You are currently browsing the monthly archive for March 2021.

Janice Ann Reinauer came on line at some point in the past few months, but this is my first viewing light.

She’s bigger and more powerful than the previous boat by that name:  113′ x 35′ v. 82′ x 24′ and 4720 hp v. 2200.

She might be a carbon copy of the 2013 Dean Reinauer, in the distance, although I’m sure upgrades have been built in.

Cape Fear came into service right about the same time as Janice Ann.

She’s one of two of the latest 3000 hp in the Vane fleet;  her twin in Cape May, which I’ve not seen.

Here Cape Fear goes into the notch, alongside Potomac to her starboard side . . . as Jacksonville passes.  Potomac and Jacksonville are 4200 hp boats.

 

All photos, WVD.

The erudite readers of tugster know Evergreen doesn’t have a single vessel, the one that caused some anxiety in Suez recently.  In fact, the fleet comprises about 200 ships, of different sizes or classes.  The L and F classes currently call in the sixth boro.  The teu capacity for the F class is just over 12000.  In other words, the vessel that departed the sixth boro this morning holds 8000 fewer containers than Ever Given, coming in over 20000 teu.    Another way of visualizing it is this:  add all the containers of this F class boat AND all from an L class vessel . . . and you’ll have one Ever G class.  And consider this, an Evergreen A class is on the drawing board . . .  coming in between 22k and 23k containers!

Enough alphabetizing . . . Ever Faith is currently on its way to Baltimore.

 

 

 

All photos, WVD, who had a hard time coming indoors today to download these photos and post.

The Soo is open, the SL Seaway is open, and now after 6 days, 3 hours, and 38 minutes of blockage . . . the Suez is open.

I’d started this post before Ever Given was freed and intend it as a survey of some of the tugs involved, here from largest to smaller. Obviously dimensions do not tell the whole story;  in fact, dimensions tell only the story of length and width, but most of these are not harbor tugs.  The largest is Alp Guard, 243′ x 69′ and generating just over 24000 hp.

Next are two quite similar Suez Canal Authority tugs, Ezzat Adel (226′ x 52′)

and Baraka 1, same dimensions, built in 1993 one year before Ezzat Adel.

Carlo Magno comes in at 180′ x 49′, still larger than anything in the sixth boro.

Now we’re at the scale of sixth boro tugs, although several in the boro are larger.  Basel 2 measures in at 119′ x 38′.

Salam 8 and 9 were there, coming in at 115′ x 36′

Svitzer Port Said 1 and 2 measure 104′ x 43′ and generate 6772, very similar to the largest sixth boro assist tugs.  For example Capt. Brian and Ava M. generate 6770 hp.

Mosaed 3 comes in at 98′ x 36′.

Of course, tugs weren’t the only factor.  Someone like Resolve or Smit Salvage taking charge is needed to orchestrate the efforts, which include dredging as well. If you’ve not seen this interview with salvage master Nick Sloane, it’s an enlightening listen.

Credit for photos is embedded in the photos;  click on each to see it.

Any errors, WVD.

Was this an event just waiting to happen?  See here.

 

March 25, 2011 was a busy day.  L to r, Maurania III, USNS Yano, Resolute, McAllister Responder, McAllister Girls, Amy Moran . . . with a K-Sea barge at the mooring, and some iconic structures.  None of these vessels in currently in the sixth boro.  Amy Moran is now John Joseph.

Let’s follow the USNS vessel first, as it’s assisted into the graving dock.  Yano is in Newport News at this time, 2021. 

Yano is an example of a US-flagged non-Jones Act vessel.

A bit later, more to the west, Davis Sea stands by to assist Taurus

and DBL 25 into a dock.  Taurus recently came to the boro from Philly as Joker.  Davis Sea is now Defender. 

The following day, Maurania III and

McAllister Girls sail British Serenity off the dock. Maurania III is now in Wilmington, and British Serenity is now Champion Timur and is in the Black Sea on a voyage that began in Indonesia.  Girls is laid up.

An hour later, Jennifer Turecamo assisted the big OSG 350 moved by

OSG Vision westbound.  Jennifer is in Tampa, and Vision runs in and out of Delaware Bay.

All photos and any errors, WVD, who notices the old Bayonne Bridge profile above.

For an update on Ever Given, click here.

And the answer to yesterday’s what and where Jay Michael off Bridgeport, CT….

Let’s try this:  which boat and where.  Some of you will quickly identify the tugboat and a bit later say the location.  Some of you might guess the company by the color of the tug.  Others of you will have no association at all.

I took these photos Tuesday of this week.

 

The boat has appeared several times on this blog and calls irregularly in the sixth boro.

 

Here’s the best clue.

 

Answer tomorrow.  All photos, WVD.

I had something different planned for today, but one does not plan the news.  Since I’m map-oriented, I’m sharing what I found on the “maps” of the Ever Given story, the 20,000 teu+ container ship acting as a cork in a bottleneck.

Below is the context for the story.  If you’re not that familiar with the bigger context, grab a map showing the SE corner of the Mediterranean Sea.  On the map below, notice Alexandria, Cairo, and Tel Aviv.  Aqaba is lower right.  Color code is as follows:  red = tankers, green = freighters, aqua = tugboats.  Also note the absence of traffic for a portion of the canal (that line) going southward from Port Said. Normally there’d be red, green, or aqua icons there.

Here’s a closeup of the location where Ever Given has wedged itself across the canal.

Click on the image below to get a recent Reuters story.  Here from space.com is another story with great images.

Note the aqua-colored  tugboats, out of scale, attempting to extricate the cargo vessel.

With a cork in the bottle, so to speak, ain’t nuttin goin’ nowhere, as I might say in a different setting.

The image below shows more context than the image above.  Suppose your rush order too big for air cargo happened to be on one of those ships.  Actually, there’s cargo halted there for hundreds of millions of folks.

The image below shows bottled up southbound traffic (mostly) unable to proceed beyond Ever Given south of Qaryat al Jana’in.

The image below shows the backup so far in the Mediterranean, again mostly southbound traffic, mostly Asia bound.

It ain’t over yet, and it takes a lot more fuel to get between Europe and Asia by sailing around Capetown.

Personal note:  I sailed from Jeddah to Port Suez 35 years ago and saw lots of traffic on the Red Sea in both directions.

Credit to marine traffic.com for allowing these views.

FB won’t display a preview photo because I made them full size.  Oh well.

Picking up from yesterday, Kimberly released her line on the lower recessed bitt of MSC Bilbao and spun around to head back home.  Jonathan C goes to retrieve the docking pilot.

Victoria Highway comes in . . . .

Life saving steel cage?

 

Lines are prepped for the next job.

Brendan Turecamo is on the stern.

Meanwhile, over in Global, there’s a lot of shifting going on.

See the crane operator’s cabin beneath the rail just to the right of the red/white tip of the rail?  An operator sits there the whole shift shuttling backing and forth lifting and lowering containers more than a hundred feet below.

Frances leaves for her next job.

Emily Ann moves a brace scows  . . . likely to Claremont.

And Bruce A. comes over to  hang on the wall between jobs.

Here ends my spring morning series.  On a day like this, I couldn’t be happier.  I’ve posted only ten percent of the photos I took, of course, in the interest of creating some narrative.  Obviously each of these photos could develop into a narrative in itself.  And other photos creating differing narratives remain in my archives . . . for now.

All photos, WVD.

Posting twice in a day means either good news . .  or not so good.  Many thanks to Luke Gayson for sending me this shot of the 1907 Pegasus taken in the KVK this morning.

If you do FB, here’s a link to the project.

From the tugster archives, here was a flag of concern from 2015.

Here was a post from 2009.

Right now, I suspect this is bad news but I have no solid details.

From wikipedia, here.

 

Following from yesterday, which covered 0900 to 0930, today we pick up from the mystery vessel and do 0930 to 1000.  Identify this blue ship?

Here’s a clue and a hint that traffic is busy, as another vessel comes around Bergen Point.

 

As MSC Bilbao clears the bridge, you get a sense of all the boats over on the NW side of Staten Island.  Anyone know the passenger vessel at the shipyard to the left?  I don’t.

As MSC Bilbao approaches from the west and Adams heads out to sea, a RORO arrives.

The random curves of waves and reflections seem just perfect as a vessel named Bilbao passes by.

 

x

Kimberly has released the line to Bilbao and is about to rotate to starboard and head back west.

All photos, WVD.

 

The other morning was without wind and busy, so this next “hour” is actually 30 minutes, and these are only a few of the photos I took between 0900 and 0930 of this extraordinary morning from my single vantage point.

A team of Dann Marine tugs leave the dock, framing Nicole Leigh at the Reinauer dock.

Vane’s Brooklyn leaves her dock;  notice the Moran barn (red with the white M) and Pegasus at the Metropolitan dock.

Charles D heads to job.

Bulker Maina heads for sea, passing Elandra Blu and

Marjorie comes to retrieve the docking pilot.  Do you see four people in the photo below?  Elandra tankers are based in Latvia.

The calm here is barely broken by MSC Korea.

Brendan waits to retrieve the pilot.  Note the scrubber and its effects on emissions?

Over by IMTT  Glory and Potomac sand by with their barges.

And we’ll leave it here, actual 28 minutes elapsed . . .  name that approaching ship?

All photos, WVD.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,478 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives