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A half decade ago I posted photos of Peg Wallace, a 37.6′ x 6.8′  Hooper Island drake tail fish boat.  Click here (and scroll) for some of the small fish boats between Ocracoke and Hatteras.  Long, narrow, upswept bow for the seas . . .  This one below has the delightful name El Avispon (hornet).

The major difference between the dead rise boats of eastern US and these is the location of the shelter.  The one heading for the market is Mi Novio (my boyfriend).

 

At the fish market, one boat was hauled out for some repairs and repainting.  Long and skinny.

Many more were either transferring necessities or anchored.

Norma Edith II might be a coastal cargo boat as well as a buy boat.

The fish market is located between the old and new cities.

Dona Martira J  . . .  another buy boat?

Kojira . . . a small purse seiner? The name sounds a bit like the Japanese word for “whale.”

and two larger purse seiners:  Kljubica (2014) and Lautaro (1982), now both out fishing.   These larger purse seiners sometimes carry small helicopters on the cabin roof to spot schools of fish.  And that upper observation station, it raises the height of eye as does the upper wheelhouse on tugs.

Martina C is in the port of Balboa, possibly still getting repairs.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who offers this recipe for delicious ceviche.   Click here for the any sixth boro fishing posts on tugster.

And a repeated request:   Show me your seat.  What I mean is this:  I’d like to do a post on captain’s and/or pilot’s chairs.  I’m looking for the luxurious all the way to decrepit or basic.  Email me a photo of the chair and identify the vessel. You don’t need to be sitting in it.  I appreciate it.

Any guesses on the ID of the building with the massive curve?  Answer at the end of the post.

A lot of Offshore Supply Vessels (OSVs) anchored off Amador.  By appearance, I’d wager a vessel like D. Oceano once worked in the Gulf of Mexico.  OSVs “sold foreign” can likely be found in numbers in places elsewhere in the Caribbean and Gulf of Guinea.  How about the Caspian?

These have the same basic design.   Of these, all I can identify is the 1982 Diamond Sea, whose previous names were Coastal Moon and Geri Tide.  Their purpose is likely to transport large floating fenders.

Big Dolphin provides confirmation of the design/build:  this site says she comes from Thoma-Sea in Lockport LA in 1982, although it’s my sense that Thoma-Sea didn’t exist yet at that time.  Her previous names are Patricia Bruce, Grady Allen, Maple River, Viveros V, and Great Darien.

It’s Panama Responder I (1954?) in the middle and –the blue North Sea trawler conversion to the right–Gamboa Express.

Above to the left and below . . . I don’t know.  Might she be used to collect slops? Notice Gamboa Express to the right.  I could do a post on her.

Meyers Gustav here is way at the limits of my zoom.  Built 1963 in Port Arthur TX, she has previously sailed under the names Lafayette, Beverly B, and Galapagos.

Bocas Mariner (1981 and ex-Rebel Brio and Gulf Fleet No. 303) and Burica Mariner (1982 and ex-Arcemont Tide) also have that US Gulf  look.

 

Orion XX,  with Algab in the background, appears to be an oil pollution vessel now, but her life began as YOG-77 built in Bremerton WA in 1945.  Since then, she’s also been Bob’s Boat and Northern Orion.  She was once a twin of a vessel that ended up in the “Graves of Arthur Kill.”   See other YOGs here.

Victory is definitely NOT an OSV, but she was anchored near us.

Schlep is all I can identify here, and I include her here because of the Yokohamas alongside.

The photo below I took in early December 2014, Intl Defender near LaRose, LA, along the Lafourche.  So besides Panama, where has the excess OSV capacity gone off to, particularly after the Gulf oil slowdown?  Here’s a post I did back then.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And that curved building . . . who is it associated with?  Answer here.

Finally, I have a request:  Show me your seat.  What I mean is this:  I’d like to do a post on captain’s and/or pilot’s chairs.  I’m looking for the luxurious all the way to decrepit or basic.  Email me a photo of the chair and identify the vessel.  I appreciate it.

By the way, A to P, if you suffer from CRS as I do, expands to Atlantic to Pacific, across the skinny continent of Panama.  Today’s post makes me want to create a “crew finder” profile, as this would be a way to gallivant across the Pacific in style, in exchange for less work than young Melville was expected to perform.

Let’s make this a numbers post.  Yersin, launched 2015, cost $70m.  I don’t know my cabin cruisers that well, but the boat in the foreground with an overload upforward has US boatbuilder lines.

Yersin, when launched, was set up for 20 crew and 20 guests.

Yacht Lionheart runs a cool $150m.  Forty crew attend to 12 guests.

Andiamo is “low end”:  12 guests and 6 crew.  Ice-class hull, she was offered for sale in 2012 for $20m.  I believe I’ve seen her on the Great Lakes or the Saint Lawrence or the sixth boro, but that could be just a common name.

Joseph Conrad (ex-Saturn) dates from 1916, with a major refit in 2004.  She can run with 8 guests with 5 crew.  Priceless.

Azuleta, a Turkish gulet, is also priceless here, and works charters out of Panama City.  For some other gulets for sale, click here.

Rocinante, 2008 with a 2015 refit, has 32 crew for 12 guests.  She recently changed hands for $128m.

Constance dates from 1986, and 10 crew serve 10 guests. Previous names are PAMINUSCH, MONTEATH, MONTIGNE, and JANA.

Wind Star, launched 1986, accommodates 148 passengers with 101 crew.  I recall the excitement back 30 years ago when she was said to be the first commercial sailing vessel of this size built in over a half century.

Dorothea III, $50m, was launched in 2007 and can have 10 crew for 8 passengers.

Lalamanzi is a St Francis 44 cat, crewed by a couple from South Africa, heading home across the Pacific and Indian Oceans.

And finally, Belle Ourse (Pretty Bear) wins my prize for the best name.   She hails from Montreal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  And the grand total is . . . a lot of dough!  But while I’m looking over the fence at stuff owned by the Vanderbilts of our era,  I encourage you to read this thoroughly fascinating article about a private jet broker, Steve Varsano, who sells to the same social segment as can afford these yachts.

 

Gatun Lake, slightly less than half the area of the Salton Sea, sees diverse traffic: ships, yachts, and small craft.  Below is a Canal security boat, of which we saw several in our transit.  That’s a range marker in the trees.

Twenty-something miles of the transit is across the Lake, named for a village on the lower Chagres River.  Given the amount of dredging in the Lake, crew boats are common.

Ecotourism boats are common in some areas  . . . these boats operating near Gamboa.

The Panama Canal Railway runs along the waterway in places, carrying mostly containers, a few passengers, and in this case repair equipment.

OK . . . this is a digression.

Given the traffic through this intersection of the oceans, pilot boats abound,

as do launch service boats.  The one above and below work on the Pacific side here.

This particular morning we saw a wave of SUPers.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has many more photos in the hopper, including the expedition yacht above.  Any identification anyone?

 

The “enlargement” of the Panama Canal involved a lot of dredging in Panama, as well as in ports served by the Neopanamax ships:  deepening approaches, widening channels, and even eliminating islands in part or whole in Gatun Lake.  I put the ” ” there because it’s more accurate to say “creating a third set of locks,” two sets were built a century ago.  To illustrate click here;  in the fifth photo, Atlantic Polaris is in set 1, and Nord Snow Queen in set 2.   Try again, in the same post, the fourth photo from the end, Bow Summer is in the first set, and Ever Dynamic in the second.   The third set construction site was visible back in 2012 here in the fifth photo, on the hill beyond Water Phoenix.

To dredging then, on the Atlantic side, DEME is busy with a fleet

that includes D’Artagnan heading up the efforts, a cutterhead suction dredge that can work down to 114.’

A category I’d not seen before is a self-propelled hopper barge, such as Pagadder and

Sloeber, although the latter was behind a dock that obscured most of her.  On the photo above, see the split midships on the bow;  that’s how she bottom dumps, as a dump scow would.

Quibian I is Panama-flagged and working in Lake Gatun, which is really the dammed up Chagres River.

 

The tenders alongside include (far to near)  Diablo, Espada, and Diablo II.

Drill barge Barú, proudly christened in 2006,  is one of the dredge-related vessels operating near the Culebra Cut. Barú, named for a Panamanian volcano, seems an appropriate name for a vessel whose mission is to drill holes so that charges can be set.   Back in 2012, I got these photos of charges detonated after being set deep by Kraken, over in the Arthur Kill.

The tender above and below is Chame II.  She followed us toward Culebra Cut while she was on a run to load more explosives.

Over on the Pacific side, dredging is performed by Jan de Nul, a Luxembourgois dredging firm.   Filippo Brunelleschi ran day and night dredging the Pacific side approaches;  a trailing suction hopper dredge, she can operate down to 124 ‘!  To digress, I’m not sure which tugs were there off the stern and in front of Taboga.

Not surprisingly for a European firm, Jan de Nul (JDN)–like DEME–uses self-propelled split hopper scows.

The two here are Magellano 1800 above and Verrazzano 1800 below, both flagged Mauritius (Port Louis) like the JDN tug we saw here.

And finally, that’s Filippo B in the distance coming back in toward the Pacificside locks, passing Maggie M.  I’m not sure why Maggie M was anchored here.

All photos by Will Van Drop, who suggests these places to celebrate the green saint’s day.

 

My photos of ACP tugs are coming, just not yet because in the  unrivaled crossroads of the oceans that is the Panama Canal, a slow look-around brings unparalleled reward.  Take Pacific Hope with her classic lines in diminutive scale.   Any ideas on her mission?  I figured oceanographic research, but

built in 1983 and registered in Dominica, she provides medical and dental care.  According to Facebook, she’s currently underway and bound for Cartagena, now quite high on my gallivanting list.

It appears the MSC vessel has calved?

Hercules Pride, in spite of her 1/3 scale, makes bunker runs between the Balboa port and the terminal on the island of Melones.

Pana Venture . . . nice lines but too many years on the hook with too little TLC . . .  that’s all I can say.   Anyone help?

Don Chebo appears to be a small tanker.  While trying to find info on the ship, I learned the name comes from a comic character in Guatemala.

Whatever the provenance of the ship, her propulsion comes from two Thrustmaster units, as seen in these Erie Canal boats. 

Discoverer 2 is tied up in Balboa between seismic assignments.  That appears to be the Sinopec logo right behind the wheelhouse.

Andres Felipe IV  . . . a modified landing craft, with the controls moved forward and to starboard?

Lady Remington II (a great name) and Coiba Cargo . . .  await cargo in a marina out by the Causeway Islands.

A Point-class former USCG patrols the Pacific side of the canal.

And I’ll end on a surprise, although not really . . . it’s USCGC Vigorous, a 1967 product of Lorain OH!  It appears that a crew boat is just arriving alongside.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

A joy I felt on the Pacific side came from seeing North American boats in these new seas.  Capt Latham stood out unambiguously as US ATB when I spotted her at anchor on the Pacific side, and has now made her way into the Canal.

The lines on Algab also suggested a past life in the US, and in fact, she was a US Army tug known as LT-331, built in Mobile AL in 1942.  She’d also operated for Moran and Bisso.

Pipsa I,  here with barge Ecomar 1 and operated by Ecomar as a slops/bilge water collection barge, strikes me also as a US design.  Anyone with ideas?  This reminds me of deadend I met with this Cuban tug . . .

Yaman is a 2011 China built tug registered in Chile.

Smit Guadeloupe here assists MSC Channe.

In the container port of Balboa and awaiting orders lie (l to r) Smit Grenada, Smit Dane (maybe), Smit Balboa, and Smit Curaçao.

Don Lucho is Netherlands Damen built 2008 and now sailing under the flag of Colombia, literally.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

A to P, being Atlantic to Pacific, beginning in Limón Bay–the Atlantic side of the isthmus:  it has a lot of ACP boats, and I’ll focus on those later, but for now, let’s sample the others I saw on the trip across the Bay to Cristobal.

This one on the hard in Shelter Bay . . . all I tell you about it is that it’s a Damen Stan Tug 1606 registered in Port Louis and likely operated by Jan de Nul Group, which has huge dredging interests in the Canal;  I’ll post photos of dredging soon.  Port Louis . . . would that be Grenada?

Choroy was built in Singapore in 1997.

The colors here in the port of Cristobal are perfect.

SST Portobello, built in Vietnam and the Netherlands and arrived here last year, bears the name of a Panamanian port recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

SST Yagui is a 2011 build, flagged Mexican, or was at one time.  The prefix SST could represent SaamSmit Towage.

Smit Aruba (2006) has been painted in Saam Smit colors.

I believe that says Choy Lee, which suggests the owners of this small tug want to be associated with builder of a class of  ACP tugs. 

Choy Lee‘s partner on the job is Thelma S. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Tugster robots have done most of the work around here the past week and a half as I’ve transited a continent, in the skinniest possible location, starting from old Fort Sherman . . . past the Toro Point Light

hightailing past some toothy denizens

and fuel boats and

avoiding treacherous reefs of Limon Bay

to rise up across the continental divide

past the signs and

cut through that divide and under the 100 years’ bridge

and down to Pacific level.  This shot shows the entrance to the Miraflores locks to the right and the the new Cocoli locks to the left.

Turning Pacificward, that’s the islands of (l to r) Tabogilla and Taboga, where Gauguin recuperated.

We anchored in a bay just off the Flamenco Island signal station.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has hundreds more covering the transit and gallivants at either end.  By the way, the first ship I saw at Gatun was NYK Daedalus, a sixth boro regular.

 

The harbor of NYC . . . the watery parts I call the sixth boro . . . is quite diverse.  Bridgebuilder 22 (2012) I caught in Erie Basin,

where I also saw Miss Aida (2002), formerly known as American Muscle.  Now that’s a name!!

Stephen B has been on the blog before, but this is the first time I had my camera with me as I passed Westchester Creek.

Treasure Coast was at Caddell Dry Dock and Repair earlier this month . . .

as were Evening Mist and Genesis Glory and 

Pearl Coast.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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