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ROROS of various sorts you can find here.  But let’s take three that have called in the sixth boro during this month.  These are three of many more.  See if you can rank them by age and size.    It should be fairly easy.  The three are Polaris Highway,

Paganella (which I erroneously thought was Pagan Ella),

and Grande Halifax.  In the photo below, see the three tugboats, of which only one was assisting.  Grande New York first arrived here in spring 2018, where the christening occurred.

So again . . . size and age, age and size.   A ”  Highway” sister vessel arrived here in fog a few years back.

 

 

Here are some details, like cooling water from the bow thruster,

port of registry,

and bow. 

And the results, by size, small to large, it’s Paganella, Grande Halifax, Polaris Highway.  By age, old to new, it’s Paganella, Polaris Highway, Grande Halifax. Paganella dates from 2009, Polaris, 2017, and Grande, 2018. 

Polaris Highway, a K Line pure car truck carrier,  encloses parking for 7500 CEUs (car equivalent units).    Think this way, a standard car has dimensions, but if the vessel is transporting trucks, the actual number will be different.

Grande Halifax, a Grimaldi vessel, has capacity of 6700 CEUs.

Paganella, named for an Italian mountain, is the oldest of the F. Laeicz line, and is rated at 5000 CEUs, still quite the number of cars. 

All photos and data interpretation, WVD.

This is an impressive load of scrap, pushed along on a barge CMT Y Not 2, which I’ve usually associated with piles of sand.

Given the height of the pile relative the wheelhouse,

a watchstander is positioned to maintain a clear view of the waterway.

Pushing this load is Mackenzie Rose,

 

Surprisingly, this load was headed for the Delaware River.

A decade ago, Mackenzie Rose was green and called Vernon C.

Back in June, I saw a similar load but on CMT Y Not 1 and towed by Daisy Mae.

All photos, WVD.

A big bridge and two large ships, Atlantic Sky , a

CONRO vessel, and

Hyundai Speed, part of the Together class of 13,082 teu vessels out working the oceans since 2012 already. 

Can anyone help me understand the yellowish tinge to that plume?

 

In contrast to a fully loaded Hyundai Speed,the 2012 Al Qibla had some vacancy although she’s capable of 13500 teus.

 

This is the wall of containers this bridge was raised for.

CMA CGM Mexico, and sister ships of the Argentina class, are the current biggest behemoths of the sixth boro.

YM Width (14000 teu) and

YM Warmth, 13892 teu,

are both CSCB in Taiwan built.

My vantage point, 20 years ago, would have been quite different.

All photos, WVD.

The smaller surprise was to see USCGC Beluga (WPB- 87325) traveling with speed from Sandy Hook into the Upper Bay. 

I don’t believe I’ve seen Beluga before, although she looks identical to the 70+ Protector class 87′ boats named for marine predators.  I didn’t realize that many marine predators existed, although once you start counting . . . they add up. More on parameters for replacing the WPBs here.

But what really surprised me was what Tony A mentioned about the blue/yellow vessel in the photo.  Of course, it’s R/VShearwater, the Alpine Ocean Seismic Survey boat that’s been creating a complex bathymetric picture of parts of the sixth boro.  I long thought she had an unusual design.  What I hadn’t known is

that she’s former USCG WSES-3.  WSES expands to “surface effects ships.”  Hull 1 of the WSES series, WSES-1, was built for the US Navy as 110BH, then modified and became USCGC Dorado, then back to the USN as SES-200 Sea Flyer, then IX-515.  That’s a lot of modification. More on that here (start near bottom of p 25) and here. For a photo of Shearwater, black hull and orange USCG stripe, click here.   For her Alpine tech specs, click here.

All photos, WVD, who enjoys learning from surprises.  Many thanks, Tony A.

It’s been a while since Lilac appeared here, but this illusion of the steamer under way on her own power was thrilling.  I’m not adept enough at photo manipulation to add the right measure of smoke from her stack.  

And yes, the prime mover here is Michael Miller, with Susan nearby as well.  .

Like a vessel steaming in from another era,

 

it was great to see Lilac under way. 

All photos, WVD, who is unaware of the length of her duration at Caddells.

Photos of her engine can be seen here.

We’re past mid-November, which has upped the urgency in thinking about a 2021 calendar, to do one or not.  And that made me decide to revisit the photos that morning that I took the November photo for  this year.  Houston Star came in with two Moran tugboats. 

Any ideas where Houston Star might be today?

Ice bow?

Guess what the Atlas logo is?  See here.

What was interesting the morning I took the Houston Star photo was that just 15 minutes behind her was another tanker,

Yasa Flamingo.  She’s currently off Salinas, Portugal.  Houston Star is now off Port Aransas, off Corpus Christi.

 

All photos, WVD, who’s receptive to your ideas about the inclusions on a possible 2021 calendar.

Some harbors are more varied than others.  I’m happy to call the sixth boro home for now. 

I’d never expect to see Emma Miller come in from “sea” or even in through the Narrows.

The weather is quite variable as well.  In a singularly unpleasant day, MSC Alicante

Ziyou ( a Tayana 37??), and

a Kadey-Krogen Evening Light (not the tugboat) all head out to sea.

A day or two later, warm morning light bathes Dorothy J

as she brings Weeks 536 into the boro.

It’s not winter yet, but there’s a lot of fishing going on with all manner of goals.

Shearwater is running a lot of line, but of course her quarry is

not the finny type.  Rather, she’s generating bathymetric images. I guess I’m not privvy to them, not being the client.  You can see her track lines on AIS. Sharp, another research vessel, is running the same lines from Sandy Hook south.  Has anyone gotten a photo of her?

This I’d wager is a fleet angling for bluefish or stripers or more.  Tanker Maya pushes the finny ones in their direction as she makes for sea.

 

Osprey herd the finny ones from just above the VZ.

Fugro Explorer comes in from sea for supplies, fuel, and who knows what more.

 

 

All photos and sentiments, WVD, who asserts that no one can ever be bored along the margins of the sixth boro.

A few of you have written to ask that I again upload photos of larger size so that when you double-click on a photo, they enlarge.  Here’s the problem:  Facebook won’t allow me to upload at that size if I want a photo on the preview.  Since a lot of folks just read on FB, my compromise has been to upload smaller photos.    

Bobbie Ann departs the sixth boro with some GLDD equipment. 

Little did I know at the time that Bobbie Ann had left the sixth boro a decade ago, then as Vera K.

Ernest Campbell wrestles along a double hull bunker barge. I wonder why the Centerline Logistics lion has not yet been added to her stack.

When tugs like Mary Turecamo assist a deeply laden tanker, the perspective from the upper wheelhouse is so much different than when assisting a ULCV, with their much higher freeboard.

Sometimes the 46′ x 15′ Rae is just the right size.  Recall Rae‘s role in getting Wavertree back into her berth after the big renovation?

One of the newest tugboats in the boro, Cape Canaveral, 105′ x 36′ and generating 5000 hp, has the most evocative name.

She has two siblings, Cape Henry and Cape Lookout.

Again, is it me?  I don’t believe I’ve seen Justine in a long while. She’s also 105′ x 35′ and 4000 hp.  She has an elevating wheelhouse, which you can see here, scroll.

This is crowded:  (l to r) Diane B, Saint Emilion, Meredith C. Reinauer, Lois Ann L.  Moran, and Pathfinder.

 

Escorting from a distance astern, it’s Kimberly.

And finally, a photo from some time back, Vane’s New York, now working on the Great Lakes, Vane’s only freshwater unit . . .  that I know of.

All photos, WVD.

A year and a half ago, I saw a small craft that I’d first misidentified.   No, of course it was not Atlantic Enterprise or 

Witte 4004, shown here

returning from the dump on a rainy morning.

But right outside the Staten Island side of the VZ Bridge, this small craft, the RIB, showed up, and again I wondered if it was the NY Media Boat Defender, which led me to wonder why

they moved in so close to the wire trailing from 

Atlantic Enterprise.

By now, even with naked eye,  I’d spotted the blue logo on the sliding door of the RIB.  It was a crew 

addition on the fly.

It’s a maneuver that used to make me queasy, just because I never got that good at it.

Well done.  Transfer complete, Enterprise throttles up.

They spin around, take the stern of 4004, and head back to the base.

All photos, WVD.

Here are previous iterations, just to change things up.  Non-random here means I took these over a few weeks, which should be obvious as you look through the photos.

Atlantic Enterprise . .  . she’s big at 136′ x 40′.  Over the past few years, she has appeared here.  Before that, she was in the sixth boro but much less active as Barents Sea. She had different names before Barents going back to 1976.

Although slightly older than Atlantic Salvor, the two boats appear to be mostly similar. An Atlantic Salvor tow I’ll always remember relates to the WTC antenna here.

Some companies have a crew boat.  Behold Matthew Scott, a 1968 Gulf Craft 65′ x 16′.

When I first saw Caitlin Ann, she was called Vivian L. Roehrig.

The 79′ x 24′ tug keeps busy.

Hidden behind this barge,

it’s Sarah Ann, who i first knew as June K

I did a post on Brian Nicholas some years back.  I don’t recall ever seeing her as Banda Sea, but in this post from June 2009, that name was still showing . . . .

My favorite photo of Paul Andrew over the years

is this one, showing the 64′ x 23′ tugboat getting transferred, so to speak.

Mary Alice is one of the larger DonJon boats, at 92′ x 27′.

We’ll end with another shot of Atlantic Enterprise, distinguishable from Salvor   (my photo during the tugboat race September 5, 2010)

by that fire monitor.

Other DonJon boats– Meagan Ann, Emily Ann, Rebecca Ann, Thomas D., who else  did I miss–I’ve not seen so far in fall 2020.

All photos, WVD.

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