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While waiting for Triton, I had a surprise, a big pink surprise.  I hope someone gets photos of Triton when she departs.

But here, 24 days and 13 hours out of Singapore,

it’s

ONE Apus, which rhymes with “tape us.”  Since she’s a duplicate, I think, of ONE Stork, I assumed an apus referred to a bird in some language.  Any guesses?

Here are my first photos of ONE Stork.

 

See that messenger line coming down to send up

the big  line?

It turns out that “apus” is the Latin word for the common swift, a fantastic name for a ULCV.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s minutes late for the noontime posting.

Ten years ago I did a series called “meditations” as I was pitching about to structure my days.  The series was keyed to the alphabet, A to Z.  The L meditation focused on “line.”    Picking this back up has been prompted by the photo below.

Notice anything unusual about the line seen here?  By the way, CS Peony was underway when I took the photo.

Contrast the line in the images above and below.  Notice how taut the one from the OOCL ship is.

See the somewhat diagonal line between the port side of the green vessel and the Moran tug?  It’s tightly stretched.

Below . . .  both lines are tight.

Ditto . . . below.

And along the other side of CS Peony . . .  bar tight.

In a different context, a tightrope walker like Philippe Petit could navigate that non-sagging line.

But here . . . I find this unusual.

Any ideas?

Photos and observations by Will Van Dorp.

 

By the way, did anyone get good photos of Triton, the biggest of the big ULCVs to call in the sixth boro so far?  She was coming under the Bayonne Bridge as first light was breaking.  More on that ULCV at the end of this post.

Let me start with two photos I took in Quebec City, over two years ago.

What caught my attention was the Tanzania registry.

Earlier this week I caught the “rest of the story” on this ship while reading the CBC online.  Click on the photo below of the captain to learn why this ship has not moved in over two years, a crew not shanghai’d but rather quebec’d or rather bahamian’d or most accurately, D & D maritime’d….

Now for some random ship traffic in the sixth boro, which no doubt has its own untold stories, how about this long glance at NYK Falcon, fleet mate of ONE Stork and one of the big birds of the harbor.

STI Leblon, a Brazilian reference,  heads out with an assist from Miriam Moran.  Here are many more STI tankers.

Genco Avra gets a partial load over in Greenville.

Nordmaple heads for sea.

Beauforte heads in, as does

Ems Trader.  Ems is a river reference, not an abbreviation.  Mary Turecamo is off her stern.

Did anyone get close-ups of Triton this morning?  I’d love to see them;  meanwhile, I’m hoping to catch her on the way out to sea, unless she leaves in the wee dark hours.  Port of Baltimore has made a big deal about this record-breaking vessel, as did the Panama Canal folks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The AIS image taken early afternoon the Sunday before Memorial Day shows just how crowded the waters between Narragansett Bay and the North Fork Orient Point can be;  pink is recreational boats and the greens, reds, and blues are commercial vessels.  Obviously, given the scale and the fact that the icons are about 100 times larger than the pink vessels they represent, the water is not clogged, although it is congested enough that effective watch standing is essential.

In the sixth boro it can look like the photos in this post.  Anyone operating a small boat–and relative to a 1200′ container ship like Cosco Shipping Peony, a 35′ fishing boat is truly puny.

Tugboats, any of them, are huge compared to small fishing boats.  Mary Turecamo below is 106′ loa and powered by twin engines totaling 4300 hp.

Coming from anchored units there might be a slow moving sailboat.

Summer traffic on the sixth boro is not what it is in the colder months.

 

Sometimes interventions are called for.

Be safe . .  .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thanks to Joseph Chomicz, it’s Capt. Latham in Port Elizabeth .  .  .

standing by the barge Atlanta Bridge . . .  So here’s my question . . . and answer will be located at the end of this post . . .  in quo vadis?

I’ve not seen this boat in a while . . . the 1958 Blount-built Vulcan III.

 

The “D” stands for Derrick Marine of Perth Amboy.

The current Kristin Poling stands by as Aramon is lightered before it enters the Kills.

Doris Moran moves Portland into the Kills, headed here for Shooters Island before following the channel around to the north.

Jonathan and JRT make their way home after an assist.

Mary Turecamo assists a lightered Aramon to a berth on the Arthur Kill.

Many thanks to Joe for the Capt. Latham pics;  all others by Will Van Dorp, who lacked his real camera to document the answer to the “where goest they?” question above.

Some older cargo cranes go San Juan-bound aboard Atlanta Bridge between Capt. Latham and Atlantic Enterprise.

Naming vessels after capes is entirely understandable, given their labeling and navigational importance.  This post follows up on one thanks to Kyle Stubbs from a few months back featuring photos he took in Mississippi, not this one more recently with photos from Mike Abegg taken near the Brooklyn shipyard.

Serendipity brought this following set together, all taken in less than an hour yesterday.  When I took this, I had no idea what could follow if I pursued it.

I didn’t know these were numbered consecutively, DBL 102 and DBL 103, although Kyle’s photos would obliquely suggest it.

All I knew was this might be this unit’s first arrival in the sixth boro.

Her destination could have been the anchorage.

When she turned into the Kills, I knew I needed wings on my fleet feet, and help from lady luck and her cousins coincidence and compromise.

 

Here it comes, and there’s no time to find a better site for viewing this;  Cape Lookout westbound and Cape Henry eastbound might just meet, and the foliage bordering these photos testify to how easily I could have missed it.

Money . . . .

shot!!!   I expected whistles to blows and flags to dip, and I’m sure that on wireless communication devices there was  . . .  communication.  But this shot below made my day . . . the meeting of the Kirby Capes.

x

Safe and prosperous travels!

All photos yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

 

Memorial Day weekend 2019 . . .  and we should all remember the meaning, whether we’re working or vacating from work.

You can read the names on the vessels or on the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d included no links in this post except the one that follows and which I hope you read in its entirety here.

It’s that time of year.

Some small commercial fishing boats do stay around in winter, but

I don’t recall seeing Never Enuff in frigid weather.

Catamarans like Good Karma might sail all winter, but down south ….

 

Jackie C . . . a dive boat?

 

I didn’t catch a name on this trap boat.

 

Nor here . . . .

Twisted Sisters has a load of traps.

 

I caught the name here . . . Renegade.

But not here . . .. although I know it’s a Florida Bay Coaster,

which is roomy inside but insignificant when juxtaposed with a 1200′ ULCV.

And then there are the jet skis . . .

….

This process of assembling this post has suggested a new

series, a summer series

called Mixed Craft, mixed use of the waterways.  Be safe.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Wednesday was such a spectacular day for parading into NYC’s Upper Bay that even the cormorant took notice.

USS New York had this Osprey on its deck, surrounded by a crew of sailors and marines.

Previous appearances of USS New York, in the harbor and on this blog, can be found here.

 

Also in the procession were USCGC Campbell, 

USCGC Lawrence O. Lawson,

USCGC Katherine Walker,

HMCS Glace Bay,

ketch HMCS Oriole,

USMMA’s Kings Pointer

USS Tornado, 

some YPs, and

numerous smaller craft like this one . . ..

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who encourages you to tour whichever boats capture your fancy.

Katherine Walker has appeared or been mentioned here before many times.  And–last but certainly not least– my favorite photos of Kings Pointer can be found here . . . near the end of the post.

 

 

See that lineup . . .   it can mean only one thing, and it’s not the invasion of 300 enemy warships. 

Here are some of those meeting the fleet . . .

And here the fleet, part of the vessels . . ..

Three Forty Three does the honors.

The lead gray ship has a unique appearance, seen on this blog here from about a year ago.

 

LCS-5 will be docked on Staten Island, a tour I might be interested in doing.  For the complete schedule, click here.

 

Ellen McAllister, following her to the dock, is another product of Wisconsin shipbuilding.

 

Following the LCS was DDG-109, USS Jason Dunham.  Please read the story of the namesake here.

x

 

More tomorrow, but here, passing in front of USS Jason Dunham and USS Milwaukee, is the 98-year-old HMCS Oriole, with an interesting bi-national history you can read here.  HMCS Oriole has appeared on this blog twice before, once on the West Coast and once on the Great Lakes.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous fleet week photos can be seen here.

 

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