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Fruits of Preservation 3

Here were the first two installments of this series.  And what prompts this post is the news yesterday about a $200 million structure in the assembly stages just four years ago.  Click on the image below to see the post I did just four years ago. It will be scrapped as announced yesterday here.  The […]

Fruits of Preservation 2

Here was the first in this series.  Guess the date these photos were taken? Consider all that coal smoke. As it turns out Dockyard III doesn’t always blow so much smoke. Click on this link if you wish, but what I find remarkable there is that Dockyard III and its sisters were built in WW2 for […]

Fruits of Preservation

Once these were wooden barges, which were towed around the harbor with a wide range of cargoes.  In the foreground … disintegrating … is one a tug that once could have done the towing, now unidentifiable and impotent. The sixth boro has many such tugs and barges, although given the efficient advance of decrepitude, fewer […]

1914–1941 Floating Theater

I’m thrilled to discover entirely new stories, like this one, which I found after following up some info I’d seen on a historical marker sign in Bath, NC, a month ago.  Click here and scroll to see the historical marker.  I saw it briefly in the headlights but took no photos. When I googled “floating theater bath […]

De Boomed

Here’s the index for previous Twin Tube posts.  This freight vessel is 64′ x 19′ x 8.5, and I’m sure I’ve mentioned before that it is one of the first Blount built vessels ever, launched in 1951.  Here’s the index to all my previous  Blount posts. This is how I imagine her, but recently . . […]

Coffee Barges Extraordinaire

See it there, the modest red covered barge between Wavertree and Peking?  The steel covered barge is called Progress today.   Once it transported coffee from ship to shore.   I’m making a note to myself:  learn more about these. And right across the East River to the right of the firehouse at Fulton Landing, […]