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I’d been watching No.11Asomaru for a few days, wondering what the story was.  It appeared to coexist with containership MOL Courage, the green symbol surrounding the smaller gray one.  It did this screen grab Friday morning . . . yesterday.  When I saw there was a Asomaru No.8  and it was a tugboat, I thought possibly there’d be a tugboat riding on the containers, and I made excuses to avoid work and zoomed out to the Narrows.

There I saw MOL Courage anchored, an unusual spot for a container ship.

Several Moran tugs were standing by with it.

When the MOL vessel headed in, I leaped into motion and followed it, hoping to catch a glance of the Japanese tug.

 

But I saw nothing, except containers.

Later in the day, I checked on MOL Courage in Port Elizabeth, and sure enough, the

gray icon for No.11Asomaru is still there.

Can anyone explain this signal?  I saw a similar signal once before last fall . . . supposedly an unspecified vessel on a container ship, also in Port Elizabeth.

I’m puzzled.

Dd you catch my reference to leaping into motion . . .   Sorry . . . I couldn’t pass up that opportunity, given today’s date.  Previous leap days’ posts are here and here and here.

All photos, captures, leaping imagination here, WVD.

 

We’ve seen this before with entire fleets, as in the Kirbyfication . . . and Blueing . . . almost exactly a decade ago.

So check out St. Andrews now compared with then. Harley Marine Service, aka HMS, for a few weeks now has become Centerline Logistics Corporation, hence the orange stripe.

Andrea has gotten the new livery, including the lion on the stack.

Of the two boats that arrived here from Alaska not quite two years ago, Ernest Campbell has had the “centerline stripe” added,but not

the stack lion.

And C. F. Campbell has not been touched at all . . . as of this morning.

All photos by WVD.

 

Name the shipping line?

Ships are color-coded after all . . .  all ships of this line are the same color as this one being escorted in by Jonathan C and Miriam Moran.

More and

more clues are here.

Lenient is surely not the first vessels of Evergreen that I’ve watched transit the port waterways., although

it’s the first I’ve seen loaded–or unloaded–in this zoned manner.

 

 

All photos today by WVD, who took these photos a few weeks ago.

More “thanks to” posts already planned, but if you have some relevant photos to share, I’d love to receive them.

 

I’ll let George speak here, starting in the Bay area:  “One real treat was University of Alaska’s research vessel Sikuliaq. She’s an NSF vessel, operated by Alaska, but was down here to fill in while the delivery of Sally Ride AGOR-28 was delayed, and perhaps is working for Scripps again. These were the best shots I’ve ever had of her.”  A bit more on Sikuliaq:  she was built on the Great Lakes at Marinette WI; that was a long delivery. Click here for a rendering, showing her ice-breaking hull.

photo by George Schneider in May 2019

At Half Moon Bay, George writes:  “Caleb, IMO 899162 is neglected state, but certainly not fatal if anybody takes an interest in her.  Unfortunately, she fits the description of vessels the governments are finding reasons to eliminate before they sink, so she might not be around long.  I understand she’s been “ousted” from the harbor several times, now permanently. She was originally the Navy harbor tug Panameta, YT 402.  She was reported sunk as a target on 4 Sept 1977, but in 1978 she went up for sale.  Western Tug Company picked her up and renamed her Ocean Mariner.  I have an opinion that she operated in that time under the name Cindy B.  By 1992 she was Caleb for Salmon Bay Barge Lines, who operated her through 2004 as a tug, before she became the classic floating dream for someone.”  And that  may explain her current sorry state.

“Western Tug Company picked her up and renamed herOcean Mariner.I have an opinion that she operated in that time under the name Cindy B.  By 1992 she was Caleb for Salmon Bay Barge Lines, who operated her through 2004 as a tug, before she became the classic floating dream for someone.”  And that  may explain her current sorry state.

“Robert Gray has been renamed in the past two months.  She’s now named Sacajawea.  Although built as Robert Gray, this isn’t her first name change.  During WWII she served in the Army as LT 666.”  [That means she is 110′ loa,   built in Lake Washington SY Seattle in 1936.  LT 653, the preceding hull number, is Bloxom.]  “In the 1950’s she became Don J Miller II  for the U. S. Geologic Survey.”

“At the time of the photo below,  she was documented as Robert Gray, and classed as a research vessel.  She is now classed as passenger vessel Sacajawea, so I imagine the hope is to use her as a charter yacht, although there’s quite a trend towards stationary B&B’s on old classy vessels.  Her home port has been changed from Portland to Seattle.  That renaming is an interesting one; the captain Robert Gray is credited with finding the mouth of the Columbia River, while one might wonder if the guide Sacajawea knew about it all along.”

Over in Contra Costa, “The noble old Burton tug Pomaika’i has worked for Gulf, East, and West Coast owners first as El Zorro Grande, Helen J. Turecamo, and Manfred Nystrom.   Greger is showing his pride in his fleet by having the new name welded onto the hull.”

“In April 2019, I photographed a 70-foot Army Post-war ST, the former ST 2112. She’s previously sailed as Rachelle Brusco and Erica S, both of which names can still be seen on her. Now she’s named Pacific Pilot, and hasn’t yet received the loving care that Greger obviously puts into his vessels.”

And finally, we head to San Diego:  “Down in South Bay, Normand Reach was at a better pier for photos. What a monster she is! At 121 meters in length, she’s as big as the drilling rigs I cut my teeth on. Back then, the biggest support craft weren’t half that length, and of course, about 1/10 the tonnage.”

photo by George Schneider March 2019

A big thank you to George for use of these photos from California.  I have many,many more.

 

 

 

George sends me lots of photos of ports I’ve not yet visited, and they’re convincing me to expand my horizons and see some new places. More on that later.

Let’s start in San Diego with Bernardine C, aka Bernie, a unique push boat that Curtin Marine built at their own facility in Long Beach, and her certificates show her as “Hull #1”.  She was completed in 2015.  Note her winch protected under her wheelhouse.  She’s registered at 45′ x 22′ x 5′, and powered by two John Deere Tier-3 engines, rated at 1000 HP.  Full information on her and other Curtin vessels can be found here.

Next tug along is Contender, belonging to Pacific Tug Boat.  She’s a 62′ x 28′ x 8′, built in 1964 (or 69 ?) at some yard in Long Beach, possibly Jones Tug & Barge, and is rated at 1200 HP.  George writes:  “In her previous life, as Rebel II, she and a similar boat, Tuffy II (now Tommy?), took deck barges to resupply Catalina Island on a twice-daily basis. I never knew them to miss a trip due to rough weather.  When another operator took over that franchise in 2016, both tugs were picked up by Pacific Tug Boat.”

Now for some boats George reported on from the Bay area, let’s start with Raccoon, a USACE debris collector that shows a slight resemblance to her origins as a Navy Seaplane Wrecking Derrick.  George:  “Where there were zones for seaplanes to take off and land, there was a need to get the wreckage of one out of the way quickly if one crashed, so those in the air could land before they ran out of fuel. These vessels, called YSDs, or “Mary Anne’s”,  were self-propelled crane vessels to fulfill that need.  To see an example of a YSD with an aircraft on its foredeck, click here.”

Of interest, Raccoon has an updated crane and burns a quite innovative fuel made of soybeans.

Here an image of YSD-64 in the Caroline Islands taken on 5 March 1945.  On her deck is an Avenger.  Click here for another Avenger.

Let’s end with Phyllis T, one of three 50-foot steel push boats built by Inland Boat Co. of Orange Texas in 2001 commissioned by Tudor-Saliba Construction Company for the retrofitting of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge.  She is operated by Dutra Dredging and still in use.

Many thanks to George for use of these photos from California.

 

Foggy day, moody port.  Without the icon off to the left, you might think it’s just an uninhabited island with a law enforcement boat approaching in our wake, but

once you see the logo on the cowl . . . along with the statue above . . .

suddenly the land edges lapped by the waters must be teeming with life. The sixth boro is the least inhabited one.

All photos by WVD, who’s amazed by the mild February weather.

 

You have to be in the right place at the right time to get radiant photos like these, and what better place to witness the colors in sky and on water than from a boat.

Newark Bay with its calm waters and its sculptural industry . . .  I don’t mean to get carried away here, this is the perfect place and time to get these photos.

Some tugboats follow a container ship to the docks in this twilight . . . that’s what it is, but I squint a bit, let the caffeine do its work, and I see future vehicles descending with retrorockets firing.

Or maybe you see something else, just what it is . . . commerce on the waters.  No matter . . . these are beautiful photos.  Not all days are this beautiful, and not all beautiful days allow for even momentary admiration of scenes like this.  And who can tell that millions of folks live within a 10-mile radius of this spot

Many thanks to Skip for sharing these photos and letting me post them here.

 

Seen in and around the sixth boro in the past weeks . . .  is this batch, starting with BBC Germany, heading up the North River.

Kitikmeot W had Dory alongside,

She was previously . . . Icdas 09.

Genava, homeported in the impossible saltwater port of Basel and formerly Tsuneishi Zhoushan Ss 180, discharges Chilean salt.

Maritime Kelly Anne preps for departure.

Parallel to the previous shot lies FPMC 24, with Lesney Byrd providing lubrication oils.   Without looking it up, what do you suppose FPMC expands to?

Sten Odin has to be the newest vessel in today’s set.

 

And finally, in the anchorage near the VZ Bridge, it’s Ladon and Chemneon.

All photos by WVD.

And FPMC . . . is Formosa Plastics Marine Corporation, based here.  I never saw that coming.

A friend who works on the Great Lakes sent me these next two photos recently.  When I saw Anglian Lady in the foreground, my first thought was that I’d seen her myself but she looked somehow different.  More on that later.

Anglian Lady was Thornycraft built and launched in Southampton UK as Hamtun, a 132′ x 31′ steam tug that operated for the company now known as Red Funnel. From there, it was sold to interests in Belgium and then back in England before being purchased by Purvis Marine of Sault Ste. Marie.

But the tugboat I recalled was not Anglian Lady.  It was another distinctive tug by Purvis Marine below.

I was thrilled back in September 2017 when I got out in front of it here.  Location?  Some clues are the structures beyond the bow and the stern of this tug.

Avenger IV is the tug I recalled.  She’s from Cochrane 1962, a former steam tug, 120′ x 30′.

The location?  This is a dozen miles east of the Mackinac Bridge.

The PML website can be found here.

Many thanks to the Great Lakes mariner for the first two photos and for getting me to have a second look at Purvis Marine.

And the G-tugs in the background of the top photo likely include Minnesota and North Dakota.

 

Quick post today . . . If you ask me what has been the biggest surprise since I moved to NYC, discovered the sixth boro’s delights, and began tracking its flora, fauna, and mechanica, I’d say the the orange juice ships.

Orange Sun came off the ways in 2007, and has called in the sixth boro many times.

From my observer’s vantage point, she’s as immaculate as a well-used ship can be.

Even the assist boats keep a white canvas (?) between the rubber rendering and the light-colored hull.

Is that mismatched touch-up paint?

A recent foggy day enhanced the appearance of her buttery color scheme.

It’s fair to say that since seeing my first OJ tanker, my consumption of the juice has increased.  To be fair, I use the word “butter” to describe hull color, but my consumption of butter has not increased.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders why these vessels are managed from Lake Geneva in Switzerland.

 

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