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Between January and April 1905, Newport News Shipbuilding delivered four 231′ ferries to the Hoboken Ferry CompanyElmira arrived two months before its better known sister, Binghamton.  Click here to learn why Elmira and Binghamton were called “hand bombers,” and a whole lot more.

Elmira was scrapped in 1983, but I’d guess this photo was taken in the 1950s or even earlier.   I’m not sure of the timing that steam was discontinued.

Look at all the steam tugs and ferries then in the harbor between Manhattan and Hoboken. Maybe someone can more accurately place this photo in time.  Is that a PRR steam tug between Elmira and the Hoboken terminal tower?

Arlington was launched from the Burlee Dry Dock in Port Richmond, Staten Island in November 1903 and entered service in March 1904.  She had two sister, Tuxedo and Goshen, each 224′  loa x 64′ (another source says 206′ x 43′).  Arlington made her last run from Pavonia to Chambers Street in 1958, at the end of over 97 year years of continuous operation for the Pavonia Ferry Company.  “Stories of a Deckhand” by Raymond J. Baxter includes just that from the perspective of someone who worked on this boat.

Thanks to the Canal Society for use of these photos, interesting although connected to the Barge Canal in the same way the sixth boro is.

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