Party boats like Ocean Eagle V and 

Gypsea II seemed to have lots of fisherman aboard of late. 

Boats like Twisted Sisters

 

 

and Taylor Nicole have also been running traps . . .

 

all tribute to a healthy water system, it seems.

All photos in the past month, WVD. 

These road fotos posts are celebrations by restless people like me of mobility and the means to travel, see new things.  I guess these are some guard rails on my southbound journey.

Northbound view, this highway has a guard rail to keep anyone from tumbling into the Pacific, whereas on the right side, that bank looks solid until the road disappears into the ocean with a landslide.

Staten Island has some guard rails to keep you from being distracted (ha!!)  by the sixth boro.

substantial guard rails now and speed cameras make it increasingly inhospitable.

The Mississippi–as seen from a westbound jet– has extra sand cushions around the turns, perfect locations for camping maybe if you follow the river road like Dale Sanders.  If you click on any links today, this one here on Sanders’ amazing feat is the one.   Eddie L. Harris did it too, although at a much younger age.

Here the critters in the bushes keep you focused on driving safely, and the potholes moderate your speed, one way or another, as you travel westbound.

Seen northbound just north of Washington DC . . .  and no comment.

This is the tow path/bike path up near Newark NY, and what you’ll see if you make a long bicycle trip eastbound in 2023.

Another eastbound photo . . . aka the Noses, place of legend.  If you click on another link today, be it this one. The photo below is from a road trip in October, but I’ve posted photos of this location from the Mohawk River in previous posts here. To the left is NYS Canal and then the transport rails you’d ride on Amtrak or a container train.

Heading north in November before turning back . . . all I can say is that the road, guard rails, ditches, Lake Ontario–like the truth–are out there . . . somewhere. 

And one more from November . . . southbound on the Taconic, this sign always intrigued me, conjured up lurid thoughts.  Unfortunately, I looked up its origin, and now I wish I hadn’t.  If you prefer to keep your lurid associations, do not look this up. Ignorance, if not always bliss, is sometimes more entertaining.

All photos, any weirdness, WVD, who wishes that all your travels are safe. 

If you want to help out with the next “road fotos” post, email me your strangest “seen along the road/channel/river/flyway/etc” photo you’ve taken this year . . .

Got that name, not the one midships but the one on the bow?  Torm was co-founder of the company in 1889!

“Republican” . .  it’s just a name for a Torm Medium Range IMO Type 2/3 tanker, Danish International Shipping register, one of at least two dozen Torm tankers that have appeared on this blog.  This ship’s name has nothing to do with blue or red, US or Spain or Ireland . . . this list goes on and on

Two Moran tugboats traveled south in the Upper Bay and 

assisted it into a berth at the east end of IMTT.

 

The low angle light made pronounced areas of light and shadow. 

In the photo below, extreme right, note the two crew on the starboard bridge wing, no doubt

 

calling out directions for Kirby and 

JRT to ease the tanker into the dock. 

 

All photos, WVD.

This monthly practice of looking back a decade gives me an opportunity to dust off a specific part of the archive in tugster tower.  Besides sneezing sometimes because of the dust, I also feel amazed about the amount of change, small changes maybe but significant it seems. 

Evening Mist has become Everly Mist, and is in a new endeavor.  Palva is now Laurentia DesGagnes operating on and out of the Saint Lawrence River where I saw her a few years back.  Only Eastern Welder in the background remains.

I made a few trips out to Greenport a decade ago, and walking through a shipyard saw this vessel from Suffolk Count Department of Health and its unusual top deck exhaust.  Is that still around?  I’m guessing it might check water quality on shellfishing areas . . .

Bebedouro (1974) and Atlantic Conveyor (1985), now both dead and scrapped.  Brendan Turecamo still works here all day every day.

Rebel (138′ x 46′) is still on the NJ side of the sixth boro, waiting for an opportunity to get back to work.

Viking (132′ x 34′) has been cut up.

Annabelle Dorothy Moran was on her delivery run, making her way to the Chesapeake/Delaware Bay area, where she still works. Those range markers are no longer in place on the Brooklyn Heights bank of the sixth boro.

John B Caddell was nearing the end of this shore leave, heading for her final one.  Note Sarah Ann tending the crane barge and WTC in the distance not yet completed. 

Commander, a WW1 USN vet as SP-1247, was still showing its rotondity.

Joan Turecamo, a late Matton product, was still in the boro.  Now she winds her way around the curves of the Lower Mississippi. 

Sarah Ann and others of the Donjon fleet kept me up most of the night in December 2012, as she stood by a barge carrying WTC antenna sections that  were lifted onto Manhattan . . .

across a blocked west side highway . . . lowered onto a vehicle with dozens of axles . . .

and trucked inland

In other night photos, quite rare on this blog . . .  it’s Clearwater lifted onto Black Diamond barge with Cornell standing by.

I hope you enjoyed this backward glance as much as I have.  I might have to get out and do some documenting of nighttime events on the sixth boro this December. 

All photos, December 2012, WVD. 

If you’re still wanting a tugster calendar 2023 version, click here for info. You can even order a few or a dozen . . .

Twas the day before Thanksgiving, and the Port ‘Liz had ships aplenty, 

but the very next day it was almost empty.  

In a different part of the US, TS Empire State, which just two months ago was alive and lurking beneath Throgs Neck bridge, has delivered itself to the breakers in Brownsville. 

Heading back to the sixth boro . . . go to the infrequently–it seems–updated google map satellite view for the east side of Staten Island, and you ‘ll see this impressive flotilla . . .

ten tugboats and eleven tank barges.  I know some of you might be able to identify some or all of these 21 vessels, now scattered to the seven seas.

While I’m posting about online visuals, I enjoyed Sal’s discussion here yesterday on the current state of piracy around the world but particularly off West Africa.  This reminded me of how long ago already the Maersk Alabama aka Captain Phillips incident happened;  before clicking on the link, guess which year that vessel was held.  USS Bainbridge, which visited the sixth boro in 2016, was involved in retaking the ship.  Here’s a helpful site Sal mentioned that tracks incidents of piracy around the seven seas.

And one more . . .  can you imagine spending 11 days and nights on an open boat at sea?  How about that period of time riding the top of a tanker’s rudder!!?  Read about it here

 

Sometimes dragons seem to gather in the sixth boro.  Last weekend seemed to have an esoteric South American theme, which I took the liberty of intensifying by adding to this post some vessels from before last weekend.

Bulk Colombia is still in port over at Atlantic salt discharging white stuff . . . salt of course from northern deserts of Chile to keep local roads savory. 

Lila Amazon departed the Upper Bay this morning, but is possibly only gone as far as the anchorage off Long Beach NY. 

The huge CMA CGM Brazil has become a regular, at least as regular as can be on her globe trotting ( navigating) voyages.  She’s currently between Sri Lanka and Malayasia. 

Ditto CMA CGM Argentina, currently over along the western coast of Mexico. 

Polar Colombia . . . I’d say that name qualifies as an oxymoron, whereas

Polar Chile makes a bit more sense, since southern Chile.  That reminds me of Richard Hudson’s  Issuma circumnavigation of the Americas and more;  he left the sixth boro, made his way south by going north:  up the Hudson and across the Erie Canal, into the Saint Lawrence, west of Greenland, across to Northwest Passage and the Bering Strait to the Pacific, around Chile’s Cape Horn, over to Cape Town . . . . and ultimately back to the sixth boro.  Now he’s on another lap, with the boat in Newfoundland.   Lots more of Richard on his YouTube channel

All photos, any errors, WVD, who might be thinking about South America right now because the area is about to cross into summer.

I could not make out what this barge was, although I knew the tug was one I first knew as Petrel, and first posted on this blog in 2008 and reprised here. Back then she had Sugar Express in tow. 

Here was one answer;  Northstar Integrity was moving Hughes 181 barge, chock full of equipment. 

I’m not sure what project they’d all been working on or what this equipment was for. 

 

After dropping off the barge on the west side of the Bayonne Bridge, she returned light. 

Here’s a close up of the 1977 75′ x 25′ 1800 hp tugboat. 

 

All photos, any errors, WVD, who’s offering these 2023 calendars that can be in your mailbox by week’s end. Today only, if I read the site correctly, use code CM22 at checkout for a 60% discount. If you try that, let me know if it works.

I’ll get to the blue moon reference in a moment, but first . . .

Need one or more calendars for 2023?  I’ve approached the project differently this year:  the calendars are ready, you can preview, you can order here, and they’ll come directly to you.  That’s good for me because it frees me from tedious packaging and mailing, leaving time to be out taking photos.  Watching sixth boro traffic, traveling among traffic, taking photos of traffic, and researching traffic . . . are all preferable to me, as you know.  Case in point . . . blue moon, which is actually a sea story with the usual losses and gains, some photos I took yesterday.

Don’t the lines look somewhat Chesapeake…ish, a bit of bugeye in her lines?

Yesterday morning she crossed the Upper Bay, heading south late in November all under sail.  

Blue moon and today’s post photos have a tighter connection than blue moon and my 2023 marine calendar.  Here’s the connection:  the “three-sail bateau” aka ketch here is called Blue Moon.  The 69′ aluminum-hulled sailboat was built in the late 1980s as a cargo schooner, transporting tropical hardwoods.  Later she was owned by a co-founder of Crocs shoes. Now she’s a Nantucket-based excursion vessel whose owner makes an interesting sea story himself with a maritime Covid love story thrown into the mix.  Teased enough?  Find the details here.    There are even references to King’s Point USMMA, color blindness, and lobstering in the story.

She was not on AIS yesterday morning, so I needed to do a bit of research to identify her, and researching is another time-consuming task I enjoy.  In a past life I may have been an intelligence analyst.  Puzzling things out certainly beats waiting on line at my local USPS.

Here’s more on the boat.  It was designed by Thomas E. Colvin, designer of Rosemary Ruth and Le Papillon and built by Reuel Parker

All photos yesterday, WVD.  Fair winds, Blue Moon.  

Repeating myself here:  my 2023 calendars are available here.  At that link, you can preview all the pages;  no sailing vessels are included despite Blue Moon‘s, going south, appearance in this post.  The calendars could be going out into the USPS system tomorrow. 

If you want something customized, I can do that too.   

 

This series goes back to the last days of December 2010, the first post here.  I could break the 2022 installment into three posts, each covering a third of this waning year. 

Things creep, including the definition of “road,” since a channel is not unlike a road.  In this photo from January 3, 2022, Ava and Bruce here guide Ever Far safely into her berth.  

This sign along the road in Orient does double duty;  to eastbound traffic it’s the last, but on the other side it equally accurately informs westbounders–just off the ferry–that it’s the first farm along this road.

This is a footpath under the Jackie Robinson Parkway.

This was a view from a rutted parking lot off a dirt road in the Appalachians in February.

These buffalo find a home in the 315 area code region of NYS.

Great Beds Light, as any lighthouse, guides vessels in channels between NY and NJ.

Here’s a welcoming sign along the east side of the Chesapeake, 

and this marks a lake that’s been drained several times and always comes back with a vengeance. 

That’s sand near Rodanthe, 

and a variety of farms near where I first lived.   Actually, the location of my first home is on the horizon center of the photo. 

Not far from the KVK, I transited this bamboo stand. and 

a few miles west of the Hudson, this trail required attention. 

Sidewalks and trails in Central Park get you here, and 

these ferries were idled near the southern tip of Hatteras.

All photos along various roads and taken in first months of 2022, WVD. 

 

I spent part of a quiet T’day thinking about doing a 2023 calendar, and difficult as it always is to winnow the choices down to 12 or so shots, I’m doing a calendar.  Price will likely be $20 again.    Sorry to bring up buying on this Black Friday.

Going back through the 2022 photos reminded me of the highs and lows of my personal year.  I also looked again at some gallivant photos I’ve never posted on the blog.  Today seems a good although dark, rainy day to open the line locker. 

Any guesses on this roadside attraction?  It’s a 3/8 size replica measuring 63′ x 13.’  I’ll let you do the math.  Answers below.   Doesn’t the design suggest a Zumwalt class destroyer?

I took the photo in April 2022. 

 

Here’s another roadside attraction.  Maybe I could do some road photos 2022 posts.  Any ideas about this similar replica vessel, this one appropriately on terra firma, or terra mudda?

There’s a clue in this photo. 

So before moving to the next sets, here’s some ID:  both are replica from the Confederate Navy and both are located in North Carolina, whose flag you see above.  The first is CSS Albemarle, moored in the Roanoke River in Plymouth NC.   The actual vessel–158′ x 35′ — was commissioned in April 1864, and sunk in October of the same year.  More here.

The second vessel is CSS Neuse II, a replica of a 152′ x 34′ steam-powered ironclad ram.  Also launched in April 1864, the underpowered and “overdrafted” warship bogged down and never left the immediate area of Kinston NC, where she was built.  Finally, in March 1865, her crew burnt the vessel in the river to prevent its capture by Union land forces.  More here

Previous US Civil War vessels I’ve mentioned on this blog are USS Cairo and CSS Hunley.   Any suggestions for other Civil War navies sites to visit?

The fine print on the vessel below says University of Maryland; it’s their RV Rachel Carson down in Solomons MD. 

I took the Carson photo from the decks of skipjack Dee of St Mary’s, a delightful cruise under sail as part of a friend’s even-more-delightful wedding. 

I’m not allowed to say much about the next set, but I have the privilege to see this tricky maneuvering up close.  

Note that this vessel, currently underway between Indonesia and South Korea, is assisted by four tugboats. 

Thanks so much for the hospitality.  You know who you are.  Again, sorry I’m not permitted to say much more or publish my article.  If you have any questions or comments about this last set, email or telephone me.

All photos, any errors, WVD, who’s thinking of doing a freighter cruise soon, with a destination in eastern or southeastern Asia.  does anyone have suggestions?  I’ve not yet contacted these folks.  

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