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Thanks to Skip Mildrum, here are some photos most appropriate for this day. 

It’s dark and overcast, but lights in the port and on the boats brighten up the night.  Winter began, I’m told, at 0502 this morning.

Early sunset or late sunrise, it doesn’t really matter . . . since the daylight will be getting longer again after today.

Many thanks to Skip for use of these photos.

Last year’s winter solstice post was here. Before that several years I did lighthouses  and before that . . . here.  See how other places do it here.

 

 

Ontario here means the province and the lake.  In the NE corner of the lake lies Picton and Picton Terminals, homeport of a tug called Sheri Lynn S.  Well, Sheri Lynn S just got a big sister, and one place to start the story is in UAE, Sharjah a few months back . . . in August.

Captain Tjalling van der Zee, of van der Zee Marine Services was engaged to deliver the new tug Amy Lynn D or ALD, a Damen 3209 Shoalbuster, the 9414 nm from UAE to Lake Ontario.  Capt. van der Zee shared most of these photos.  Here is more Damen Shoalbuster info. The first part of the voyage mostly circumnavigated the Arabian peninsula.  Having lived there for three years, I can imagine the heat topping at least 100 F.

Part of the voyage transited areas of “unrest” and armed guards were on board for any annoyances, but these folks were just fishing.  Jeddah was passed on October 17.

This is a view from the wheelhouse northbound in the Suez Canal around October 20.   Pilots were required.  Any guesses on the total number of pilots taken on this 9400+ nm trip?  Answer follows.

ALD passed Sicily on October 26 . . . .  it had traveled light until Algeciras SP, where a barge Jacob Joseph C carrying three Damen tugs was met.  The small tugs were to be delivered to Halifax and Montreal.

This is the view of the barge from ALD after traveling offshore following the Great Circle.

Azores Ponta Delgada was seen on November 14. By the way, any idea of crew number?  How about daily fuel consumption?  All answers to follow.

An ingenious “selfie” was managed, albeit with an unsatisfactory camera, when instruments showed ALD and tow crossing fairly near an eastbound ship.

Big seas were part of the experience.

The tow arrived in Halifax on December 6.  Mac Mackay documented the safe arrival here.  Thx, Mac.

Two of the small tugs, both Damen Stan 1205 class, were offloaded in Halifax.

The remaining tug arrived in Montreal, where

it was discharged. 

 

To enter the Saint Lawrence Seaway, Jacob George C was put on the nose and

I’m not sure who took this photo, but I borrowed it from the Picton Terminals FB page.  It shows the tug and barge easing into a SLSW lock.

On the last morning, Nathan Jarvis, working on Robinson Bay, took this of the homestretch as ALD and JJC passed Clayton NY. 

And finally . . .  ALD and Jacob Joseph C tie up at Picton Terminals. 

Many thanks to Picton Terminals and Capt. van der Zee for use of photos and time.  Any errors are mine.

Some answers, 25 pilots, 6 crew (1 Dutch/South African and 5 Filipino), and approximately 1200 gallons of fuel daily. Last but not least . . . 82 nights on the boat.


Arthur Tickle Engineering Works (ATEW) is now gone, but other marine service businesses (MSBs) remain.  I’ve long thought to do a series of posts about the MSBs like Caddells, GMD, Bayonne Drydock, Hughes Marine . . . and many others. 

A while back, Steve Munoz sent these along, and it’s taken me a bit to figure out how to place these photos, but that’s it . . . MSBs, a series I’d love to do, and I can start it here.  Steve’s father worked at ATEW for many years and until it closed in 1987. 

I’ll use Steve’s captions with my annotations in [  ].  Below   … “is a picture of the ATEW, established in 1904. Photo shows the delivery wagon and probably Arthur Tickle himself at the front door.  He died in 1945.”  [I wonder what the letters on the side of the horse wagon says, some precursor to FedEx?]

“This is the ATEW building housing the machine shop probably in the 1920s.”  [Is that a Ford?]

“Ship’s rudder being repaired in one of the shops.”

“This poster was published in the Maritime Activity Reports on November 15, 1945 showing the number and types of ships converted, repaired and altered, including some specific names, during the war. All of these repairs were completed along the Brooklyn waterfront. One of the conversions was the former MV Carnarvon Castle, a Union-Castle Line ocean liner before the war, requisitioned by the Royal Navy for conversion to an armed merchant cruiser and then converted to a troopship by ATEW in 1944.” 

[I looked up USAHS Aleda E. Lutz, USS Pontiac, USAT Colombie, USAT Kota Inten, USAT Cape Canso, MV Marechal Joffre, USADS Blemheim, and USADS Lock Knot. Some of those links have photos.]

“The steel yawl named Steel Sylph was built by the various shops at ATEW for Arthur Tickle, Jr. in the 1940-50s. I assume that it was launched in Brooklyn as the bow of a ship can be seen in the picture at the launching, but does not appear to be at Pier 4 as the BQE is not seen in the background.”  [Steel Sylph is listed as placing in the Newport to Annapolis race in 1947.]

[This is a very formal looking photo of an unidentified gent.  That would be a fun one to colorize.]

Steel Sylph was designed by Philip Rhodes.

“During WWII, ATEW leased a number of piers from the New York Dock (NYD) Company in Brooklyn south of the Brooklyn Bridge to repair military and commercial ships supporting the war. After the war, the ship repair business slowed down, but ATEW continued to repair ships into the 1960s at pier 4 such as the SS Comet Victory seen in this photo. Pier 4 was demolished sometime after the year 2000.”  [I presume this photo was taken from the promenade.  It might be fun to go there today and reframe/redo the shot of the skyline from 120 Wall to just south of the Staten Island ferry terminal.  Can anyone identify the tall rectangular building directly behind 120 Wall and obscuring most of 70 Pine?  In the foreground, that space is now Brooklyn Bridge Park, as seen from the Brooklyn Heights Promenade.]

“A bronze propeller was cleaned and repaired in the foundry shop and

returned to the SS American Aquarius, probably as a spare.”  [On the frame of the flatbed I read W. J. Casey, a trucking firm that still exists, although they’ve moved from Brooklyn Bergen Street to New Jersey.  Here‘s their site, which has some antique trucks from their past fleet. ]

“The SS Cape Catoche in the Hudson River on a hawser behind the tug Dalzelloch and the tug Fred B Dalzell alongside. The ship was going to/from the Jones Point reserve fleet in the 1950s. In the 1960s many ships were taken from the reserve fleet to Brooklyn where ATEW had the contract to prepare the ships for the Vietnam sealift. For one ship the capstans and winches were opened in the machine shop for USCG inspection and because the components were in such bad shape the whole ship failed inspection and was subsequently sold for scrap. This occurred with a number of the ships. ”  [Looking at the dates here, there may have been more than one SS Cape Catouche, although I’m not certain.  Clearly, this move was made in winter.]

“ATEW repaired the ship’s turbine and reinstalled it in the engine room on the SS Pomona Victory. My guess is that the ship was docked at Pier 4 Brooklyn as ATEW leased this pier for years from the NYDock Company. Note at least one Liberty ship docked in Manhattan across the East River having gun tubs and the ship having the turbine installed had a gun tub and life rafts indicating that this picture was taken during WW II or very shortly after since I do not see any guns.”  [This view of the Manhattan side south of the Brooklyn Bridge shows a very different place than is located there today.  Someone more familiar with that stretch of riverfront might enjoy identifying which buildings are still there;  I recognize the Woolworth Building directly below the suspended turbine, and 120 Wall and 70 Pine buildings to the left.  That opposite shore would be the area of South Street Seaport today;  I’d love to find a photo of that same area from the Manhattan side, maybe looking down Fulton Street.]

Many thanks to Steve Munoz for his comments and use of his photos. 

I caught this small open boat eastbound on the KVK.

She passed Ernest Campbell.  Clearly by her markings, she’s a survey vessel. 

Between traffic, they seemed to focus their work near the transition between the KVK and the ConHook Range . . .

returning to their area of interest, as I said, between traffic.

Work completed, they headed back west

from where they’d first come. 

That might be a cold job with minimal protection for employees of Aqua Survey Inc.  in

a crowded waterway . . .!

All photos, WVD.

It appears that Aqua-Survey Inc. (ASI) has another boat called RV Tesla, which I’d love to see.  I caught R. E. Hayes here over 10 years ago, also an ASI boat.

I look forward to seeing this wine transporter up close in a few days.  Meanwhile, hat tip to Bjoern Kils of NY Media Boat for getting this one.  Cargo . .  includes 18,000 bottles of French wine, many varieties.

Many thanks, Bjoern.  See his blog here.  See Grain de Sail website in English here.

It still says Eastern Star Dawn, but now it’s Toula!

She’s going to look great all buff and green.

Barry Silverton finally

has a lion on its stack!  All those birds?  It’s water teeming with the bunker, the bunker that recently drew a humpback into the Upper Bay.

Pelham, launched in 1960, is always a pleasant sight.  She has a list of previous names almost as long as my seasonal wish list this year.

Here she took a wake on the bow.

James William used the waters off the salt pile

as a turning basin.

And finally, after a long hiatus down south, CMT Pike has returned.  When i caught her, she was being pursued

by this container ship.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated but of interest, below . . .

yes, Grain de Sail is a 72′ schooner coming into the sixth boro with a 50-ton cargo hold, some of it refrigerated, bringing in French wine.  She’ll set up a market in the Brooklyn Navy Yard for about a week.  Contact info and an e-shop can be found here, although you’ll have to use a machine translate if you’re not up to functionality in French.  

Grain de Sail is involved in triangular  trade, French wine to here and the Caribbean, and then Caribbean chocolate and other products to France . . . .  Something similar in sail freight  domestically has been done by Ceres and more recently by Apollonia.  The most recent international sailing cargo into the sixth boro that I know of was Black Seal, a three-masted schooner.

This post features eight tankers, all photos taken in the past month or so. As you look through these, see if you can determine the following:  the longest, the shortest, the most capacious, three of exactly the same dimensions, the newest, and the oldest.

1.  LRI Carrier,

2.  BW Kronborg,

3.  Qikiqtaaluk W.

ditto

4.  Kibaz,

5.   Silver Ginny

6.  Dakota Strength

7. and 8.    Marlin Magnetic and Seapike

the longest:  LRI Carrier at 1076′

the shortest: Qikiqtaauk W. at 492′

the most capacious: Dakota Strength at 115878 dwt.  Although it’s shorter than LRI Carrier, it’s significantly beamier.

three of exactly the same dimensions:   Kibaz, Silver Ginny, and Marlin Magnetic at 600′ x 105′

the newest:  Marlin Magnetic . . . 2019

the oldest:  Kibaz  . . . 2004

all photos, data, WVD.

The ONE Apus “dump” must have some folks wondering how containers are secured.  The answer is lashing, and it is not new, but it has changed over centuries.  Today’s lashing rods are an outgrowth of containerization, attempts to prevent what happened with ONE Apus and many other vessels.  See the turnbuckles on the lower ends of the lashing rods, to tighten not too much but just right.

See more turnbuckles  here, with the top ends connecting near the corner twist locks.

Here you see lashing rods between each of the stacks. Lashing rods bolster the twist lock connections, lower and upper corners, between containers on a stack. 

Here closer up you can see the rods and the twist locks.  Lashing requirements can be learned here. The gray structure below is a lashing bridge, which serves both as a platform for crew who attach the lashings and an anchor for the lashing rods.  On corners of containers are interlocking cones.  A short video on the hazards can be seen here.

Lashing bridges throughout the vessels can be seen clearly when a vessel carries no containers above the deck.

ACL prides itself on never having lost a container overboard because of these substantial structures between rows of containers.

Looking elsewhere around some ships, you may see a panel marked AMP.  No, it’s not an amplifier for the crew rock band.  AMP, alternate marine power, allows a vessel to plug into “shore power,” thereby reducing emissions in port.  You may have heard of “cold ironing,” which this equipment facilitates;  anyone downwind benefits from the improved air quality.

Follow the blue stack downward to see the location of this AMP panel.

Another vessel, another configuration.

A few years ago, I saw one here on Cosco Prince Rupert

port stern quarter, and also on

MOL Gratitude.  I saw the first of these back in 2014 here.

And while we’re looking at details in the stern quarters, . . . check out the basket.  It’s certainly not the first hoop I’ve seen on a ship.  While we’re looking at this photo, check out the two roller fairleads, through which dock line is led to mitigate harmful line chafing.

All photos, WVD, who wishes you “happy looking.”

I can’t understand why, but I instantly recognized this schooner . . . which I saw a year and a half ago here

It was anchored in Gravesend Bay.

I still know nothing more about her I know a bit more about her . . . check the comments.  That looks like a pinked stern, which could make it a downrigged  65′ Tom Colvin design.  Rosemary Ruth was Colvin.  And I have an update on Rosemary Ruth, which I’ll post one of these days.

Ambergris, from SW Harbor ME.

All photos, WVD, who wonders if anyone knows the boat.

Those look like icicles, and beyond the icicled railing, that’s certainly a wreath decorated with CFR § 83.33 signalling device . . . aka bell.  And are those partial candy canes way in the distance?

And a Christmas . .  as well as all-year round star!

Seen from a different perspective, I think this is classy.

Thanks, Pegasus crew.  This is my first sighting of a sixth boro Christmas. 

All photos, WVD.

Last year, part 1 M was here. Since I’m early, there’s still time for more 2020 merry posts.  And of course, I welcome any photos sent in, with other people’s Christmas photos like these.  I shouldn’t have favorite tugster posts, but this 1,    2,    and   rank pretty high, especially because of the folks I met in the research process.

If you want to send paper merriment, there’s always bowsprite’s shop.

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