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Even if you’re not a regular reader of this blog or you lack a photographic memory, you just know from the photo below that Legs III has completed its journey.  Bravo Seth and crew. 

So let’s go back to the land of liftboats and have another look, since I’ve got “binders full of” boat photos I’ve not yet posted . . .

like L/B Lafayette above and Grand Isle below, boats likely now back at work.

So let’s hit the ditches . . .

 

Keep in mind that if I were to do this trip again–and I’d LOVE to–I might see all different boats, not Capt Doug Wright of Memphis, 

Clair S. Smith of Houma, 

or streamlined barge Kirby 28161. 

I might not see Born Again or 

Salvation, although

I saw Salvation of Nola on a previous trip.  

Good Shepherd I may have seen before too, or maybe it’s just a familiar name.

 

These lodges–sometimes single and other times in groups– on islands accessible only by boat and

really blue herons  . . . intrigue me, and as the other French speakers of North America say . .  . Je me souviens…  I’ll add  je reviendrai.

Names like Cullen Landolt and

Mike Mitchell . . . make me wonder who the namesakes are or were. 

Note anything unusual to sixth boro eyes on the stern of Matthew James?

I don’t believe I’ve ever seen folks working under a parasol up here, but there I saw it quite frequently, and the heat tells me it’s a health and safety issue.

All the photos in this post were taken in the first half day of the trip, the only portion we did on the GICW, but  . . . a lot of boats work what seemed like uninhabited land on the water’s edge, like Jeff Montgomery, 

Bill Tullier,

Squaw

Mr Leon, 

Intra Responder, 

and to end this part of the recap . . .

Zoie, which I’m not sure how to pronounce like . . . rhymes with Zoey or Joie….

All photos, WVD, who has more recaps with new photos to come.

It’s been months since I used this title, so let me play some catch-up.

with a RORO and an ULCV.   The RORO RCC Africa is the oldest vessel in this post, launched 2004. Its dimensions are 656′ x 105′ and at this moment it’s heading from the east to the west side of South American via the Magellan Strait. Triton, 2016, is the largest vessel here:  1210′ x 167′ and it’s currently heading for Colon PA.

Wye River is the tug meeting above;  Kirby Moran provides an assist to a tanker below.

Angel Star, 2006,  is the shortest in this post, measuring 590′ x 105′ and it has recently transited the Panama Canal on its way to the Baja California port of La Paz, seen here in a post from three years ago. 

Another ULCV,  Cosco Shipping Orchid, 1200′ x 157′, is the newest vessel here, launched in 2019 and currently making for Busan.   Note the gaggle of Centerlines, once Bouchards.

In closing, two years ago I’d not heard of Wan Hai, or if I had, it made such little impact that I quickly forget the name. Wan Hai 315 dates from 2006, and measures 699′ x 105.’  At this time, she’s headed for the Suez from this departure out of the sixth boro of NYC.

Speaking of names, Wan Hai is as creative with names of ships as trucking fleets are with tractors or I am with series of blog posts.  This one was Wan Hai 315.

All photos and any errors, WVD, who never ceases to be amazed by the range of traffic calling in the sixth boro, often the forgotten boro.

or this should be X-otics 32, my second space ship this month, the first being Jacklyn here.  And that this Bob should come into the sixth boro the same day Artemis 1 had intended to fly is quite remarkable. 

This exotic started life over a decade ago in the orange/yellow livery of ECO, named for its founder, Mr Edison Chouest, whose obituary from 14 years ago  starts out calling him a shrimp fisherman.

Our star put on a grand display for this space ship.

I hope Mr Musk was suitably impressed.

Currently Bob, named for an astronaut, works for SpaceX, hence the white X on the black bulkhead. Dr. Bob Behnken has some noteworthy accomplishments.

This exotic is truly unusual.  I’m not sure why or for how long they are in the boro, but it appears

a haircut and a shave might be in order.

All photos, WVD, who previously posted about a NASA space [delivery] ship here not quite a decade ago.

Wow!  August almost passed us by without my doing a glance back to a decade ago.  McCrews is now in Philly I’m told.   Reliance and Justine are still with McAllister.  Lynx was sold foreign  and experienced an incident while being delivered, although I’m not sure how that turned out.  Barents and Yankee both were refurbished by Donjon:  Barents Sea is now Atlantic Enterprise and Yankee is now Signet Atlantic and sans upper wheelhouse.   Mark McAllister was scrapped, and Na-Hoku under the same name works for a company  based in Charleston SC.

 Ellen McAllister here was bringing in the future Alex McAllister, which has gone on to spend a lot of time working in the sixth boro, although I’ve not noticed her recently.

Patrice (had just had a tragic delivery fire in this photo)  and Bruce still work based out of the sixth boro.

 

I never did see Yankee after her upper wheelhouse was removed.  I may have to return to the GOM if I ever want to see her.

Duty is now Nydia P, and I’d have to go to Puerto Rico to see her.

Ireland became Hoppiness, and has been converted to a liveaboard on Lake Ontario but headed the inland waterways of the TVA system.

Labrador Sea is now Vane’s Brooklyn.

And finally, here’s a mixed set:  OSG 350 and OSG Vision still work under those names, Amy Moran became Stasinos John Joseph, and Scotty Sky became a snow bird and sails the Caribbean.

All August 2012, WVD, who after reflecting on all those changes admits to not being the same person as in August 2012 any more either.

 

How about a “twofer” today . . . two exotics for the price of one, both in the sixth boro at the same time.  GO Discovery was over at Bayonne Dry Dock and has since headed out to the “survey site,” which I’m thinking means sites.  More about the layout of this hull #2 from New Generation Shipbuilders of Houma can be found here

She’s part of the GuiceOffshore (GO) fleet.  She has worked with SpaceX in the past.  The current SpaceX fleet has the most unusual names, like Of Course I Still Love You, Just Read the Instructions, and A Shortfall of Gravitas, not surprising given the owner, CEO, and chief engineer.  Ms. Tree and Ms. Chief are quite clever also.   Might a Ms. B. Haven be in the offing?

Meanwhile, taking on fuel in the sixth boro was Endeavour, formerly Deep Endeavour.

This 1999 vessel has since left for Charleston. 

 

Otherwise, I can’t tell you much about here.

All photos, WVD. 

Previous GO vessels in the boro can be seen here.

Numbers are hard to keep straight, but I think we’re up to 11 in this series.  The most relevant preceding post would be “High and Dry 8” here.

Yesterday I think I caught Saint Emilion getting hauled, with quite a few folks looking on, although maybe that number of folks is standard.  Doing the honors was the mobile boat hoist over at Bayonne Dry Dock & Repair.  

See the ladder in the water to the left?  I’m supposing it’s standard practice to have divers ensure that the slings are properly positioned before hauling out.

 

 

All photos, WVD.  Because so many interesting shapes of a vessel can be seen only when it’s hauled out, I’ve done a long series of posts on such.  This might be a stretch, but when exposed, the hidden lines and features of a vessel can seem a bit like nudity.

No . . . what follows is not a count down.

But here was nine, and eight is already linked above, 

seven,

six,

five,

four and H & D Caddells 4

three and an erroneous three.  [See . . . I have a challenge with numbers.  I’ll have to go back and renumber at some point. Unintentionally duplicating numbers is the result of working too fast.]

two and another erroneous or at least inconsistent II

one

and then there were others, only some of which werePegasus and Patty Nolan…and some schooners . . .

I’m always so grateful when folks send me photos, especially like all of these.  Tony A catches all kinds of boats I miss, like

Anne-Sofie earlier this month in Albany.  I’m not sure what the cargo in and/or out was, but these SAL vessels get around.   Does anyone know if that “float” center just under the crane hook serves as an outrigger for loading/unloading crane movement?  As of this posting, she’s already in Genoa.

Here’s more from Tony . . . Dimuro Clark had been Turecamo Girls for over half a century and appeared on this blog many times. 

 

I like their logo.

And finally, long-time reader and sometimes contributor, Tommy Bryceland sends these photos of a local boat–which appeared in yesterday’s post–far from homewaters,

with guided missile frigate and ex USS Boone on the hip in Campbeltown Loch in Scotland last week.  Atlantic Salvor towed it there from the Philadelphia Navy Yard.  The ship is expected to be used as a target in an upcoming live fire exercise out in the Atlantic Ocean.  Would the frigate be anchored during such an exercise?  I’m imagining it’s expected to sink upon termination of the firing.

Many thanks to Tony A and Tommy for sharing these photos.

It’s been over 12 years that this boat has had this appearance;  before then, it was orange.

Ten years ago, this one was green.

I must admit I’ve gotten used to seeing them both in Donjon blue, and they look great.

A year ago, this boat had not yet entered the state of New York, but when she did, I caught her here and here about to enter the NYS Canal system from the Great Lakes.

Since then, she’s been quite busy.

As have all the Donjon blue boats.

Have a look at Meagan Ann in the 2013 tugboat races here.  And speaking of those races, here and here are photos/videos of Meagan Ann and other from 2009. 

Has anyone heard specifics about a 2022 tugboat race in the sixth boro?  Here are some photos of boats that participated in the 1952 (!!!!) race on the Hudson.

All photos, any errors, WVD.

While I’m at it, let me throw in a photo from the tugboat race in 2010.

 

 

 

Centerline Logistics is a relatively new name.  Or should that be pronounced “sent her lion”?

The orange “centerline” is also gradually being added to the fleet.  Andrea was here three years–and sans upper house-– before she became a lion boat;  here was first I saw that part of her logo. 

Name this one?

Lightning has recently returned to the boro.   Named for a horse?   

So here’s the unit pushing Long Island, and getting an assist

from Lightning.

All photos, any errors, WVD.

 

Sometimes you need a spell out of the routine to spawn new ideas.  My long sweltering time in the GOM this summer communing with alligators and sugar cane may have had that effect.  In this case, the “new” idea–as it often is–is to go back to an old idea, but twist it in a new way.  I started “non-random” tugs way back in 2009 here.   I’d done a variation on this actually two years earlier with the “bronze” fleet and here and here.  There have been others too, but I think you catch my drift.

So let’s go.  Between my two stints in the torrid GOM, I was hoping to catch a photo of one of the sixth boro’s “newest” names, Brinn Courtney.  Below is closest I got, and it was certainly a photo I’d not run without context. 

After returning, I caught John Joseph–when i first saw it in the distance I thought it was the elusive Brinn Courtney.

A short time later, I saw it in formation with USCGC Willow, although I wasn’t sure if John Joseph was escorting Willow, or vice versa.

A few days later, I caught John Joseph on the move again.

Imagine my joy then to catch Brinn Courtney twice yesterday, once pushing a barge and then

light.

All photos, WVD.  More fleet sets to come.

More past sets can be seen here and here and here

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