You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Africa’ category.

Old Wine has to be one of the best vessel names ever!  Disclaimer . . . she does NOT carry beverage.  I’d love to see her come to the sixth boro, although  . . . I can imagine the temptation some would feel to alter the name-great as it is–by adding some letters.  Some ideas follow.  Seriously, I use this foto with permission of Antonio, a Spanish tug captain who visited the sixth boro for the tugboat race back in 2009 . . . scroll through to the end here.

0aaaars

Fairplayer . . . another great name from Colin in Cape Town.  I caught a Jumbo in the KVK about three years ago here.

0aaaars1

Faust arriving in town might make one worry, although I saw no evidence of that.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Spruce 2 . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

To play with Old Wine . . . well . . . add an R to the end.  Or add a S in front of the second word.  I’m sure you could do better.

Thanks to Antonio Alcaraz Arbelo for the first foto, Colin Syndercombe for the second.  The last two by Will Van Dorp.

Above the waterline, this looks amazingly like Peking.    Identify it?

0aaaaaaaasd

These fotos come from Colin Syndercombe, who previously sent these fotos, and these, among others.   As to the sailing vessel, it’s from 1921, 385′ loa (Peking is 1911 and 377′), and still sails.    Know it?  It called in Cape Town earlier this month, and is now northbound.

0aaaasd2

It’s Sedov, sailing ’round the world at 90+ years old.  Click here to see ports of call.   Does anyone know if she’s ever called in a US port?

0aaaasd3

0aaaasd4

0aaaasd5

0aaaasd5b

0aaaasd6

0aaaasd7

For more fotos of Sedov, click here.  Prior to this month, the last time this vessel–then Magdalene Vinnen II–called in Cape Town was in the 1930s.

Thanks much to Colin for these fotos.

The Atlantic is a huge place, and this vessel is currently northbound in that expanse.  And where would that put them?

0aaaasorlandet2

0aaaasorlandet3

Off Namibia.

0aaaasorlandeta1

here leaving Cape Town last weekend.  Click here for the map, and here for the kapteines-logg, complete with pics.   See the huge blue wall along the portside of Sørlandet?

0aaaasorlandeta2

It turns out that this 85-year-old ship stopped in the sixth boro in 1981 and 1986.  Click here for a video of the vessel headed for Chicago in 1933!

0aasorlandet

The “blue wall” is Colossos . . . although I’ve no idea what it’s doing down in Cape Town.

0aaaasorlandet5

All fotos thanks to Colin Syndercombe.

Does anyone have fotos of Sørlandet in the sixth boro in the 1980s?

Note:  The barge in the link has been reported as RTC-105, but I’ve gotten some notes saying it is not.    Sorry I can’t positively say either way.

This isn’t going to end well, but you may remember this post from a bit over a year ago.  Mighty Servant 1 came to town and left with some equipment . . . including this barge,

0aaaar1

RTC 105, 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

which went in the center of Mighty Servant.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Other barges were loaded, one on each side, as well as three tugs, and they sailed out the Narrows and over the horizon.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Click here to see its demise captured on video recently.  What the audio says is unconfirmed.

Fotos from December 19, 2011 by Will Van Dorp.

Here was 11.

First, this foto from Colin Syndercombe in Cape Town, and I believe the foto comes from The Latest Maritime News.  It appears MV Chamarel, which burned earlier in August off Namibia, will become yet another wreck in the sands of the Skeleton Coast.

To Michele McMorrow, thanks for her foto of Walrus, snapped near Bahr’s Landing in Highlands, NJ.  At first I thought it was being delivered for use by tugster . . .  I was mistaken.

RORO Cape Washington is the latest MSC vessel in for maintenance at the dry dock in Bayonne.

Currently in the sixth boro, it’s almost-new NCC Shams, not an inspiring name unless you consider that “shams” is Arabic for “sunshine.”

My foto snapped in Port Huron, it’s Lakes Pilots Association’s Huron Maid.

Also along the Port Huron waterfront, it’s Grayfox, a Sea Cadet vessel.

And finally  . . . since this post started with a walrus and since tugster does NOT appear in person frequently on this blog, here’s a foto of tugster and Badger on the waterfront in Manitowoc.  And apropos of nothing . . .  what’s the connection between dachshund and badger?

First enjoy the foto below and read this announcement from Old Salt’s blog here.

Answer:  “dach” is German for “badger,” so the word “dachshund” means “badger dog.”  Now you know !!

Unless otherwise attributed, all fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Pier 25 is unmistakeable on the Hudson side of lower Manhattan.  I posted fotos of Lilac moving to Pier 25 aka “historic ships pier” back a year and some months ago.   On some of those fotos, you can see bowsprite catching lines from the Miller’s Launch crew assisting Lilac’s arrival.  Bowsprite also goes by the name “Christina Sun,” who is half of the art show proclaimed on the dockside sign below.

Here she was hanging the show last weekend.  If you’ve looked at her site much, you’d have seen her rendering of RB 45614 (below) on her artblog here.

The other half of the art show (up til the end of August!!) is Frank Hanavan.    I’ve painted with Frank, like here on this bowsprit at least six years ago, and posted on this blog here back in 2007.  This foto and the next by Maggie Flanagan.

But besides painting in places that require a harness, Frank also paints

en plein air with an easel. In fact, this piece, part of his show, he did ON Pier 25 back in May when Picton Castle docked there for a few days.  Click on that link  (scroll through) and you’ll

see what message was printed on the square sail on the foremast.  Frank’s art is all contained in one room on Lilac, but

bowsprite’s 38 prints are spread through Lilac, leading the observer on a treasure hunt . . .  even through the engine room!

But I can’t look at a piece like this and NOT remember the delightful story on her blog about excavator dredge J. P. Boisseau with remembering the whale that appeared in Lower NY Bay, no doubt coming to check who was scratching the harbor’s bottom . . . and why.

Lilac is a unique vessel open to the public Mondays, Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays.  Hours are here.  In fact, this Saturday evening, besides art, you can also see the world premiere of a documentary about MV Liemba, the nearly century old steam ferry (I believe very recently dieselized but still running) on Lake Tangayika.  For a press release about the film from Lilac Museum director, Mary Habstritt, click here.

Historic ships, art, film, music, drinks, warm summer evening on the Hudson in Lower Manhattan . .  . . . .  see you there!!  Bring some $$ too and take home some beautiful marine art for your walls.

Here’s Frank’s official site.   And here’s Christina’s online “sketchbook.”

Unrelated:  Here’s a 13-minute interview I did with John Doswell of Working Harbor Committee (WHC) back in 2010.  I’d never heard it until today.  And remember  . . . here’s info on the WHC-sponsored 20th annual tugboat race coming up in NYC’s sixth boro in less than three weeks!!

. . . or I could say 12480 kms away.    Here was the previous one in this series.  Remember the port?

Well, in this port recently was this tug named Merlot and the green vessel . . . a large canoe?  And yes, check here for tugs named chardonnay, shiraz,  and pinotage.  Nothing here yet named Ripple or Boone’s Farm . . .  Here’s what Colin wrote about the green vessel:

“That ship ULSTEIN CLEAR is fresh as a daisy, built at ZHEJIANG SHIPBUILDING in China and  delivered 31  MAY 2012.   They also build them in BRAZIL where PETROBRAS ordered six and two have been built there and four will be complete during 2013.  I have read that PETROBRAS have ordered quite a few drilling rigs for their offshore operations.   On one of the ULSTEIN ships they have a crane mounted for wind farm operations.  It lifts 5000 tons so very effectively.  It will be used between England and Ireland.”

Some might consider this design so unusual as to be ugly, but I see this as an extrapolation from a canoe bow . .  or the prow of a Viking ship.

More info about this hull and its advantages for working in heavy sea–reduced motion and fuel efficiency– can be found here.   Great videos and animations.  Note the location of the exhausts.  If you didn’t identify them, they

are the diagonals more visible here.

I don’t believe a vessel with this sort of bow has visited the sixth boro . . .

yet.

All fotos by colin Syndercombe, to whom I am grateful.

Of course, every day is water day in the sixth boro of the city of NY, and it’s great that MWA and other sponsors have chosen for five years now to recognize that fact . . . on a big “get out on the water” day . . . because who OWNS the port . . . ultimately WE do, you and I, as citizens of this country.  Many organizations manage it, enforce regulations in it, and fund educational activities about it . . . but WE own it, the port, the water . . .  and support it with our taxes and our votes.

Enjoy this set of twelve fotos taken over roughly a 12-hour period yesterday.   At daybreak, Pegasus and Urger were still rafted up on Pier 25.  This foto shows two boats whose combined longevity adds up to over 215 years!!

Resolute was northbound over by the Murchison-designed Hoboken terminal . . . which means a larger vessel needing assistance MAY shortly be headed for sea.  Here’s another Murchison-designed mass transit building in what today seems an unlikely location.

North River itself works tirelessly as part of the effort to keep sixth boro waters clean.

Urger poses in front the the Statue.  Lady Liberty was a mere 18-year-old when Urger (then C. J. Doornbos) first splashed into the waters of a Lake Michigan bay.

Launch 5 races downriver.

Indy 7 shuttles folk around as Soummam 937,  the first Algerian warship ever to visit the sixth boro leaves for sea.

Little Lady II and a sailboat negotiate passage.

Laura K and Margaret Moran escort in container vessel Arsos (check its recent itinerary at the bottom of that linked page) and weave their way to the Red Hook container port through a gauntlet of smaller vessels, including Manhattan.

Catherine C. Miller moves a small equipment barge back to base.

Fire Fighter II hurries north on the Buttermilk Channel to respond to an alarm.

A flotilla (or bobbering or paddling or badelynge) of kayaks crosses the Buttermilk.

Pioneer tacks toward the north tip of Governors Island, leaving Castle William to starboard.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp on Bastille-sur-l’eau Day.

Related:  I was overjoyed to read the NYTimes this morning and find this article about a vessel calling at Port Newark!!  Bravo.  Back a little over a week ago I was miffed about this article . . . about the port in Trondheim, which could just as well have been written about skilled workers anywhere in the sixth boro.

Also, I’m passing along a request from the Urger crew:  if anyone sees a foto of Urger crew in any local print publications, please tell me so that I can look for a clipping to pass along to them.  Thanks much . . . .

Unrelated:  From today’s NYTimes Book Review section, an essay by Douglas Brinkley and Johnny Depp on Woodie Guthrie, who would have turned 100 yesterday.

By the way, from Mitch’s Newtown Pentacle, can anyone identify the tug in this post?  I can’t .

Narrative by Pamela Syndercombe, sent to me as email, abridged by me.  It’s winter in South Africa.

“I set off in my bakkie  (small pickup) to watch the progress up the Rooi Hooghter Pass, which one climbs to enter Villiersdorp.   The vintage tractors trundled slowly along to gather just outside the village to escort Alwyn Vintcent (AV).  They appeared out  of the cold early morning mist like pictures from the past.

By 9 o’clock the sun was starting to  burn through  but it was still cold. Then the ALE truck with the pole for height measuring came past.  Police sirens screamed and blue lights flashed  before the procession appeared around the first bend.  The more intrepid of the vintage cars were there too…shining and more highly polished than the day they came out of the box!  The sun shone as it only can on a winter’s day in the Cape amongst the mountains.   AV soon appeared, one truck in front and one pushing from behind…and of course braking on the down hills. The tug looked simply enormous at this point.  She passed me at the really quite sharp corner where the view was splendid  across the deep donga (cutaway caused by erosion).  I wiped my eyes blew my nose and joined the queue of vehicles  back on the road to Villiersdorp.

All along the road there were little groups of farm workers, their wives and children  waving  and cheering. Pruning work on the orchards and vineyards came to a stop.  The big Dutch Reform Church was ringing its bells and my tears came again.  Andy (Andy Selfe, who wrote the narrative in the link that follows.) balanced precariously on a water tower outside the village gave me a wave and later confessed that he  had been crying so hard he could hardly see to use his camera.  Slowly slowly though the village, the main road lined with watchers….smiles from ear to ear everywhere.   Even those who came  to grumble still came to watch. All the tractors and vintage cars were leading the old lady.  Then home for me  to blow my nose again and reflect on the persistence of a few men….which gave me more understanding of and admiration for the character of the farmers in this area.”

Here are fotos and Andy’s account, with great details like abnormal load exits, hugging speed cops, campfire under the tug at night, getting barked at by baboons, and self-described “bunch of crazy farmers” … with references to laager (circle-the-wagons camp), lay-by (rest area) , and hooters (horns). . .  .  Here’s a glossary.    Click here for the AV main site with lots of links and video.

Congratulations to Andy and the Tractor club and all the crews.  Thanks to Pamela for sharing her reaction.     Here and here are previous posts I’ve done on AV.   Here was “Relief Crew #14.”

Alwyn Vintcent has moved over the mountains from Cape Town.  Credit here goes to Villiersdorp blog, where you can find many many more fotos.  Credit also goes to some amazing farmers with a dream and then grit to make it real.  I’m just putting up three fotos of the arrival, because they move me.

Here’s a post I did six weeks ago about Alwyn Vintcent.

Again, thanks to Villiersdorp Events for these fotos.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,469 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

June 2021
M T W T F S S
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930