These days, seeing a spout could mark this as Lower NY Bay portion of the sixth boro, but in fact, I’m pretty far afield, and that’s what roads are for whether they be terrestrial or watery.  The land in the distance here are the right bank of the Saint Lawrence, and those whales are likely finbacks.

Whales and seals amass here for the grub.

Prince Shoal Light sits atop an underwater mountain.  The name–Prince (of Wales) Shoal stems from the fact that the Prince ran aground there, discovering the shoal in the worst possible way.

By the way, I’m told the light is for sale for one loonie.  The catch is that the buyer is responsible for all expenses related to upkeep.

Click here for info on the various species grubbing up here, trapping their prey again the steep underwater slope.

Those are the sand dunes in Tadoussac in the distance.

Seals back float?

A fin back charges and dives beneath us.

Marks on the whales, like the notch at the base of the fin, facilitate identification and longitudinal studies of whales.   Find more if you “like” a FB site called “Parc marin du Saguenay-Saint-Laurent.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who goes up the Saguenay and to the headwaters in tomorrow’s post.

By the way, I know some large tugboats built on the Great Lakes for saltwater have traveled up the Saguenay in recent years.  Anyone have photos to share?