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This photo of aframax BW Thalassa I took on Friday.  Note the green BW slash about a third of the shiplength back from the bow. 

Here’s a photo from Saturday, 24 hours later, after rain and fog have moved in.  Note the green BW slash on the tanker beyond the Evergreen ship?

Ever Focus appears to have a maximum load aboard as she speeds toward Colon PA.  A bit beyond Ambrose, AIS showed her at 19.2 kts, 22 mph.

See the Manhattan skyline?  Not much.  A few outlines appears along the shore of Manhattan, but nothing more shows.  The new Janice Ann Reinauer is among the tug/barge units anchored there.

Bruce A. heads for a job,

as do Miriam and Helen.

CL Christina was inbound for Claremont, but again, fog obscured the bright shiny detail.  Of course, the scrap loaded in Claremont has no bright shiny detail either.

All photos, WVD, who finds the fog frustrating even though it was around 50 degrees F, but this is how the harbor looks sometimes.

Unrelated:  I just finished Shadow Divers, an account of the discovery of a U-boat wreck 60 miles off Point Pleasant.  It’s a compelling read.  It turns out there’s a counter-narrative also, Shadow Divers Exposed by Gary Gentile. 

Here are the birds.  Now what’s the rest of the story?

Part of the story is told by these flags, US courtesy, German registry, and is that a pilot flag?

She was large for a 2008 container ship:  1098′ x 140′ with a capacity of 8606 teu.

 

I’d love to know more about accessing that lifeboat, given the cargo configuration.

And where are the birds?

 

Doubleclick on that last photo to see the closeup . . . you can almost hear the excitement!

All photos, WVD.

 

Here are previous installments.  What’s different here is that in this case I’m inside  the Narrows and shooting to the east and north.

Yankee passes in light before sunrise.

I rotate the lens 90 degrees to the right and Margaret stands by

along with James D to support Maersk Chicago, anchored in Stapleton.  As I write this,  24 hours later, the container ship is leaving port, although her destination shows NYC as both “from” and “to”….

Meanwhile Mary Turecamo comes out of its base in the KVK

just as the sun rises above the horizon and its cloudbank and gets reflected.

All photos, WVD, who thinks this set perfectly illustrates why I take photos at dawn whenever I can.  It’s worth getting up and out.

Chem Mercury approaches the VZ.

The surprise for me was the registry:  Luxemburg.  She was in one day and out the next.  The 2018 build has capacity of just under 20000 dwt.

Markos I is a 45999 dwt and  2005 build with more than twice the capacity of Chem Mercury.

Solar Katherine, a 2020 build with a capacity of 49699 dwt, here has Potomac alongside.

With Emily Miller doing a lap, Asprouda (2013) has the capacity of over 74000 dwt.

 

 

Phoenix Admiral is a 2011 build, with a capacity of

114024 dwt.  She’s a frequent carrier of crude into the sixth boro from Point Tupper.

And Songa Winds, 2009, has a similar capacity to Chem Mercury, at the start.

All photos, WVD, in the past month.

 

 

 

She looks bigger than the 981′ she is.  By today’s sixth boro standards, she’s not, and with a capacity for 9971 teu, she’s nowhere near the 15,072 of CMA CGM Panama, which I missed this week.

 

I’ve not noticed the wings to add lateral visibility near the stern, or

the starboard-offset stack.

As for the name, I’d thought the reference South American; in fact, it’s Asian, referring to high peaks shared by India and Pakistan, and a river that’s a tributary of the Indus.

All photos, WVD.

Justine has been back in the sixth boro awhile now after quite some time away.

She’s a 1982 product of Jakobson, one of the last half dozen built there.  From this angle she reminds me of Siberian Sea, now Mike Azzolino.  She works with 4000 hp.

Recent days have seen a convergence of the Cape-class,

Cape Lookout,

Cape Henry,

and Cape Canaveral, here pushing DBL 101.

They are attractive 5000 hp boats.

Also pushing an oil barge, Patriot, in fact, was Robert IV.

Usually that barge has Mary H as power.

Nicole Leigh finished fueling, brought down the red flag, and spun around to rejoin her barge.

Her Caterpillars deliver a total of 7200 hp to her wheels.

And closing, it’s the 6770 hp Capt. Brian A. escorting Zim Tarragona out to sea.

All photos, WVD.

 

I’ve seen blue, orange, and whiteGreen is the only remaining Seatrade specialized reefer I’ve yet to photograph.  The other day I caught Seatrade Red outbound.

Jonathan C. accompanied her out to retrieve the pilot.

Seatrade was established in 1951, and chose to focus on small reefer vessels.  The fleet is comprised of about 50 vessels, but there are only five in the “colour” class of reefer container carriers.

Jonathan C. accompanied her out to retrieve the pilot, and then spun around

for the next job.  I count six people in the photo above.

Seatrade Green just left Tauranga NZ with an ETA at the Panama Canal westside for March 11, so at some point in late March the Green could be back in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD. And below, from March 2012, is a photo of another type of Seatrade reefer, Buzzard Bay.

Barrington Island, which used to be a regular in the sixth boro, is also part of their fleet.

 

Location 1?  Do you know this tug?

Location 2.  Tug Rachel is with this

unusual looking cargo ship, Lihue.

Viking pushes southbound past Castle Rock and

Comet northbound along the Hudson River.

Near the west end of the East River, it’s C. Angelo and

near the east end, it’s Navigator with GT Bulkmaster heading west and Ellen McAllister, east.

Working near the TZ Bridge some years back, it’s Tappan Zee II.

And finally, on the northern end of Lake Huron, it’s Avenger IV

heading for the Soo.

To answer the first question, that’s Coney Island with the Goethals Bridge and Linden refinery in the background, making this the Elizabeth River in Elizabethport NJ.

And the second question, it’s Seattle.  Photo thanks to Kyle Stubbs. Lihue, ex-President Hoover III, ex-Thomas E. Cuffe, 1971,  may be at the end of Rachel‘s towline along the coast of Oregon, heading for the Panama Canal and then . .  . Texas for scrap.  She’s probably the last of LASH (C8-S-81e) vessels built, along with President Tyler IV and President Grant V, scrapped more than 10 years ago.  She’s been a survivor.

Click on the photo below to learn more about a 1970 container ship still moving boxes, up to 482 teu at a time.  Explorador!

All other photos, WVD, at points in various places since 2017.

This photo was taken from the parking lot on the Belt Parkway, a half mile east of the VZ Bridge looking toward the Coney Island Light.  See the ship?   It’s the speck on the horizon almost dead center of the photo.  How far away would you guess it to be?

A few seconds later, the same ship here is magnified 12X.  

And again . . .  few seconds later but magnified 50X.  

Meanwhile, as you calculate the distance off above, here are some photos of the same vessel as it arrived in the boro about six weeks ago.

So guess in nautical miles with a decimal point?  Go back and look at the top photo again if you wish.

That was Kirby Moran on the starboard bow.

All photos, WVD.  According to my magic device, the ship was 5.6 nm away when the photo was taken.

I saw the approaching tanker and immediately thought back to a morning before work back in April 2008, reported here.

The water had the same calm, maybe a similar state of tide, as the two tugs and Seamuse floated in. 

 

The homonymous sea mews would apply in this photo as well.

 

As of this writing, the crude tanker is discharging its contents in Sewaren.  To the right on the photo, that’s Seaways Yellowstone, discharging at Linden.

All photos, WVD.

 

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