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Tagster 5 was posted exactly a year ago, so I’m taking that as license to revisit the series… today, when people put on masks.  Murals on buildings add color and design.  Whenever I have time to kill in a new or even familiar city, I wander around, getting exercise while at the same time looking for sights like these.  Guess the city?

See the purple squiggles along the right side of the photo below?

They led me to the far side of the building, where I saw this colossal image of a hometown icon.  Click on the photo to hear my favorite song from this depicted icon.

 

What language is Kraken anyhow?

 

Above and below . . . there’s dramatic range in the murals here.

 

Origin of “hula“?

If your residence is painted this way, do you need to attend to lawn or landscaping?

 

 

 

Guess the location?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who took these and many more during the course of an energetic several-mile stroll.

Art on ship’s propulsion?  I don’t mean props, but check out this followup to a post I did years ago . . .

 

 

She arrived in the harbor almost six years ago, just before the annual football event, and that’s why I called her that.  Speculation about a name change then from Left Coast Lifter had been rampant, but so far as I know, she has remained LCL.

Above, that’s the last photo I took of her by the TZ Bridge, with Hook Mountain in the background, and below, that’s where she now waits, likely to be down rigged.

I suppose speculation now will be her next destination.  Meanwhile she’ll be a part of the temporary landscape at Weeks, skyline, or crane forest, and she’ll be photographed, as I’ve done here here with MC-41 Snazzy Kitty,

Lady May, and

Thomas J. 

Check her out before she’s lowered for travel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Other large cranes I’ve posted include Paul Bunyan, Grasse River, Pelicano 1, and Herman the German.  Then there’s the Chesapeake 1000.

 

What the title means is something different than I had planned . . .  So watch this series of screen shots . . .  first at 0010 hrs today.

But then, look who picks it up, re-messages it, and it appears in their news feed!!  NBC, NYDailyNews, USNews . . .!!

Tri-CityHerald comes from Washington state, and then there’s the SFChronicle . . .

. . . the ReadingEagle . . .

So when I got up this morning and read notes messaged to me and then a sampling of news from commercial outlets–as evidenced above–I’m in a tizzy.

I recognize the ship as a serious attempt at reproducing a vessel of 500 years ago and calling it Nao Santa Maria.  So when I google Nao Santa Maria, I find they’ve been in town but their very own FB notice–I believe–says “first time in the US…”  I’m done!!

 

This leads me to the vessel’s “serious” page, rather than their FB hype, and for the second time (I’ll get to that) I read this:

The “Nao Santa María” is one of the most famous ships of mankind. On October 12th of 1492, led by Christopher Columbus, it played the main role on one of the most important historic landmarks: the discovery of America, the encounter between two worlds that changed the future of universal history.

On August 3rd of 1492 it sailed off from the port of Palos de la Frontera (Huelva, Spain) together with the caravels “Pinta” and “Niña”, the so called three caravels from which this nao was the flagship. In all references written by Columbus about the Santa María in his famous diary of the expedition, he refers to it as “nao”, as did other chroniclers of the time:

“Cristopher Columbus loaded, apart from those two, a nao… and on the third, being the nao bigger than the rest, he wanted to travel himself, and hence it became the flagship” 

It was acquired by the Spanish Crown to be part of Juan de la Cosa’s columbine expedition. Although De la Cosa was natural from the Spanish northern region of Cantabria and lived in the southern Puerto de Santa María, the general belief is that the vessel was built somewhere on the coast of Galicia, hence her previous name: La Gallega (The Galician) . . . .     

It goes on.  You can read it here. So, Nao Santa Maria (NSM) is one of the “most famous ships of mankind” by their own proclamation, and US history books would generally agree.  How many ships’ names did you know in –say–fifth grade?

But I go on with my rant.   On NSM’s “blog” section, and you’ll see here they say they begin their “tour along the US” here back in January 2019, and at that, they state they arrive in the US then from San juan PR . . . Is PR NOT in the US?   !@#@!!   And was their summer “tall ships parade” as far west as Green Bay WI not in the US?  Moreover, did NSM’s participation in the 2019 event ever get shared nationwide identifying them as a pirate ship?

In the world of “fake news” and “spin” and otherwise biased reportage, this surely seems like a cautionary tale.    This out-of-control story about NSM as a pirate ship reminds me of this old collecting feathers story.

I first encountered and posted about NSM in Ogdensburg NY here.

All “cut’n’paste” and sentiments are solely those of Will Van Dorp, who has previous made known my attitude toward pirates here.

If you think you’ll find a disabled pirate ship in the sixth boro tis morning, well, they’re nearly to Atlantic city by now, trying to outrun the travesty of reportage captured in google . . . or bury their loot?

 

 

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I could be wrong, but a raft of unusual vessels coming through the sixth boro recently is related to priorities set and now contracts signed by a NYS agency created in 1975 called NYSERDA.  Three organizations you’ll be hearing a lot from are Equinor Wind US, Ørsted A/S, and Eversource Energy, and their projects Empire Wind and Sunrise Wind.  Click here for a map of the target areas.

Geosea is one of these vessels.

She has accommodations for 70 crew, 

some of whom you see taking photos as they enter the Narrows.

 

As of this posting she’s in port in Elizabeth NJ.

 

Also in port this morning–and hence the rainy photo until I get a better one–it’s Regulus, a US-flagged platform supply vessel.

Here’s another, taken earlier from a slightly different angle.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s always welcoming of others’ photos, particularly now in relation to wind farm related developments in the sixth boro.

Click here for my series related to the already functioning offshore wind farm along the NE coast, Deepwater Wind.

It’s been a few months since number 265, so let’s catch up.

Kimberly Poling had brought product upriver via Noelle Cutler, and you can tell some time has passed since I took this photo by the foliage.

Edna A was assisting a crane barge working on the power lines near Hudson NY.

Challenger came in through the Narrows yesterday, delivering a crane barge.  A few years back she delivered what was initially a mystery cargo here.

Eli stood by as salt was transshipped from scow to large truck.

Mister T was westbound for the Upper Bay with four scow to be filled.

Pokomoke brought petroleum upriver.

Memory Motel, the original exotic,  . . . I wondered where she had gone until I saw her high and dry up by Scarano.

Betty D and Mary Kay . . .  they were docked just south of Albany.

Mary Turecamo brought container barge New York from Red Hook to Port Elizabeth . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has many more saved up from the summer and early fall.

I couldn’t leave the earlier post from today dangling as I did.

It was ONE Ibis, the most recent in the series I’ve seen.

 

 

The pink is so vivid that the pink M on James D appears de-colored.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has focused on other birds here.

Related:  At 14,000 teu, these ONE ships are small compared with the latest ones contracted by Samsung for Evergreen . . . giants at 23,000 teu.

 

 

I know others witnessed dawn this morning as the big pink ship came in . . . .

By the way, if you were naming this ONE “bird” ULCV based on this morning’s color, which bird

would

you choose?  Nah . . . it wasn’t that.  More later.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

A few days ago I posted this twilight view of Service Boat No. 1.

So, I hope she ‘s more defined by these shots from a bit later in the port of Montreal, as she passes Toronto Express.

 

Ocean Macareux (translates as “Ocean Puffin”) follows the grain elevators on her way to –maybe–

attach some rendering. . . .

Farther along, a spud barge moved by GFFM‘s

Vent Polaire (tr. Polar Wind) seems standing by, assisted by this very

shallow draft prime mover.

Over by the Beauharnois Dam, Deschenaux (tr. Channels) stands by.

Click here for more info on the Beauharnois generating station.

Anyone know where and when Deschenaux was built?

Farther upstream yet, in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, it’s Circle Polaire (tr. Polar Circle)

And closing out this post, Ocean A. Gauthier here heads downstream to assist Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin return to a floating condition. I believe she’s still undergoing repairs in the port of Johnstown ON.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Did I remember I’d seen her before in the same estuary and in the same time of year?

No, but I had.

Did I know the difference between bitumen and asphalt?

No.  But now I do.

Keeping a daily blog of my sights and evolving understanding of them brings wonder.  Did I know the reference in the name, Da Ming Shan?

No, but I’ve since learned it . . . a place as satisfying maybe as the Hudson Highlands.  Should you care?  Not really, but I’m glad I looked these things up.

Bon voyage, watch stander…

 

as you head for Gibraltar and beyond.

All photos and musing by Will Van Dorp, who’s written about freshwater asphalt haulers here.

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