blog has gone adrift . . . I’ll just plead solstice-ogling syndrome.  Why stay on course when a grape popsicle 1949 Mercury oozes by like this, and it’s tickling your tastebuds and it’s

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for sale, although I did not ask any particulars.

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Only at the mermaid parade could you get a photo like this, although the photographer here might

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be photographing the Chevy here with a right angle spy lens.  Or maybe she was putting me in the frame?

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Rattus rod!

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I’d let this guy park for free.

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Mesa sunrise on this mid-1950s Lincoln?

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And finally, seeing this old Ford made me remember this unit from

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way south Coney Island Caribbean.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has now recalled that although Coney Island is surrounded (mostly) by the sixth boro, it is still part of Brooklyn.

 

I’m not going to count, but there must be dozens of posts here with photos from or some mention of Paul Strubeck.  Here I’m pleased to dedicate a whole post to him in part because these photos make me see the sixth boro with new eyes.  Enjoy.  Cornell . . . by foggy night and compare to my photo from about the same day but at dawn here and scroll to the third photo.  The location is the soon-to-open Brooklyn Barge Bar, where I’m eager to imbibe a sunset beer. Also in Paul’s “roll” of film are

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Pinuccia and Specialist mostly obscured,

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Captain D ,

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Nanticoke passing the East River Seaplane base,

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an unobscured photo of Specialist,

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Sea Robin secured to Sugar Express at the sugar plant in Yonkers,

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James William,

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and Foxy 3 pushing a Thornton barge, which

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brings us back to a great photo of Cornell, which Paul used his special lens for.

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All photos here are used with permission from Paul Strubeck.  Thanks much, Paul.

Unrelated:  Here’s an East River seaplane photo I posted here many years ago. And a photo of Sugar Express towed south by a former fleet mate of Sea Robin.

Deer do it.  So do . . . whales, dragonflies, eels, and more .  But the annual mermaid migration, I find,  is as magical to me as it is to the young girl watching for the first time, taking photos, and one of the princesses of the sea came over and blew some sparkles all around.

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When the mermaids migrate in, they bring entourages of music,

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like samba, and

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loud marching bands and

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shrillest of pipes.

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I noticed that the troubled vessel Grey Shark left town during the parade;  I turned and looked out at the drizzly sea behind me, but preferred to take a closeup of the dogfish that stuck around.

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The mermaids feted some old-timers like daddy-oh!

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They brought in some commercial land folk with adaptations.

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They even engaged in some unexpected commerce.

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They commandeered a “fruits of the sea” sacrifice bearer.

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Of course, there were some humans who felt they needed to “administer” the  event, BUT

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otherwise, the sea creatures just emerged, checked their makeup, and

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and exuded their legendary grace

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and cheeriness.

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much to the delight of all the photographers or just admirers.

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They stayed the day, rainy as it was, before taking flight until the next time.

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I’ve missed only twice in the past decade:  here are posts from 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010  . . . and you can find more just by scrolling way down to the archives  . . . lower left and searching June each year around the 21st.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

About lobster migrations, click here.

And about animals in parades, the NYTimes this morning had this great story on a swimming/patrolling beast from its Brazilian bureau chief  . . .

 

 

 

Here were some of the previous Mary Whalen moves.  And here was one return.  A few days ago, Mary Whalen moved into Atlantic Basin, where the 70th birthday party was held and public access will be much easier than it has been for future programming TBA.   This post shows pics taken onboard during the move;  I hope to present more soon.  The day started early at the pier which has been home for a long time.

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Prime mover this time was Quantico Creek, tailed by Christian . . . way in the distance.

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NYMediaBoat and Christian were part of the escort, as

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as was Shipshooter with his latest equipment to follow and film

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“We have lift off.”

the pirouette in the Buttermilk Channel and a

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0914

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NYMedia Boat captures the action from starboard side of Quantico Creek

hook into Atlantic Basin, where in September 2009, Portside helped host a huge Dutch barge party.

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Once she’s all fast, may the programming begin.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Read the press release here from PortSide NewYork.

For some great Red Hook history and historical images, click here.

 

Click on the photo below for credits and context.  I’ve never seen VLCC Bay Ridge, but I’d love to see her now as she approaches her 36th year afloat.    This will be her last year, as she is currently being scrapped in Aliaga, Turkey, after nearly two decades serving as a FPSO unit off the coast of Angola.  Click here for a photo of the Brooklyn built vessel today as well as some controversy involved in the scrapping, as you can read here.

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To see this product of skilled Brooklyn labor under tow from Angola to Turkey, click here and scroll not quite halfway through. Finally click here for many more photos of Kuito, ex-Bay Ridge.

Below are two marginally related photos of an FPSO under tow into Rio harbor in July 2013.

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For more of my Rio photos, click here or type JR into the search window.   Both color photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the post I put up the day 343 arrived in the sixth boro, brand spanking new.  And below was a photo I took a few cold days ago when it seemed to be on routine patrol.

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Tony Acabono snapped the next two photos just before 0011 Saturday, and

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Ashley Hutto got this one just after lunch.  Note the NYMediaboat is on the scene.

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Here were some photos I got a few years ago of a land’s edge fire in a place where today there is no land.  Pier 17 is gone, for now.

Paperwork fueled the fire, it seems.

Thanks much to Tony and Ashley for these photos.  I took the first photo, where you can see the now-renovated Pier A.  To see some of the previous usages of this area, click here.   Right near there is also the dramatic Merchant Mariners Memorial by Marisol Escobar.

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