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Steamboat 2

Kudos to Jim: the port traversed by Berge Everett is … Boston. Read Jim’s comment on the left sidebar. In response to the first post about Lilac, says Dan . . . “A real steam engine is to a diesel as a pipe organ to an electric organ.” Hmm? Dan might have music technology biases. […]

Steamboat

I’ll never forget the first time I heard it, an almost imperceptible throbbing in the Congolese night like a slow heartbeat, a drum of some great diameter. At breakfast I learned the sounds meant a steamboat navigating up the Lulonga, tributary of the Congo. A week later when I heard it again, I got up […]

Steamer Lilac Sighted

It’s been a while since Lilac appeared here, but this illusion of the steamer under way on her own power was thrilling.  I’m not adept enough at photo manipulation to add the right measure of smoke from her stack.   And yes, the prime mover here is Michael Miller, with Susan nearby as well.  . Like […]

Retro Sixth Boro 26 a

May 2010 . . . I took my first trip to see the thrills of the southern Arthur Kill, thanks to Bonnie.  Back then the hull of Astoria (1925-1967 on the East River Line) was still there. Since then, I believe it’s been removed  . . . said to be an eyesore.  !@#$?!!  Here’s more […]

Virtual Erie Canal 1W: Lake Erie to Lockport

Preface: The title 1W indicates this is a west-to-east trip, almost 200 miles between Lake Erie and the cut into Onondaga Lake, not far from Three Rivers, where previously we left the Erie and headed north on the Oswego.  Many smaller recreational boats traveling between the Lakes and the Atlantic follow this west-to-east via Lockport […]

Local Exotics

I realize the oxymoronic twist of this title . . . local v. exotic . . . but these are boats that are seldom seen.  When this stack and upper superstructure first cameinto view, i suspected it might be one of those ghost AIS signals like Hunter D or No. 11 Asomaru I’ve been noticing […]

Thanks to Kevin Oldenburg

. . . or I could call this another unusual tow or unusual cargo, but Kevin took these photos, as he did some of those here. Megan Beyel has towed cargo down the Hudson before, as these two posts, but she’s hardly a regular.  I’ll bet that unit weighs upwards of 150 tons. The other […]

Carnavalons 2

The premier event of Carnaval de Québec has become ice canoeing, a unique sport stemming from early French settlement along the St. Lawrence:  in summer boats connected the opposite sides of the river, and in winter sleds traversed, but during the times between, canoes alone could provide this contact.  The need for treacherous crossings ended after the introduction […]

Relief Crew 20: Sir Walter Scott

Walter Scott‘s 1810 publication of The Lady of the Lake, an epic poem which sold 25,000 copies in eight months, triggered Scottish tourism, by rail and boat. Tourism demand boomed:   the early six or eight oared galleys were replaced by the small 70′ steamboat Rob Roy (1845), then a 90′ steamyacht Rob Roy and lastly […]

Helen L. Tracy

A month or so ago, I talked with Don Lake, who wanted to tell me some family history, which I transcribe here:  “My family has been on tugs for many years, beginning with my grandfather, Captain James Lake, who began his career as a young boy on Rondout Creek, NY, in the late 1800s and […]