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I’ll let George speak here, starting in the Bay area:  “One real treat was University of Alaska’s research vessel Sikuliaq. She’s an NSF vessel, operated by Alaska, but was down here to fill in while the delivery of Sally Ride AGOR-28 was delayed, and perhaps is working for Scripps again. These were the best shots I’ve ever had of her.”  A bit more on Sikuliaq:  she was built on the Great Lakes at Marinette WI; that was a long delivery. Click here for a rendering, showing her ice-breaking hull.

photo by George Schneider in May 2019

At Half Moon Bay, George writes:  “Caleb, IMO 899162 is neglected state, but certainly not fatal if anybody takes an interest in her.  Unfortunately, she fits the description of vessels the governments are finding reasons to eliminate before they sink, so she might not be around long.  I understand she’s been “ousted” from the harbor several times, now permanently. She was originally the Navy harbor tug Panameta, YT 402.  She was reported sunk as a target on 4 Sept 1977, but in 1978 she went up for sale.  Western Tug Company picked her up and renamed her Ocean Mariner.  I have an opinion that she operated in that time under the name Cindy B.  By 1992 she was Caleb for Salmon Bay Barge Lines, who operated her through 2004 as a tug, before she became the classic floating dream for someone.”  And that  may explain her current sorry state.

“Western Tug Company picked her up and renamed herOcean Mariner.I have an opinion that she operated in that time under the name Cindy B.  By 1992 she was Caleb for Salmon Bay Barge Lines, who operated her through 2004 as a tug, before she became the classic floating dream for someone.”  And that  may explain her current sorry state.

“Robert Gray has been renamed in the past two months.  She’s now named Sacajawea.  Although built as Robert Gray, this isn’t her first name change.  During WWII she served in the Army as LT 666.”  [That means she is 110′ loa,   built in Lake Washington SY Seattle in 1936.  LT 653, the preceding hull number, is Bloxom.]  “In the 1950’s she became Don J Miller II  for the U. S. Geologic Survey.”

“At the time of the photo below,  she was documented as Robert Gray, and classed as a research vessel.  She is now classed as passenger vessel Sacajawea, so I imagine the hope is to use her as a charter yacht, although there’s quite a trend towards stationary B&B’s on old classy vessels.  Her home port has been changed from Portland to Seattle.  That renaming is an interesting one; the captain Robert Gray is credited with finding the mouth of the Columbia River, while one might wonder if the guide Sacajawea knew about it all along.”

Over in Contra Costa, “The noble old Burton tug Pomaika’i has worked for Gulf, East, and West Coast owners first as El Zorro Grande, Helen J. Turecamo, and Manfred Nystrom.   Greger is showing his pride in his fleet by having the new name welded onto the hull.”

“In April 2019, I photographed a 70-foot Army Post-war ST, the former ST 2112. She’s previously sailed as Rachelle Brusco and Erica S, both of which names can still be seen on her. Now she’s named Pacific Pilot, and hasn’t yet received the loving care that Greger obviously puts into his vessels.”

And finally, we head to San Diego:  “Down in South Bay, Normand Reach was at a better pier for photos. What a monster she is! At 121 meters in length, she’s as big as the drilling rigs I cut my teeth on. Back then, the biggest support craft weren’t half that length, and of course, about 1/10 the tonnage.”

photo by George Schneider March 2019

A big thank you to George for use of these photos from California.  I have many,many more.

 

 

 

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