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At first light, Navigator passes a docked Saint Emilion

This 1981 build has called the sixth boro her home since 2015.  Saint Emilion (2007) has been here in two previous liveries and names.

Barney Turecamo was launched in 1995.  Note her cutaway forefoot.

Barney, married to Georgia, gets an assist from Doris Moran, 1982, as she departs the dock.

 

Meaghan Marie, 1968, follows a box ship into port but is not involved in the assist.

Meaghan Marie is a former fleetmate of Margaret Moran, 1979, doing the assist.

Emily Ann, 1964, moves a sanitation scow.

 

And finally, coming in from sea with a dump scow, it’s Captain Willie Landers, 2001.

When she first appeared on this blog in 2015, she had a prominent mast, not an upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD.

January, once every four years, involves a formality that we mark today.  Inaugurate has a strange derivation, you figure it out.  With this post, I’m in no way intending to divine futures.  Really it’s just sets of photos taken four years apart. 

Ice and lightship yacht Nantucket floated in the harbor in mid January 2009. Do you remember what else was literally in the harbor?

Weeks tugs stood by ready to move a barge underneath the airplane when Weeks 533 lifted the Airbus 320 from harbor waters that had cushioned its fall . . . twelve years ago. 

Next inauguration day, 2013, I watched fishermen drag clams from the bottom of Gravesend Bay.

Rebel, destined not to run much longer, pushed a barge across the Upper Bay with an incomplete WTC beyond.  Many more details had not yet sprouted on the Manhattan skyline.

Mid January 2017 . . . CMA CGM Nerval headed for the port with Thomas J. Brown off its starboard.  Here‘s what I wrote about this photo and others exactly four years ago.

Nerval still needed to make its way under the yet-to-be completed raising of the Bayonne Bridge, assisted by JRT Moran.  This view was quite different in mid January 2017.   As of today, this container ship in on the Mediterranean on a voyage between Turkey and Morocco.

All photos, WVD, taken in mid January at four-year intervals.  Nothing should be read into the choice of photos.  Sorry I have no photos from January 20, 2005, because back then I didn’t take as many photos, and four years before that, I was still using a film camera, took fewer photos in a year than now I do on certain days, and that skyline above was very different.

My inaugural event . . .  cleaning my desk, my office, and my kitchen.   If you’re looking for an activity, something might need cleaning. Laundry?   Yup, work after work.  All inaugurations call for clean ups.

And if you want to buy that lightship yacht above, here‘s the info.

 

Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

This Odfjell tanker has 47 tanks!

I took this recently along the KVK.   Today the 1998 tanker is in the Mississippi River heading for New Orleans.

Guess the age here?

She’s just two years old, launched in January 2019. 

Elandra Willow has departed for the next job, but this morning Elandra Oak arrived in the sixth boro. Here is the rest of the fleet. 

Phoenix Admiral is a regular here, this time arriving after five days from Point Tupper. 

Of the three tankers here, she’s by far the largest.  The other two are 600’x 32′, and Phoenix Admiral is 820′ x 144′.

 

All photos, WVD, who has several times prepared a “random tankers” post and several times left them in the “drafts” folder.

More “threes” here.

What’s this?

I’m just trying to figure this out.  My best guess is that suspended from a 20-ton capacity A-frame is a set of underwater hands, a sampling device, a seafloor-drill, all tallied 14 tons of instruments  and tools in a seafloor frame. 

I can’t tell you the division of labor between the equipment lowered/raised through an approximately 10′ x 10′ moon pool by the 90′ derrick and the seafloor drill.  My guess is the the seafloor drill can function at great depth.   Note the Panamanian registry.

All those portlights . . .   relate to the 50+ crew the vessel can accommodate. 

The helideck . . . 62′ diameter, can accommodate helicopters of the Bell 412 type, i.e., up to about 3.5 tons. 

If you didn’t click on the equipment and specifications link earlier, my source for all I pretend to know here, you can click here now.  Since she was anchored in Gravesend Bay yesterday, the tide pushing her stern toward shore, I managed to get my first photos of her stern.   I have seen the vessel, working to amass wind farm bottom terrain data, several times since January 2018.   With the green light to transform South Brooklyn Marine Terminal into a dedicated wind farm construction hub, I suspect some interesting and exotic vessels will be transiting the Narrows in the next few years.

All photos and attempted interpretation, WVD.

Maybe a reader out there can explain how this equipment really works and what super-detailed examples of bathymetric chart of the New York Bight look like.

It was my first time to see her.  She arrived this morning after a monthlong voyage from Busan, which she departed on December 17.  With her containers all squared away, I’d gather she has delivered a full load.

CSCL operates eight of these vessels, valued at $117 million each.

The sight of these giants gives pause.  China’s  first container ship, Ping Xiang Cheng, launched in 1978 for a route between Shanghai and ports of eastern Australia carried 162 containers!  Their first service to US ports came in 1981.

Who then could have imagined these.

Mariner gear in 2021 . . . it’s not what I’d expect.

With the two crew above and these four, this must be half or more of the deck crew. 

 

For an afternoon’s reading, click here for an analysis of the shipyard which builds these behemoths and many other types of ships.

All photos this morning, WVD.

Find a great diagram here, as well as this quote:  “container carrying capacity has increased 1200% since 1968.”  This increased size drives developments in escort tugs.

As of 2021, the sixth boro has accommodated vessels no larger than 15,000 teu, like CMA CGM Argentina.  These can be called mother ships, since they can call in only a limited number of ports in the US for reasons of draft, air draft, and crane size. Vying for position as the largest, Liebherr appears to have a 25-row crane design, while ZPMC has a 26-row product.

Count them, it looks like Argentina has 20 rows across.  Imagine each of these row, each of these containers, as towed by a truck on the highway lane beside you.

YM Wellhead, an odd name in my opinion, is one of 20 W-class 14,000 teu ships.   World was the first of this class that I caught. 

 

She departed the sixth boro yesterday, sans the container that crossed the VZ as she made her way out.

Back in spring 2017, Cosco Development was the largest container ship to transit the new locks in Panama.  Her capacity is just over 13,000 teu.

 

At least half dozen Hyundai vessels have called in the sixth boro of late, all around 13000 teu.

I was surprised when the docking pilot boarded up the companionway.

 

Cosco Shipping Camellia is one of more than half dozen Cosco Shipping “flower-class” vessels to call hewre, all around 13,500 teu.

 

Orchid is a sister vessel, and in the next day or so, Sakura will arrive.

The most powerful escort tugboats in the sixth boro shrink in size alongside these behemoths.

All photos and interpretation of info, WVD, who wonders what the next milestone of any sort the sixth boro will see.

Enjoy more late afternoon photos here . . .  like Alexandra, passing in front of a number of cranes, both on the water, near the water, and atop buildings.

Ava transits the Con Hook Range, with three East River bridges in the background.

Miriam heads in the direction of the Bayonne Bridge, with two Arthur Kill bridge and the Linden refinery in the background.

Janet D with a crane barge passes here in front of a lower Manhattan, and a reprise of those cranes.

Brian Nicholas here brings DS159 eastbound for a refill.

Ellen McAllister weaves between KVK vessels on its way to a job.

Gulf Coast transits the KVK in front of Sailors Snug Harbor, with cranes at Caddells defining points in the western sky.

And to close, it’s Calusa Coast with barge Delaware, recently returned from five or so years in the Great Lakes.   Note the Statue, the south end of Ellis Island, and the Jersey City wall of buildings in the distance.

All photos, WVD.

Evening twilight rarely finds me at the KVK.  I should go there more often.

That’s the 1960 Pelham, originally launched as Esso Pelham.

For a 60 year old machine, she still looks good.

Back before the Esso name was phased out in 1972, she must have been a formidable tugboat.

 

All photos, WVD.

The combinations in the sixth boro might surprise you, cargo and clams, for example.

Mary Virginia crossed Gravesend Bay to get to the Upper Bay. Back in 2013 I posted photos of Mary Virginia here.

Over in Stapleton . . .  Giulianna Maria  . . .  is that an anchoring system?

Crossing Hell Gate and leaving 91st Street Marine Transfer Station behind, Never Enuff seems fishing bound, rod fishing.

Here’s a NJ crab boat.  Note the rake toward the stern.  That’s the Miller’s Launch fleet along the distant shoreline.

And although it carries the name Lobster Boy,

the rakes show they’re going for clams.

Commercial fishing vessels is a hallmark of winter in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD.

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