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I blamed Christina Sun aka bowsprite for starting permutations of “tugster,” but I’m not revealing any great secret to say I’m glad for her influence.  Unrelated to that and her, I went to a new part of the “terrest boros” the other day, of course a boat was involved . . .

but more on that later . . .

stopped at a stop light, looked to my right, thought . . .  “funny, I’d been talking to my son about Utagawa Kuniyoshi just the other day . . .

and decided immediately to pull over and enjoy this version of masks on buildings.  I took this batch in four minutes flat!!  I stayed in the neighborhood for about an hour.

 

Every direction I walked,

 

and

every which way I looked . . . there were more.

Let me know if you’re interested in seeing more . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous installments.  Today’s photos all were taken in August–October2008.

Let’s start with part of the line-up for the 2008 tugboat race. If I’m not mistaken, the only boat left standing, as is, in this photo is St. Andrews, fourth from the left.

Escort, a Jakobson boat, is currently laid up.

Sea Raven, an intriguing “composite” vessel, whose hull was composed of two hulls of 1941 hulls, has been scrapped.

She was called Lone Ranger when she was in the sixth boro in 2008, owned by the CEO of Progressive Insurance.  The former oil-platform towing vessel is still on the seas, now as Sea Ranger. 

Ah!  Cheyenne . . . she been on this blog countless times. 

Frances, as she’s called now,  . . . back then I feared she was not long for this world…

Baltic Sea . . .  I’d love to see her now as she works the Gulf of Guinea.

I’ll repeat this photo . . . as a parting tribute shot, and since St Andrews is the only survivor, let me

show her tangling it up with Edith Thornton, with Dorothy Elizabeth watching.

x

x

 

Along the Jersey shore . . .  it’s Candace, a Damen Shoalbuster design . . . built at Eastern Shipbuilding in 2004.

Hete’s a slightly sharper, closer shot.

Working with Candace in dredge support, it’s Trevor.

Trying to keep her ground tackle tackling the bay bed, it’s Linda Moran holding with Houston.

OSG 350 is practically a ship . . . and she’s pushed by

a force more powerful than what drives some ships, the 12,000 hp OSG Vision.  I first saw her here in 2010.

Also, holding fast or trying to, it’s Genesis Valiant, previously Erie Service.

In much calmer weather, it’s Nicole Leigh Reinauer and

Atlantic Enterprise, formerly Barents Sea.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s where I first saw her in mid September.  At first I thought it was NOAAS Thomas Jefferson (S 222), though I was guessing only by the color and had seen Jefferson here once before, back after Sandy. 

Before that, bowsprite had seen Jefferson.  But NOAA has over a dozen vessels, and the only other two I’d seen were RV Henry B. Bigelow and RV Ferdinand R. Hassler.  Here is info on the fate of the first Hassler.

But in mid October I last saw Foster, likely on her departure from the sixth boro, because the other day I noticed on her FB page that she’s been collecting samples of  invasive dinoflagellates in the Gulf of Maine and now she’s back in her homeport of

Charleston.    So who was Nancy Foster, the namesake?

Click here.  And if you’re wondering why Jefferson has a NOAA vessel named for him, it’s because he authorized the first US coastal survey in 1807.  That survey, by the way, was headed up by Mr. Hassler.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

So who heads up NOAA today?  Click here.

Check out these shots of Cheyenne –a former staple in the sixth boro–recently in her new ecosystem.

Cheyenne recently assisted this  unit getting out of a waterway in Detroit.

 

Powering the barge to a port on another Lake is Evans McKeil, built in Balboa, Panama, in 1936!  In comparison, Cheyenne (1965, Brooklyn) is a youngster.

The lights from steelmaking in Detroit are truly unique.

 

Niagara Spirit is a large barge . . . 340′ x 78′ with a carrying capacity of almost 8000 metric tons.  In this case, the cargo is just over 6000 tons of coke . . . .  That’s not Coke.

And when the job is done, Cheyenne returns to her berth along the Detroit river, resting up for the next job.

All photos by an anonymous mariner.

I take a lot of photos.  A few are extraordinary, IMHO.  The photo below ranks among that select set.

Above and below, it’s Jonathan C Moran.  Sharon Sea heads for sea above.

Atlantic Salvor takes yet another scow filled with dredge spoils out to the dumping grounds.

Atlantic Dawn heads out.

Emily Ann tows Chesapeake 1000 down toward Norfolk.

St Andrews moves a petro barge.

Frances has a headline to a barge in the anchorage.

Two Vane boats wait in Gowanus Bay.

And James D. has a line onto ONE Stork.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I didn’t plan it, but this past week, I’ve seen a lot of Dann Marine boats, so that’s why this post.

Running against a NW wind, Pearl Coast handles some spray quite handily as she tows Cement Transporter 1801. She’s a big boat:  127′ x 40′ with 5600 hp.  Click here for previous appearances of her on this blog.

Into that same wind, here’s Ivory Coast heading light along the Delaware shore.  Click here for previous posts with Ivory Coast.

 

I believe this is my first time to add East Coast to this blog, although she’s been in the Dann Marine fleet for several daces.

Welcome then.  She’s on the Sugar Express run between Florida and Yonkers. See previous Sugar Express posts here.

And another Dann Marine boat I suspect I’ve not seen before . . . Sun Coast,

inbound at the Narrows.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Today I caught the stork, one stork.

I had work to do, but I just couldn’t let this big cherry blossom magenta vessel pass unrecorded, especially not on a sunny late October day.  Besides, I could work twice as hard the next few days . . ..

Wait . . . I thought it was one STORK!??

Yup . . . one stork from Tokyo.

No way!  It’s one tug named James D. Moran.

This minimal superstructure probably contributes to fuel economy.

 

She’s a product of Japan Marine United Corporation in Kure shipyard, Hiroshima.

And for some really cool alongside on the dock photos, here are a few from Sean McQuilken in Charleston.

 

It’s more than 100 feet up to the bridge wing!

Thanks to Sean for use of these photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Her first steel was laid down almost a decade ago, and here she is pirouetting for New Yorkers.  Carriers tend to have these offset superstructures.  I wonder how it feels to be far-to-starboard in rough seas.  To see the commander in his seat of power, click here.

This ship was christened with a bottle of perfectly good Bowmore whisky, produced by a distillery established not long after US independence.  Of course, today it’s not wholly Scottish owned, if I read this correctly.

Ah . . . the ski jump!  To see F-35 pilots landing and taking off, click here.

Along the port side, the lines are relatively unbroken.

Here, thanks to Michele Fitzgerald McMorrow, is a close-up of the bridge.

Shuttling ship-shore is a passenger vessel I’ve not seen before,

Cosmo, built 1968,

but I know little else about her, although I love the paint scheme.

 

An unobstructed view from the stern shows her size and the sheer of the ski-jump.

 

Comparing the view of her port side to this emphasizes the offset superstructure.

That looks like Gabby Miller supporting the deck barge.

Thanks to Michele for use of her photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Seeing a tugboat on a mooring in the sixth boro is unusual, in my experience, and I took many shots.  This is my favorite.

Neptune the other morning headed for sea along the sylvan banks of Staten Island.

James E. Brown moves a scow, likely to be filled with scrap metals.

Brian Nicholas travels to a job  . . . that’s New Jersey off her starboard.

JRT Moran crosses the Upper Bay enroute to an assist.

Genesis Eagle travels along Brooklyn’s Owl’s Head.

One almost has the illusion here that Emily Ann is on assist with that tanker.  Almost.

Mister Jim lighters salt

from SBI Phoebe.

Sea Lion heads out of her base to grab  . . . a recycling barge perhaps.

And Atlantic Salvor continues shuttling dredge spoils from somewhere off the bottom of the North River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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