You are currently browsing the monthly archive for July 2020.

Since we’re at models, recall this post from two years ago with photos of a diorama in France depicting the sixth boro with a model of a Moran tugboat, the Statue, and a liner.

These photos come from Steve Munoz, who tells this story: “model schooner Evelyn, about 3 feet long, built in early 1900s by a merchant seaman from Maine, Bill Kunze.  The hull is of a hard black rubber-like material and sails made at Ratsey‘s on City Island.  Bill sometimes lived with my grandparents in Brooklyn. The model is named after my grandmother Evelyn Mae.”

“Here the boat in Lake Champlain off Velez Marine in Port Henry NY with my father and I chasing it in a motorboat. The deck gear allowed the sails to be set depending on the strength of the wind.  The year is 1962.”  So this is not an RC controlled boat.  As an aside, I love the lines on that nearest white-hulled cruiser.

“Around 1930 Bill would take my father (who was the general manager of Tickle Engineering when it closed) and his brother (who was the tug captain and pilot for Dalzell and McAllister) on a motor boat in Jamaica Bay and to sail the schooner Evelyn for a sail. Once, Evelyn boat headed for a tug towing several barges and at every gap between the barges it sailed faster toward the tow. Thankfully the sailboat survived.”

“Today Evelyn is in my home residing on a china closet in foyer. The sails are disintegrating and are very fragile.

As to Bill, the model maker, “He would stay in Brooklyn with my grandparents when he was not at sea in the 1930s. Apparently his family owned a number of merchant sailing ships until President FDR passed some law that essentially putting cargo sailing ships out of business. Bill was not very fond of the president after that, but in retrospect the law probably more prepared the US for WW II. One day in the early 1940s he told my grandmother that he was going to the store and never returned. It was assumed by my grandparents that he was seriously ill and committed suicide. I have his personal and ID information and his cedar sea chest here, dating around 1900. I also have pics of him with my father and uncle as boys. ”

Many thanks to Steve for these photos and stories.

Sailing ships in bottles . .  . here are a few by Alex Bellinger.

I’ve heard them called “patience bottles” and “impossible bottles.”

But how many of these have you seen, tugs in bottles?

Alex, whom I’ve know for 30 years, writes:  “the tugs are for my  older brother, who worked on tugs out of New Orleans along the river and through the Gulf for many years, until he grew tired of them and wanted more deep water work so spent a number of years on LNG tankers in the Sea of Japan and Malaysia.  He finished his career at sea on cable laying ships.”

I made the attached model of a tug for him many years ago, and another soon after, which I sold.  A little more recently I made the small tug with a schooner, inspired by Gordon Grant’s watercolor, “Bon Voyage”.  That’s about the extent of my tug in bottle work, done more fun than serious work.”

Another friend, Frank Hanavan, rigs tall ships as well as ships in bottles.

So how do they get in there, and what are all these strings?

 

Let’s go back to Alex’s work, and I summarize his explanation here: This is a model of Ingomar, built 1904 in Essex MA and wrecked in fog on a beach nearby in 1936.  By the time she was known as “queen of the halibut fishery,” in 1923 her crew received a record premium of $400 (in 1923!)  for their catch.

The scale is 1: 228. The model measures 6 inches from the waterline to the mast top and is 8.2 inches long.   The hull is made of pine. The deck planks, bulwark, railing and deck equipment are made of the same. Masts, yards, spars and the capstan drum are made of bamboo. Parts of the deck equipment were made from index card paper, as were the dories.

When the wooden parts were finished, the deck was stained, the masts, rails and the spill with a slightly darker stain. All surfaces that are painted are embedded with acrylic primer. After painting, grooves were carved to represent planking. The parts of the deck equipment were made from index card paper, as were the dories. Load hatches and the deckhouse rails are made of pear wood.

The mast rings were made from a copper strand of an ordinary extension cord, wrapped around a pin about the mast diameter, and cut into rings with fine nail scissors.  Parts of the deck equipment were made from index card paper, as were the dories.

In total there were 35 threads to raise parts of the rigging one it was nested inside the bottle.

The model was nested in on a Saturday and finished the following Friday. The white wire is part of a coat hanger that holds the model in place while I sort the threads and carefully tension them. The wire is fixed outside the bottle with a duct tape.

Many thanks to Alex and Frank for sharing these photos.

For some exceptional ship bottles, check this translated article.

And finally, from Frank, it’s two of his ship models, one in a bottle, all in one painting.  More Frank photos here and here.

For an entirely different form of ship’s models, these in cases, there’s a must-see museum in Savannah GA.  I visited it here.

 

Launched in 1973 as Amy Moran, she has spent 47 years by that name . . . .

her 3400hp responding to that name,

right up until now.

New paint jobs

and new locations . . .

meet John Joseph.

I suspect she’ll be heading out of town soon, and receiving more paint. AIS already shows her as John Joseph.

John Joseph photos thanks to an anonymous mariner.  Photos of Amy Moran by WVD.

For the previous 27 boats featured in this series, click here.

That big “300” is beckoning, so although I had other posts planned . . .  let’s increment closer to that 300.  I’m inviting your participation here so that i can make it the best “non-random” random post.  Random Tugs 001 was here. Random Tugs 100 was more than seven years later, and 200 was about four years after that.

What better way to start than with these two photos of W. O. Decker, taken yesterday by Glenn Raymo.  Yes, that’s the Walkway over the Hudson.  Decker is taking a freshwater cure.

Many previous posts featuring Decker can be seen here.

Kimberly Turecamo assisted an MSC box boat in recently.  A less dynamic photo of Kimberly appeared yesterday.  The founder of MSC, Gianluigi Aponte, is alive and well in Italy.

Sarah D was on this blog recently with a unique tow; usually she pushes vessels like this.   But hey . . . it pays the bills.

Andrea follows a box ship to the NJ portions of the sixth boro.

Reaching back into the archives a bit, here was Honcho in San Juan PR.  I took this photo in March 2013.  She’s been all around.  I’ve forgotten, though, whether she actually worked on the Great Lakes.   I need to find out also what she looks like now that she’s a Moran boat.

Back in April 2012, I caught Bruce A. McAllister bringing in Mars, marked as registered in San Francisco.  Mars went onto a heavy lift ship over to Nigeria.  The photo makes me curious about traveling to Mars.

See the tugboat here?  Name the bridge in the background?

Between Algoma Olympic and CSL Laurentian, it’s Leo A. McArthur, built in Penglai China in 2009. Believe it or not, Penglai was the birthplace and boyhood home of Henry Luce, the magazine guy!

Did you recognize the last two photos as the Detroit River, and the bend between Detroit and Windsor.  The reason I asked about the bridge . . . the Ambassador Bridge is that the owner died yesterday.    Manuel “Matty” Maroun was 93. The 1929-built bridge, as well as the duty-free stores in its vicinity, have been owned by Maroun since 1979.

Many thanks to Glenn for use of the Decker photos.  All others by WVD.

 

 

The sixth boro, like any location, offers infinite perspectives, compounded by equally countless nuance of season, hour, weather, and activity variation.  This view of Kimberly in the stalls at Caddells the other day differs considerably from the dynamic ones of the past 18 months.

Kust a few days different but quite different location and atmospherics . . .  Weddell Sea came into the Narrows the other day as we began feeling the effects of Fay.   She had Penn No. 90 on a wire.

Further to the west in another spot, Discovery Coast was on the outside, mostly blocking Brooklyn, who’s been in here for a few months already.

In clear weather, land would be visible beyond the tug, but Fay changed that for a while.

Dace Reinauer was high and dry in Dry Dock No. 7.

 

And finally, just west of Dry Dock No. 7, stacked up were at least seven Bouchard boats, sadly waiting.

All photos, WVD, who’s starting to think about random tugs three hundred.  If you have a photo of a tug never depicted on this blog, send it along. The big three hundred COULD be all never-here-before tugboats.

White, blue, and red comes in different contexts, and

this one along with the name on the trailboard does give pause.

Glenn Raymo took these photos in Poughkeepsie Sunday, and they were my introduction to an ambitious sailing project.   The best I can tell this project began in Petrozavodsk, a city on the western shore of Lake Onega, in northwest Russia, a few hundred miles east of access to the Baltic at St. Petersburg.  Lake Onega is connected to both the Baltic and the Arctic Ocean via the White Sea Canal. As a person who fancies himself somewhat well-versed in canals, I was ignorant of the White Sea Canal until now:  mostly hand-dug by prisoners of the USSR in the 1930s

Pilgrim is a lodya, a traditional sailing vessel of this area.  Along with the koch, the lodya is an ancient Rusian polar exploration vessel.

If you follow along on the “news” link, you see their step-by-step voyage from Russia.  Exactly two years ago, eg, they had just crossed the Bay of Biscay!   News articles go all the way back to 2006.

To my friends along the Erie Canal, once the waterway is open, keep your eyes peeled.

Many thanks to Glenn Raymo for this catch.  Previous posts with attribution to him can be seen here.

It reminds me of all the memorable vessels that have transited the Erie Canal:  Bounty*, Draken Harold Fairhair, Pinta, Sequoia**,  Hokule’a, Ra, When and If, Amarah Zee, the future Oliver Hazard Perry, Lois McClure . . . I have no doubt left some out.

*I have photos but I’ve not posted them on tugster.   **One of the planned but not realized posted is a review of Capt. Giles M. Kelly‘s book;  any volunteer to write a review?  You’ll get a free book.

And to the crew of Pilgrim,    попутный ветер, друзья мои      I hope I spelled that right.

I’ve been social distancing in Queens, but this didn’t prevent me from telecomexchanging the news with my sister.  She took these photos and told me about her experiences sailing in the Sea of Cortez.   You can click on the link to the article at the end of this post.

I hope to get to the Sea some day;  parts of it are designed a UNESCO World heritage site.

 

 

Isla del Carmen is a refuge for bighorn sheep whose future was threatened in mainland areas of Baja California.

The plethora of wildlife notwithstanding, the gist of the article was . . . the Sea for people in the time of COVID.  That is the link to the article.  I’d been arranging to get to Mexico a few months back, but it’s not going to happen for a while.

All photos, John and Lucy Knape.

For more of their photos, click here.

I counted a dozen wind farm and other offshore construction project-related vessels in a triangle defined by NYC, Nantucket, and Atlantic City.  These are vessels of a sort not previously seen here, or rarely seen here.   Two of them came in through the Narrows yesterday just in front of the 2020 tropical storm Fay.  The name “Fay” was also used for a deadlier storm in 2008.

The first was  Royal, a DP2 platform supply vessel.  She’s a Jones Act workboat, 2004-launched in Mobile AL by Bender Shipbuilding.

The 252′ x 54′ vessel has accommodations for 22 crew.

I don’t know what she’s been doing in the several months she’s been in the triangle, but prior to coming in yesterday, she’d remained in an area outside the Ambrose seabuoy for the better part of a week.

 

She’s part of the huge Tidewater fleet, which includes Highland Eagle as well, which is also in the triangle now.

Following Royal was Fugro Brasilis, non-Jones Act.

She’s 219′ x 46′ and has accommodations for 42.

She’s been off Atlantic City for over a month, but this is my first time to see her in the sixth boro.

Fugro is a Dutch multinational, operating in 61 countries.  I’ve mentioned before here that “fugro” is an acronym for “Funderingstechniek en Grondmechanica, Dutch, translated to “Engineering Company for Foundation Technology and Soil Mechanics,”  which would make a much less-pronounceable acronym.

Note the rain here?

I mentioned above that over a dozen vessels of this sort are in the triangle.  I’d love to see them all at some point, but most intriguing three for me are Deep Helder*, GoLiberty, and Aqueos Splash.

* “helder” is Dutch for “bright.”

All photos, WVD.

The other vessels in the triangle are Kommandor Susan, Kommandor Iona, Horizon Geology, Fugro Explorer, Fugro Searcher, Commander, Ocean Observer, Ocean Endeavour (now in Elizabethport).  If anyone has taken photos of any of these vessels recently in the triangle, I’d love to see them.

 

What’s visible for now is Pegasus and Maersk Seletar, but behind the container ship and soon to emerge

is Mukaddes Kalkavan.  A few hours later, I saw Seletar doing 22 kts heading south along the Jersey coast.  Seletar is an area in Singapore.

Ava escorts Mukaddes Kalkavan into the port from the starboard bow.

Scot Munchen is a relatively small tanker ( 383′ x 59′) with an unusual superstructure design. Here‘s the fleet of this Istanbul-based company, all incorporating the same stack design.

 

Here’s a photo from about 0500, Ava is assisting Hyundai Smart into Bayonne.  The name Hyundai Smart connotes automotive to me.

 

Ever Liberal heads out to sea.

with Jonathan Moran assisting past the Bouchard flock.

And finally, this is the Laura Maersk that back already a month ago was towed into the sixth boro as a fully loaded dead ship due to an engine explosion.

Light in the water, this container ship shows a different profile.

All photos, WVD.

Blessings of summer heat, if you don’t have to work out in it, are best relished right after dawn, or from the shade.  I chose the first option here as Barney Turecamo, made up to Georgia,

gets an assist in rotating from Turecamo Girls.

Once pointed, a burst of power from its 5100hp EMDs commits the ATB to its course.

Foxy3, with its bright trim ribbons gleaming in the dawn, is off to the job.

Doubleskin 57 arrives from somewhere in the Kills and Elk River

waits to assist Wye River

 

in placing it alongside the dock gently.

Marjorie B is off to some work, followed by and Poling & Cutler and Vane units.

The P & C unit was Kristin Poling pushing Eva Leigh Cutler.

On another day, Mister T was arriving from outside the Narrows

just as the sun cleared Bay Ridge.

And yet another day and different place, Curtis Reinauer waited alongside RTC 82 during cargo transfer.

 

All photos, WVD.

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