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Tech astounds me . . . yesterday morning I got an email from a New Yorker in the UK telling about this event;  tugs are already under way, he said.

I missed the first tug but arrived in time for Liz Vinik, shown here in classic NY context as well as state-of-the-art architecture.

Following Liz was Vinik No. 6., another classic, one I’d not seen in a while.

Both veteran tugs were on the move.

 

Five hours later, and after both my VHF and cell phone had died, leaving me to wait on sheer faith that this was going to happen, the tow appeared into my field of view, westbound at Hell Gate.

TS Empire State IV VI was headed for the yard in dead ship mode.

 

With Liz on the bow and No. 6 alongside, they made their way to the Brooklyn Navy Yard, to GMD, where she would make her way into the graving dock after dark yesterday.

Nicholas tended the stern. Previously she was Maria J. 

 

Had she come around the bend by Hell Gate 15 minutes later, i would have missed this, since I had late afternoon chores waiting.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to Steve Munoz for that early morning email from the UK.

 

Melville explains Ishmael’s signing onto the whaling ship as related to that damp, drizzly November in [Ishmael’s] soul, but this series shows that a windy, dark October can trigger running away too.  I’m thrilled that today’s forecast calls for sunshine, and some reason for optimism.  Here are previous weather posts.

A few days ago we arrived in the sixth boro under clouds swept along by winds.

Someone who’s not been along Manhattan for a few decades would not recognize the city.

Rebecca Ann assists a scrap scow alongside Nordic Barents, a bulker I saw on the Saint Lawrence discharging ore less than month ago.

 

Joyce D.  is likely over to assist James.

DAT’s Dong-A Metis and Humen Bridge transfer cargoes in Bayonne. DA

T (Dong-A-Tanker) seems an odd name for a PCTC RORO.

A container ship, rusty from the oceans, passes the salt pile over along Richmond Terrace.

RTC 145 moves out of the Kills

with all the horsepower supplied by Christian.

All photos last week by Will Van Dorp, who’s now heading out to enjoy the sunshine.

 

xx

Here was “7” and 1 through 6.

This post will run photos from twilight to twilight…

Above and below, prosaically Service Boat No. 1 is doing pilot exchange duty.  She’s not large or particularly powerful or new, but in twilight before dawn she looked and sounded formidable.

Ocean Basques, here approaching the Laviolette Bridge, is a solid 200 miles upstream of the islands with the same namesake.

Ocean Basques was built in Collingwood ON, as was Ocean Sept-Isles.

Quite unique and speedy, Ocean Catatug 1 raced downstream.

As afternoon falls, Ocean Bertrand Jeansonne follows Ocean Henry Bain out of the homeport basin.

That’s the marine traffic control tower on the other side in Levis QC.

Returning to another twilight shot, here’s Ocean Henry Bain pushing a deep barge down bound.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

When Sea Coast towed a barge through the boro the other day, Tony A snapped the next two photos and shared them with me.  And I’m very grateful he did.

You recognize the cargo on this deck barge?  That’s Kings Point in the background.

And from Norman Brouwer, here are some closer up shots he took in New London CT.

The boat dates from 1925, it’s on its way to French & Webb to be restored, and  . . .

 

. . . see the real seal . . . that used to be the presidential yacht.  There’s some interesting info about the boat in the link in the previous sentence.  It was the “floating White House” of a simpler time, and even POTUS 39 regrets having sold it out of the government as an attempt to downsize US executive regality.

Many thanks to Tony and Norman for use of their photos.

For some other Mathis-built boats previously appearing on this blog, click here.

 

 

Yesterday was a day to hold onto to your hat . . . or tighten the straps.

Ruby M splashed in toward the Kills, where Maersk Vilnius was exiting, but it was the yawl Mah Jong

that appeared to thrive in these conditions, passing Corpus Christi‘s stern.

Meanwhile Caitlin Ann delivered the netted paper to the recyclers.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who stood at a diagonal into the wind while snapping these shots of the sixth boro.

Here–for the most part–are previous winds and windy posts.

Life gets lived in a linear fashion, but that’s not how it’s processed.  It seems the longer we live, the more chaotic we want processing to be.

Kirby and Margaret assisted this ship into the pier this morning.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’ll be processing regularly starting tomorrow, or so I hope.

 

Everlast has been a focus several times here before, so this post will add photos in exotic American Narrows landscapes to the record.

She has one of the more interesting service records among Great Lakes tugboats, IMHO.  See here. Then see how Russia and Greece play into her past here.

In the background here, you see Boldt Castle and

 

Sunken Rock Light, which would be better named “sunken ship” light.

All photo by Will Van Dorp, who will post again when able.

 

As mid-autumn displays her beauty at the approach to the Beauharnois Canal in the Seaway, my excitement spiked upon seeing MV Sinaa.

Sister ship to Nunalik, Sinaa was certain to be carrying specialized cargo delivery gear.  Here’s the rest of the NEAS fleet.  NEAS expands to Nunavut Eastern Arctic Shipping. For the difference between Nunavut and Nunavik, click here.  My first post with an NEAS vessel was here.

As we passed I saw I would not be disappointed.

The barges like Kangirsuk I and  II and the small tugs–I can’t quite make out the names. Anyone help?–are lowered into the waters near the Arctic destination so that they can shuttle cargo ashore.

Pangnirtung I and II make up the rest of the discharging equipment.

I’m hoping someone can help with the names of the small tugs and any additional info about them.  These NEAS tugs appeared previously on tugster here.   For a post I did on Inuit language, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who might be in a wifi dead zone the next few days.

 

Let’s start with a boat I’d imagined had to be fiberglass, but no . . .

it’s a wooden 1959 Century Coronado.

She’s got looks and speed.

Steaming in front of Bonnie Castle . . . that has to be a Steelcraft, like this one on the blog last year.

This one I saw only on a trailer . . .  but 224 mph!!!

And these . . .  they almost completely blocked the Erie Canal channel at Sylvan Beach.

And how’s this for two Corbin 39 pilothouse sailboats . . .

Does anyone have experience with this model?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is still gallivanting in foreign waters . . .

Now two more, one from me and another from an inquiring mind.

A above is mine, and B below is from Neil.  And the question is . . . are both these schooner rigs?

All photos except the last one by Will Van Dorp.

Some more eye candy today . . . Portofino . . . Italian made?

 

Miss St. Lawrence is a beauty.

Is there an echo in the blog software maybe  . . . ?

Elusive is a Hacker beauty based on a 1920s design, I believe.

Another Italian bella passes us, or maybe it’s the same one traveling at speeds not permitted in the lagoon.

Legend is a beauty.  There’s a definite echo.  Let me say “exquisite.”

To avoid the echo, I’ll call Rumrunner just plain elegant!

 

I hope you’ve had your fix of post-summer summer refined craft.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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